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Fr0do
2003-Nov-05, 04:04 PM
Just got my first one, haven't had a chance to test it out good yet cause of cloudy skies but I have a few questions...
Could I see saturn and jupiter, and mars with it? probobly mars but dunno about the others..... and I think it's pretty much safe to say mt scope sucks... it's only a 60mm reflector mofel.... and if I could see saturn and jupiter where would I go about to find them? evertbody knows where mars is sooo... anyway, can anybody help a newbie out?.... ohhhhhh, and could I see the orion neb? I know where that is though

Eroica
2003-Nov-05, 05:46 PM
Could I see Saturn and Jupiter, and Mars with it? ... and could I see the Orion Nebula?
These can all be seen with the naked eye. So. I'm guessing yes.

Welcome to the board!

Glom
2003-Nov-05, 05:51 PM
Welcome.

Jupiter would be the easiest to see in theory because it's the brightest. Saturn is also okay. Mars is a little harder but still one of the brighter objects in the sky. I doubt a magnitude 4 object would be that clear through a 60mm. But it depends on your location.

Mars
Set: 01:01 on 05/11/2003
Rise: 14:36 on 05/11/2003
Transit: 19:48 on 05/11/2003
RA: 22h 46m 16.4s Dec: -1002'25"
Phase: 88.845%, Apparent magnitude: -1.05

Saturn
Transit: 04:01 on 05/11/2003
Set: 12:07 on 05/11/2003
Rise: 19:51 on 05/11/2003
RA: 06h 56m 44.7s Dec: +2204'03"
Phase: 99.773%, Apparent magnitude: -0.51

Jupiter
Rise: 01:22 on 06/11/2003
Transit: 08:01 on 06/11/2003
Set: 14:41 on 06/11/2003
RA: 11h 02m 10.8s Dec: +0714'15"
Phase: 99.370%, Apparent magnitude: -1.91

Great Nebula in Orion
Orion Nebula
M42
NGC 1976
Other description: Nebula.
Constellation: Ori
Dreyer description: A magnificent (or otherwise interesting) object! Theta1 Ori and the great nebula; = M42.
Magnitude: 4.0
RA: 05h 35m 35.5s Dec: -0526'39"
RA: 05h 35m 24.0s Dec: -0527'00" (Epoch 2000)
Rise: 21:09 Transit: 02:47 Set: 08:22
Size:66.0'

Location was set to London so rise, set and transit times probably won't help much.

tngolfplayer
2003-Nov-05, 06:25 PM
This week, Mars can be found in the south, justto the "right" of the moon(if facing south). Saturn rises about 10:30 EST in the east. The bright star at the "top" of Orion rises at almost the same time, and a little farther south than Saturn. Don't be dissapointed when all you see in the nebula is a "cotton ball". You should be able to resolve the 4 bright stars in the core of the nebula, and a faint glow around them. Jupiter rises some time around 1 I think, but the besat time to view it would be in the morning around 5. That way it is high enough above the horizon to be out of the turbulance. Congrats on getting the scope and hope you enjoy it.

Fr0do
2003-Nov-05, 07:56 PM
what's a magnitude 4 object? does that include the planets or are you just talking about the neb... I've always been intrigued by astronomy and if I really like this I'm gonna buy a really good scope, I probobly will really like this if I know myself... and you talk about stars rising in the east a certain times and stuff, well I'm sure that there's more than one star in the east a time... I don't know anything sooo this is all knew to me.... and I live in new-brunswick canada, so if it rises at certain places for you it shouldn't really be the same for me.... right? I know these questions are all stupid.... sorry

RichField
2003-Nov-05, 08:32 PM
what's a magnitude 4 object? does that include the planets or are you just talking about the neb... I've always been intrigued by astronomy and if I really like this I'm gonna buy a really good scope, I probobly will really like this if I know myself... and you talk about stars rising in the east a certain times and stuff, well I'm sure that there's more than one star in the east a time... I don't know anything sooo this is all knew to me.... and I live in new-brunswick canada, so if it rises at certain places for you it shouldn't really be the same for me.... right? I know these questions are all stupid.... sorry

Magnitude (http://skyandtelescope.com/howto/basics/article_238_1.asp) is the scale used to measure the brightness of an object. The smaller the number, the brighter the object. Intuitive huh? Each integer step is roughly 2.5 times dimmer than the previous number. From Glom's post, Mars is about 1.5 times brighter than Saturn and Jupiter is about twice as bright as Mars. The Orion Nebula (M42) is over 60 times fainter than Saturn. The light from the nebula is also spread over a larger area than that from the planets making it slightly harder to detect than a star of the same magnitude. The linked article explains it well.

While you're there, you might want to follow their links back to the start of Sky & Telescope's Astronomy Basics (http://skyandtelescope.com/howto/basics/) section. Worth bookmarking and working through on cloudy nights.

To try to identify which bright object is the one you're looking for you'll probably need some type of map of the sky. These can be obtained from magazines like Sky & Tel and Astronomy, books, or online. There's quite a few to choose from like www.heavens-above.com, Sky & Tel (http://skyandtelescope.com/observing/skychart/) again, or www.skyviewcafe.com If you're having trouble with specific object, coming back here and asking for advice is usually effective.

As for rise and set times, it appears that Glom gave the times in local time. That's good, it means that it should be roughly the same for any time zone though it could potentially be off by an hour. (Though I did a double take to see why he posted info for May 11 :wink: ) If you're having trouble finding it at the time listed, the charting web pages above, combined with your location and time zone should help pin it down for your specific situation.

zebo-the-fat
2003-Nov-07, 09:51 PM
I strongly advise you to join your local astronomy club, you will get lots of helpful advice from the members, as well as the chance to use other peoples equipment. :D

Russ
2003-Nov-08, 09:56 PM
It should probably be noted that all of the objects you ask about can certainly be seen with with your scope. It should also be noted that they will not look like the pictures on the box the scope came in or in any of the astronomy magazines. Mars will look like a small orange dot. Jupiter will be the most impressive but will still be a fuzzy blob. Saturn will be a slightly smaller blob than Jupiter but will have a horriizontally oriented, ovate blob surrounding it that will look to be about the same diameter as Jupiter (the rings). The Orion Nebula will be what's called a "Faint Fuzzy". Something you can just convince yourself that you can see shape and light from.

I whole heartedly agree that finding your nearest astronomy club and attending a few star gazes, is the best thing you could do for yourself. The old, highly experienced, members will be happy to help get your scope set up for maximum performance. They will also be happy to let you look through their huge scopes so you can get light-bucket-fever and get a huge scope of your own. :wink: :lol:

Welcome to the BABB and good hopping with your new toy! :D

Fr0do
2003-Nov-08, 10:28 PM
Even though I wish I could, I can't join a club right now, I live in a pretty small town and gotta wait til I graduate to move in the city for college to join a club, witch will be this year...

Vermonter
2003-Nov-09, 02:41 AM
I picked up a Meade DS-114 reflector last night...not a bad deal at $239! It came with the usual assortment of lenses (25mm, 12.5mm, 4mm) a long-barrel 3x Barlow, a monochrome electronic eyepiece, and a dual-axis drive (it is an alt-az mount) complete with the AutoStar GOTO controller!