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AstroMike
2002-Mar-24, 11:16 PM
Here is the e-mail section of the Redzero site, which has been updated.

http://www.redzero.demon.co.uk/moonhoax/email.html

The one from the "Haywood" guy made me laugh.

SeekingKnowledge
2002-Mar-24, 11:16 PM
Is there any serious legitimite argument against the spacesuits? I've heard this argument before that the space suits just couldn't handle the extreme temps of the moon, plus I remember hearing something about a liquid of somesort that pumps through tubes inside the suit that kept the astronauts cool, and that this liquid also just couldn't handle the extreme temps of the moon. Any truth to any of this?

Andrew
2002-Mar-24, 11:35 PM
A popular argument with the hoax believers is the "extreme" temperatures encountered on the moon. The surface temperature of the moon can gets as high as 250 degrees farenheit (about 120 celsius). But the Apollo landings were at lunar dawn. It takes about a week from then to get to noon seeing as a lunar day is 2 weeks long.
Seeing as it was lunar dawn the surface temperatures were less. I've heard around 180 degrees farenheit (about 80 celsius). But so what? If you watch Formula 1 at all, and it's a hot day when they're doing it, if they display the track temperature, you can clearly see it's usually a whole lot more than the ambient temperature. Though there is no ambient air temperature on the moon.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Andrew on 2002-03-24 18:36 ]</font>

Kaptain K
2002-Mar-25, 12:19 AM
Is there any serious legitimite argument against the spacesuits?
Not really. Although Hoax Believers like to quote "250 dgrees", remember that the surface of the moon is vacuum. It is not the same as sticking your head in a 250 deg. oven. Heat is transmitted by convection, conduction, and radiation. In vacuum, there is no convection. The only conduction path is through the soles of the boots and they were very well insulated. That leaves radiation (sunlight). That is why the spacesuits were white. Most (90+%) of the radiation was reflected away. The biggest problem was with getting rid of the heat produced by the astronaut's body.

...I remember hearing something about a liquid of somesort that pumps through tubes inside the suit that kept the astronauts cool and that this liquid also just couldn't handle the extreme temps of the moon.
The liquid was...water. The only temperature extreme it had to handle was 98.6. The water was circulated through a "sublimator plate" in the backpack. Small amounts of water were sprayed on the plate where it froze. Heat from the circulating water sublimated the frost, carrying away the heat.

SeekingKnowledge
2002-Mar-25, 12:31 AM
good stuff

JayUtah
2002-Mar-25, 01:54 AM
http://www.apollohoax.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=785&forum=12&3

I just got done writing this over at ApolloHoax, and I don't want to type it all over again.

Just because the side of a rock facing the sun gets up to 250 F doesn't mean the shady side is that hot, doesn't mean some other material will have the same thermal characteristics, and doesn't mean various methods of heat rejection won't work.

The best way to cool off a space suit is to make sure it doesn't get hot in the first place. The outer layer is brilliant white. It reflects away most of the sunlight that hits it. Then you just have to reject the heat that the astronaut generates through metabolism. Sublimators work great for that. Really great. Some astronauts claimed they were a bit too cool for comfort.

Thermodynamics is one of those sciences whose quantitative practice requires good math skills and an engineer-sized bottle of Excedrin, but whose basic principles are not hard to understand. But many people simply want to cruise on their incorrect intuitions and not make the effort even to learn the basics.