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John Jaksich
2008-Dec-14, 01:06 PM
With the promise that M-theory seems to have given---to the possibility of unifying most of physics, is there now the possibility that there are certain aspects of the known Universe in which c is not the "speed limit? More to the point: do we have any inkling that we (humanly) may possess the ability to travel at "c" -- due to M-theory in a multi-dimensional sense?

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Note to moderators:

If need be, you may move this post to ATM as necessary.

mugaliens
2008-Dec-14, 03:00 PM
I enjoyed reading the discussion tab on Wikipedia's entry for M-theory (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M-theory):


"Something like this: M-Theory is a theory of the structure of the universe that speculates our universe may have emerged from the collision of two membranes of energy which exist in higher spatial dimensions than we can currently perceive."

Essentially, "M" stands for "membrane," and the theory is "the unique supersymmetric theory in eleven dimensions." Put simply, it sort of ties together many of the previous string theories. More directly, it's an attempt to unify the five string theories by reconciling their dualities.

John Jaksich
2008-Dec-14, 03:18 PM
I enjoyed reading the discussion tab on Wikipedia's entry for M-theory (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M-theory):


"Something like this: M-Theory is a theory of the structure of the universe that speculates our universe may have emerged from the collision of two membranes of energy which exist in higher spatial dimensions than we can currently perceive."

Essentially, "M" stands for "membrane," and the theory is "the unique supersymmetric theory in eleven dimensions." Put simply, it sort of ties together many of the previous string theories. More directly, it's an attempt to unify the five string theories by reconciling their dualities.

I am fairly aware of some of the ins/outs of the basics (see Gibbs Lecture 1998, American Mathematical Society (speaker) Prof Edward Witten )....I am throwing out a question that probably needs some type of clarification. If no one wants to entertain the question beyond the basics--that is O.K. with me.

John Jaksich
2008-Dec-14, 04:23 PM
Some standard answers that might be given are (1) a (?) singularity in space-time forms a tunnel to allow crossing to distant parts of the Universe using sub-speeds of light (2) a black hole forms in space-time to allow crossing into a dffferent dimension and out the other end of black hole (this one seems even daffier than the first) (3) using "super-strings" as a starting point---we may possibly hypothesize that light consists of an (?) open string and that in order to travel through the through the string (we use the Feynman concept of "least-action") to state that we may attempt to travel through the super-string (light string) as a means of a conduit to travel with light -- itself.


Does anyone care to comment?:question:

John Jaksich
2008-Dec-15, 02:22 PM
Note to moderators:

My post is self-evolving into a "pseudo-time-travel" paradigm --- need advisement if necessary

Apologize for seemingly unprofessional and overly-speculative nature.

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If we are to take that it is possible to travel at "c" by traveling "embedded" in an open string? --- It then renders the fact that time travel is not strictly possible by Special Relativity / General Relativity but using an open string to travel trans-brane into an alternate Universe.

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Further note to moderators:

If deemed necessary close the post.

John Mendenhall
2008-Dec-15, 05:42 PM
Show me a string theory prediction supported by observation, testable and repeatable.

As the Chesire Cat said to Alice, "If you don't know where you're going, one direction is as good as another."

John Jaksich
2008-Dec-15, 07:45 PM
My post is not meant to be off topic...but since it became that ... I must own up to it...

my arms seem to flailing about every which way...I asked to close the post...or advisement from a moderator?

John Mendenhall
2008-Dec-15, 07:55 PM
My post is not meant to be off topic...but since it became that ... I must own up to it...

my arms seem to flailing about every which way...I asked to close the post...or advisement from a moderator?

No, your posts are fine. It's string theory that has problems.

Cougar
2008-Dec-15, 08:40 PM
With the promise that M-theory seems to have given---to the possibility of unifying most of physics, is there now the possibility that there are certain aspects of the known Universe in which c is not the "speed limit?

John's right. See Smolin's The Trouble With Physics, The rise of string theory, the fall of a science, and what comes next [2006] for one professional's take on the subject.

As to "the possibility that there are certain aspects of the known Universe in which c is not the speed limit..." well, there are already certain aspects where c is not the speed limit. Quantum tunneling comes to mind.


More to the point: do we have any inkling that we (humanly) may possess the ability to travel at "c" -- due to M-theory in a multi-dimensional sense?

I am unaware of any such inkling. :neutral: Of course, I am no Witten. Or Smolin.

John Jaksich
2008-Dec-15, 08:49 PM
Thank you for the information...:cool: