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View Full Version : Help with the physics of fringe claim



Hans
2008-Dec-18, 03:24 AM
From the Above top secret forums I found this claim.

http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread419929/pg2

Claim:

Keep in mind that our oceans are currently traveling close to 1,000 mile per hour at the equator, and if there were a crustal displacement or pole shift, then these masses of water would have wanted to continue in the same direction already traveling in, and would of course, wash over continents.

End of claim

??

Gillianren
2008-Dec-18, 03:33 AM
Well, if "crustal displacement" means what I think it does, the oceans would be the least of our problems. However, "crustal displacement" and "pole shift" happen all the time. There are constant earthquakes (as Henrik!), and the poles drift around constantly. Again, if they mean the Earth flipping over, there are bigger problems.

Ken G
2008-Dec-18, 05:49 AM
Also, it's not clear why they would single out the oceans, and not also mention that the land is moving at 1000 miles per hour too. It sounds like they are suggesting the land could stop rotating and the oceans would not, but there's a little thing known as angular momentum to contend with there. Anyway, if the point is that the Earth has a huge amount of rotational energy, and if really unlikely things happened to the planet, that could set up nasty imbalances, then I'm sure that's true. But like Gillianren said, if one is to stipulate dramatic changes in the shape of the Earth, flooding is only one of many dangers.

Van Rijn
2008-Dec-18, 06:29 AM
This is Charles Hapgood/Immanuel Velikovsky nonsense. The idea is that somehow the Earth's crust is an incredibly strong, single unit floating on an essentially frictionless surface, and that some force can somehow rapidly change the rotation or angle of rotation of the entire crust as a unit, but somehow not the core, mantle or oceans.

It's not just ridiculous, but painfully ridiculous.

astromark
2008-Dec-18, 06:41 AM
Yes. There seems to be a very big gap in understanding. Polarity flip and Axes flip. They are very different things. Earths magnetic polarity has changed several times and does wonder around in both location and strength. We can not say the same of Earths axial tilt and rational direction... I do not foresee any event that would change that.

McFluffy
2008-Dec-18, 10:30 PM
Yes. There seems to be a very big gap in understanding. Polarity flip and Axes flip. They are very different things. Earths magnetic polarity has changed several times and does wonder around in both location and strength. We can not say the same of Earths axial tilt and rational direction... I do not foresee any event that would change that.

You're not alone in noticing the lack of understanding of Polarity Flip and it's consequences to life on earth.

I'm not any kind of scientist, but I was introduced to Polarity Flip whilst I was still in (or not long out of) single figures, and as a consequence I have no particular worries concerning the continuing validity of life on Earth as a result of such a Polarity Flip.

If I were to guess at a possible cause for the lack of understanding as to the difference between Polarity Flip and Axes Flip, then I would suggest that it stems from the tendency of some people (who should know better) to remove the letters i-t-y from the word polarity, and thus refer to the phenomenon as "Polar Flip".
The phrase "Polar Flip" could be interpreted as meaning that the geographical North and South poles might switch places, or in other words for the whole world to flip over.

We must always take care to use precise language when discussing these radical events, particularly when dealing with people who work in other disciplines, and who may not share our level of understanding when it comes to technical terminology.

Hans
2008-Dec-18, 11:22 PM
Thanks for the learned input, appreciated.

Veeger
2008-Dec-19, 12:41 AM
This is Charles Hapgood/Immanuel Velikovsky nonsense. The idea is that somehow the Earth's crust is an incredibly strong, single unit floating on an essentially frictionless surface, and that some force can somehow rapidly change the rotation or angle of rotation of the entire crust as a unit, but somehow not the core, mantle or oceans.

It's not just ridiculous, but painfully ridiculous.

My bold.
Apparently Hans posted this verbatim on Abovetopsecret. Maybe he should give you credit?
:think:

JerryInWales
2008-Dec-21, 08:50 AM
H G Wells explored the consequences of suddenly changing the Earth's rotation - see "The Man Who COuld Work Miracles".

mugaliens
2008-Dec-21, 12:33 PM
This is very much like another thread created by Stephanie...

xfahctor
2008-Dec-21, 04:08 PM
I assume what they may have been refering to in a more complicated way, is momentum, like water in a bowl, you swing the bowl and suddenly stop, but the water keeps going. I realize, for reason i don't completely understand, doesn't apply to the earth, but I imagine this is where they got the idea.