PDA

View Full Version : Oxidation



tinyking
2008-Dec-21, 10:01 PM
Hi! Can someone tell me, is it possible to have oxidation in the atmosphere?

Nick Theodorakis
2008-Dec-21, 10:09 PM
Yes, but your question is vague enough that I suspect you are looking for something a little more specific. Care to elaborate?

Nick

tinyking
2008-Dec-21, 10:30 PM
Sry!, I meant is it possible to have oxidation with only oxygen, methane, and other chemicals that the atmosphere already have? I am sorry if I confuse anyone.

korjik
2008-Dec-21, 10:47 PM
Answer is still yes. Generally not real fast, if I remember right.

John Jaksich
2008-Dec-21, 11:11 PM
Hello,

Oxidation may also occur via ozonolysis by the O3 molecule--this mechanism is very efficient and as most of us are aware---a major component in city smog. Besides, it is harmful to those with lung issues. Ozone has been known to oxidize multiple bonds in synthetic and naturally-occurring rubber--thus "crumbling" the polymer.

There is also the issue ( for which Rowland and Molina won the Nobel ) for disappearing ozone at the poles---this is also an oxidation/reduction (via free radicals) type reaction

Hornblower
2008-Dec-22, 12:22 AM
Compounds of nitrogen and oxygen are generated by lightning. I would call that oxidation.

Nick Theodorakis
2008-Dec-22, 01:36 AM
Sry!, I meant is it possible to have oxidation with only oxygen, methane, and other chemicals that the atmosphere already have? I am sorry if I confuse anyone.

If you have free molecular oxygen, then you will have oxidation. Oxygen will react with sulfur and sulfides, such as those emitted by volcanoes, to form sulfates; metals are oxidized, such as iron to iron oxides. Ozone formed from oxygen by UV light or electric discharge is even more reactive.

Nick

tinyking
2008-Dec-22, 09:13 AM
If you have free molecular oxygen, then you will have oxidation. Oxygen will react with sulfur and sulfides, such as those emitted by volcanoes, to form sulfates; metals are oxidized, such as iron to iron oxides. Ozone formed from oxygen by UV light or electric discharge is even more reactive.

Nick

I think I kinda got it. So does that means if there is sulfur and sulfides in the atmosphere, oxidation will occur to form sulfates? sulfur in the atmosphere can be done by human activities, but where do I find sulfides?

Ivan Viehoff
2008-Dec-22, 11:15 AM
There is unlikely to be much free sulphur in the atmosphere, because (elemental)sulphur is a solid at normal temperatures and pressures. It might occasionally be released into the air as a solid aerosol from volcanoes and crop-spraying activities.

Hydrogen sulphide is released into the atmosphere from oil seeps (it is dissolved in crude oil), volcanic vents, and from certain biological decomposition processes. But it doesn't last very long, so its concentration is very low and localised. In fact there is so little of it, that it is not even listed in the minor constituents of the atmosphere here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth%27s_atmosphere

The atmosphere is also rather good at oxidising stuff like iron and steel.

Nick Theodorakis
2008-Dec-23, 01:28 AM
Sry!, I meant is it possible to have oxidation with only oxygen, methane, and other chemicals that the atmosphere already have? I am sorry if I confuse anyone.

I was just thinking: how much oxygen and methane are in your hypothetical atmosphere? If there is enough of both, it might make one heckuva bonfire if there is a lightning strike.

Nick