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Sticks
2008-Dec-27, 01:50 PM
Sometimes it is possible to answer a question someone asks by quoting from a popular sci-fi tv show or film.

I did this on Christmas Day at my sister's house. Her son had been given a cheap version of laser-quest and so my brother-in-law was playing it with him.

From what I can make out, you have four lives before your system goes down. Each life is represented by a small led light

Can you see where I am going with this? ;)

My brother in-law asked me how many lights were showing on his headset, and all four lights were showing, so naturally I replied with appropriate inflection for this STNG quote "There are four lights"

To my surprise he actually realised where the quote came from

IIRC episode two of Chain of Command

Anyone else got away with something like this?

Chuck
2008-Dec-27, 03:02 PM
I've used and heard "Resistance is futile" many times over the years. Also the "I am your father" from Star Wars. There are probably others but I can't think of them right now. I've never heard anyone use the four lights quote. I hear "Beam me up, Scotty" although I've also heard that it's not really an actual line from Star Trek.

Seeka
2008-Dec-27, 04:10 PM
I have not heard of that one sticks, but have heard and used all of yours chuck! Im always saying Picards 'Make it so'. So sad!

Romanus
2008-Dec-27, 04:17 PM
I'm a terrible sucker for movie quotes. Just a few I've used with friends:

"What's up with all that churning and bubbling? You call that a radar screen?"

"When will then be now?"

"[He's 'comin' in'.] I feel safer already!"

"Ripley, let's go!" [Must say this with a shrill British accent. ;) ]

"He doesn't like you. I don't like you either. You'd better watch yourself."

"There she is! There she is! And not so wounded as we were led to believe."

"Fear is the mind-killer."

Chuck
2008-Dec-27, 04:20 PM
Mustn't forget "KHAN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"

Also, McCoy's "I'm a doctor, not a <fill in undesirable job here>", although sometimes people replace doctor with their own professions.

I haven't heard anyone use "Make it so."

Buttercup
2008-Dec-27, 04:20 PM
Well I don't want to hear this, but I've always wondered if/when I'll overhear one of the docs I work for saying "He's dead, Jim."

Sticks
2008-Dec-27, 04:27 PM
When I used to work for a software company (Now defunct) on support, fixing faults in our product, when ever a fault was reported by a client, we referred to them as fault logs.

Sometimes, the head of section would be looking for a specific fault log report and accompanying paper work.

It was then would would sometimes get , "These are not the logs you are looking for"

Chuck
2008-Dec-27, 04:35 PM
I forgot about "He's dead, Jim." I've heard "It's dead, Jim" when talking about a computer.

slang
2008-Dec-28, 12:46 AM
I've use the "I felt a great disturbance in the Force, as if millions of voices suddenly cried out in terror and were suddenly silenced. <insert or imply applicable disaster>" quote in conversations. A quick google shows I'm not alone... where's that cliche thread again? :)

Oh, and lets not forget the "nuke it from orbit". Very useful.

Tinaa
2008-Dec-28, 12:50 AM
I've started a new thing with my 7th and 8th graders. Instead of the peace sign I shoot them the Vulcan peace sign. It is quite funny that I have more than half the middle schoolers giving me and others the Vulcan peace sign.

They have absolutely no idea what it means but they are saying "Live long and prosper." It is great!

Chuck
2008-Dec-28, 01:03 AM
"Danger, Will Robinson" is one that I'm ashamed to have used.

PetersCreek
2008-Dec-28, 01:21 AM
"Danger, Will Robinson" is one that I'm ashamed to have used.

But were you waving your arms about when you said it? I'm almost ashamed to say that I have.

I got to use "It's dead, Jim" when I was working in avionics maintenance, on a system that was pretty much dead, with a coworker named Jim.

Let's not forget...

"I've got a bad feeling about this."
"The force is strong with this one."
"You wouldn't like me when I'm angry."

Chuck
2008-Dec-28, 01:25 AM
Unfortunately I was typing at work and unable to wave my hands. I also didn't say "It's dead, Jim" to an actual Jim. Maybe I'll try to get them right in the future.

kleindoofy
2008-Dec-28, 01:35 AM
"I'm sorry Dave, I can't do that" comes in handy every now and then.

When a computer is not responding as expected, a friend of mine likes to pick up the mouse and speak into it: "hello, computer?" (Star Trek IV)

I got into an elevator with a few friends once and it seemed that everybody was expecting somebody else to push the button. After a few seconds someone in the back said "computer, lobby!" which cracked everybody up.

Chuck
2008-Dec-28, 02:00 AM
I've also used the Terminator "I'll be back" but I don't do Arnold very well.

Sticks
2008-Dec-28, 04:02 AM
I've started a new thing with my 7th and 8th graders. Instead of the peace sign I shoot them the Vulcan peace sign. It is quite funny that I have more than half the middle schoolers giving me and others the Vulcan peace sign.

They have absolutely no idea what it means but they are saying "Live long and prosper." It is great!


Actually on leaving cards, I always wite, "Live Long and Prosper" and see if anyone ever guess where that is from :whistle:

Ara Pacis
2008-Dec-28, 08:13 AM
Some of these are snowclones, some existed in normal parlance before they were enshrined in sci-fi, and some are just normal constructions of the language.

Unless you used some sort of unusual inflection, I can't imagine "there are four lights" being linked to any sort of popular culture reference. Maybe I just not geeky enough.

geonuc
2008-Dec-28, 12:58 PM
I've been known to say "something wonderful" on occasion. Usually gets a strange look, mainly because of my lame attempt to sound like Dave Bowman.

Sticks
2008-Dec-28, 04:45 PM
Some of these are snowclones, some existed in normal parlance before they were enshrined in sci-fi, and some are just normal constructions of the language.

Unless you used some sort of unusual inflection, I can't imagine "there are four lights" being linked to any sort of popular culture reference. Maybe I just not geeky enough.

In the episode, Picard was captured by a Cardassian who was torturing him, and on showing him four lights, insisted there were five, and kept asking Picard how many lights there were, and onishing him when he did not give five as the answer. At the end the Cardassian was ordered by his superiors to release Piccard, and at that point Piccard in a defiant emotional state says the line "There are four lights"

When I said it, I used the same inflection as was used on the episode.

It was impressive that my brother in law recognised how the way I had answered his question as coming from a STNG episode, and hilarious that he had walked straight into asking the question so I could do that.

Seeka
2008-Dec-28, 05:17 PM
I remember that episode Sticks.

Can't believe nobody has heard of Cpt Picard saying "Make it so"!

Paul Beardsley
2008-Dec-28, 05:32 PM
There's a very nice moment in the TV series Extras in which Ricky Gervais' character meets Patrick Stewart. Ricky asks Stewart to do him a favour. Stewart promises him he will "make it so." Ricky thanks him, but it is clear from his response that he does not recognise Stewart's jokey use of the line.

Stewart queries this, and Ricky admits he never watches Star Trek. Stewart looks at Ricky, noting he is overweight, middle aged, doesn't have a girlfriend - and yet he's not a Star Trek fan. "Astonishing," he concludes.

mike alexander
2008-Dec-28, 06:04 PM
A few weeks ago a friend asked me how, collectively, the economy could have gotten into such a mess. And I replied, "We live in the lovely quiet and the dark."

Paul Beardsley
2008-Dec-28, 06:39 PM
We could combine this thread with the literary quote one! "That's John Varley's Persistence of Vision!"

I recall an occasion on some computer system or other when some old files had been restored, and recent ones deleted. I turned to my wife and said, "We've gone back in time!" (A generic quote from several SF stories, of course.) Both of us would so love to time travel that I took great delight in using it for a quite ordinary occasion.

Romanus
2008-Dec-28, 07:34 PM
One quote that I've been infatuated with is from the first Robot Chicken Star Wars special, which I say to myself whenever I'm looking for something:

Grand Moff Tarkin: "Not in here! Not in there! I wonder where Vader is?"*

*This is a special features storyboard sketch that was never animated. You have to be there. ;)

Jay200MPH
2008-Dec-28, 08:19 PM
I like to scream "get to the choppaaaaaahhh!!" whenever it's appropriate.

- J

Chuck
2008-Dec-28, 08:40 PM
I'm still waiting for a chance to use "Take your stinking paws off me, you damn dirty ape!" Maybe when the cops come to arrest me for something.

Swift
2008-Dec-28, 11:41 PM
In addition to many of the ones listed here (and I've used them myself), I find myself using "frack" (the curse word from Battlestar Galactica) fairly frequently as a "safe" alternative. And there are a few others I used on rare occasions, including: "DON'T PANIC" and "This must be a new meaning of 'safe' that I have not previously encounted" (sometimes with words other than 'safe'). And from the literature side, I use "TANSTAAFL" once in a while.

Romanus
2008-Dec-28, 11:44 PM
How could I forget "Don't panic!" I use it at least once a day. :)

ABR.
2008-Dec-28, 11:46 PM
Occasionally, when I walk into the lab where we keep our minions chained to their scopes, I mean, where the students work, I will say "Greetings, programs!" None of them has ever mentioned anything about it, but then, most are probably too young to remember Tron .

Delvo
2008-Dec-29, 01:20 AM
A few weeks ago a friend asked me how, collectively, the economy could have gotten into such a mess. And I replied, "We live in the lovely quiet and the dark.""Persistence of Vision"! A rather old novella which was never made into a TV show or movie; there's very very little chance of a random person recognizing that one. I wouldn't want to use a line that people wouldn't recognize. That's what holds me back from using "Immmpressive... most impressive." Almost nobody would know what I was up to unless I followed it with "Obi-Wan has taught you well,", which usually would take too long and make it inapplicable to the given situation.

mike alexander
2008-Dec-29, 01:58 AM
I suppose I pull quotes from stories more often than movies or TV shows. Although there is one chemist at work who always calls me 'old man' and I always reply 'Padawan'.

When an instrument is on the blink and I figure out what's wrong I will occasionally say "Klaatu barada nikto" when I start it back up.

hhEb09'1
2008-Dec-29, 02:07 AM
Invariably, hearing someone refer to a "chronosynclastic infundibulum" causes me to view them in new light. OK, it probably would even if I hadn't read Vonnegut, and weirdly, I'm pretty sure it'd be the same light. :)

"These men do not want a happy ship."

"Books make people unhappy, they make them anti-social."

"I'll do things to you that are beyond all known philosophies! "

"Wait a minute! They can't shrink me."

"A good many dramatic situations begin with screaming."

I can see now where the above phrases might come in handy during day-to-day moderation duties. For each time I use one of them, the first poster to return to this thread and quote it will receive one free BAUT get-out-of-jail card. But you must also identify the movie of origin, all from the sixties and seventies.

Tinaa
2008-Dec-29, 02:11 AM
"Books make people unhappy, they make them anti-social."

Fahrenheit 451

"Wait a minute! They can't shrink me"

Fantastic Voyage - one of my favorites!

Can't guess the others.

KaiYeves
2008-Dec-29, 02:14 AM
I've told my brother repeatedly "I'm an archeologist, not a (insert specialty here)!"

When leaving my parents for the plane trip to Australia, I muttered "Be brave and don't look back." To myself over and over again to keep from getting emotional. (Star Wars: The Phantom Menace)

And it probably doesn't count, but before track meets, I sometimes say "Let's light this candle and go home!"

Salty
2008-Dec-29, 02:29 AM
I can't remember the movie's name, but there was a sci-fi flick with an alien invader, who said "I come in peace".

He always said that, just before he killed somebody or destroyed something.

mike alexander
2008-Dec-29, 04:02 AM
Invariably, hearing someone refer to a "chronosynclastic infundibulum" causes me to view them in new light.

Quite. Just don't ask them the name of the story.

hhEb09'1
2008-Dec-29, 04:28 AM
Can't guess the others.Those two are correct!
Quite. Just don't ask them the name of the story.Also correct

Chuck
2008-Dec-29, 05:42 PM
I also forgot about "Take me to your leader." It's probably been decades since I've use that one. I don't remember if it's from a movie.

closetgeek
2008-Dec-29, 08:47 PM
Actually on leaving cards, I always wite, "Live Long and Prosper" and see if anyone ever guess where that is from :whistle:

We had a guy in our World of Warcraft guild who signed off every time with LLAP. My husband was surprised, he being the Star Wars fan and me being the Trekkie, that I didn't get that he was saying Live Long and Prosper. I have never been very good at that stuff, anyway.

If I am inquiring as to what someone is doing, I will often ask "What are you doing <insert name>?" in my really bad impression of HAL's voice. Although I am not sure if I picked it up from the actual 2001 scene or the mock scene from Airplane II.

I also like to use "But it's a dry heat." from Aliens, whenever possible.

closetgeek
2008-Dec-29, 08:50 PM
I can't remember the movie's name, but there was a sci-fi flick with an alien invader, who said "I come in peace".

He always said that, just before he killed somebody or destroyed something.

Are you talking about the Dolph Lundgrin (not sure on the spelling) movie titled I Come In Peace?

mike alexander
2008-Dec-29, 08:55 PM
"I'll do things to you that are beyond all known philosophies! "

Ah. Barbarella.


I remember seeing it in a theater (probably pronounced thee-A-ter) in South Bend, Indiana. In the row behind us I remember hearing one gent whisper to another, "She's naked as a jaybird!"

Ah, Indiana.

closetgeek
2008-Dec-29, 09:06 PM
I am sure everyone does the Jedi-mind-controlling-handwave thingy when things don't go their way, too.

hhEb09'1
2008-Dec-29, 09:12 PM
Ah. Barbarella.So's one of the others.

The last one was late seventies.

Fazor
2008-Dec-29, 09:16 PM
I tend to not use direct quotes, rather than alter them to something different but recognizable. But, I also tend to do that in order to make an innocent line ... "blue", so I'll leave out any examples.

Chuck
2008-Dec-29, 09:18 PM
I have done the My Favorite Martian fingers to the head while mind reading bit, but that was when the TV series was first aired.

ParaDoctor
2008-Dec-29, 10:12 PM
Hmm, can RoboCop be considered an Excessive Machine? Anyway, thank you for your cooperation. :D

Two quotes from the same movie? Sneaky, sneaky. ;)

Romanus
2008-Dec-29, 11:34 PM
My boss uses the "One of us" line from I, Robot all the time.

tdvance
2008-Dec-30, 01:45 AM
it's a single-word rather than a quote, but "Grok" is still used by a moderately-sized subset of society. So is "...but on the gripping hand...", often by people where I work, proving either the Moties escaped, or else they merely read the same book I did. Oh yeah, "There Ain't No Such Thing as a Free Lunch", originally Heinlein.

ParaDoctor
2008-Dec-30, 02:27 AM
"Grok" ... "...but on the gripping hand..." ... "There Ain't No Such Thing as a Free Lunch"Googling BAUT yields 47, 92 and 125 hits, respectively. :)

Ara Pacis
2008-Dec-30, 08:00 AM
I also like to use "But it's a dry heat." from Aliens, whenever possible.I thought that was from Arizona.


I am sure everyone does the Jedi-mind-controlling-handwave thingy when things don't go their way, too. No, but I do it as I'm walking through automatic doors.

I'd heard of "There Ain't No Such Thing as a Free Lunch" long before I had heard of Heinlein or read TMIaHM, though it wasn't until then that I became familiar with the acronym, TANSTAAFL.

hhEb09'1
2008-Dec-30, 01:56 PM
I'd heard of "There Ain't No Such Thing as a Free Lunch" long before I had heard of Heinlein or read TMIaHM, though it wasn't until then that I became familiar with the acronym, TANSTAAFL.When did you first hear of it? Before 1966?

Chuck
2008-Dec-30, 02:02 PM
In Arizona, we say "It's a dry heat" to attract the tourists who then scurry from one air conditioned building to another.

ParaDoctor
2008-Dec-30, 02:12 PM
When did you first hear of it? Before 1966?

Outside hacker circles the variant TINSTAAFL (“There is No Such Thing...”) is apparently more common, and can be traced back to 1952 in the writings of ethicist Alvin Hansen. TANSTAAFL may well have arisen from it by mutation.entry TANSTAAFL (http://catb.org/jargon/html/T/TANSTAAFL.html)

originating in the 1940s and later popularized by [...] HeinleinThe Wikipedia article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TINSTAAFL) traces the "free lunch" expression back to the 19th century.

hhEb09'1
2008-Dec-30, 02:44 PM
The Wikipedia article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TINSTAAFL) traces the "free lunch" expression back to the 19th century.Interesting. That wiki article even seems to include an image of a cover for TANSTAAFL: a plan for a new economic world order, written by Pierre Dos Utt in 1949.

Even better, a footnote says
In 1950, a New York Times columnist ascribed the phrase to economist (and Army General) Leonard P. Ayres of the Cleveland Trust Company. "It seems that shortly before the General's death [in 1946]... a group of reporters approached the general with the request that perhaps he might give them one of several immutable economic truisms which he had gathered from his long years of economic study... 'It is an immutable economic fact,' said the general, 'that there is no such thing as a free lunch.'"

Ara Pacis
2008-Dec-30, 02:48 PM
When did you first hear of it? Before 1966?

Them's Pre-AP days. Perhaps I heard it from ye olde media.

tdvance
2008-Dec-30, 02:58 PM
gee--I guess Heinlein, like Yogi Berra, didn't say (first) half the things he said! Ok--doesn't sound so witty with the "first".