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View Full Version : Are there any live webcams out in space?



Ross PK81
2009-Jan-08, 03:08 PM
I've tried doing a Google search, but I can't really find any.

jrkeller
2009-Jan-08, 03:28 PM
There are webcam type cameras on the space station, but I don't if they are publically available.

Fazor
2009-Jan-08, 03:31 PM
They quit broadcasting them because most users were disapointed to find out that despite what their NASA bio page says, the astronauts are really overweight older men who decorate the shuttles interor to look like their mother's basements.

:)

jrkeller
2009-Jan-08, 03:32 PM
Here's a page of live webcams of Kennedy Space Center

http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/countdown/video/

ToSeek
2009-Jan-08, 03:38 PM
Wasn't that what Al Gore's satellite (which is currently sitting in a warehouse not far from where I am right now) supposed to do?

Fazor
2009-Jan-08, 03:40 PM
Wait, wasn't this thread in OTB? :confused: I wouldn't have put the joking reference to internet misrepresentation and web-cammery in if I knew it was in Q&A. Did it move, or do I just need my coffee more desperately than I had realized.

ETA: Ah, musta just happened to catch it in process. There wasn't the mod comment yet, and didn't see the "moved to" link in the original subsection when I posted this. Now both are there.

...err, actually it wasn't in process. I'm just psychic. Anyone have Randi's number? I could use that money. :)

ToSeek
2009-Jan-08, 03:44 PM
Moved from OTB to Q&A.

jrkeller
2009-Jan-08, 09:49 PM
Wasn't that what Al Gore's satellite (which is currently sitting in a warehouse not far from where I am right now) supposed to do?


Sort of,

The Triana project would have put a satellite at the L1 location so that you get a continuous view of the sunlit portion of the Earth.

Larry Jacks
2009-Jan-08, 09:59 PM
They later added some useful scientific instruments to the Triana satellite (so it would be more than a wallpaper generator) but it was never launched. IIRC, Triana was designed to be launched on the Shuttle but that would've been against the laws or regulations that require government satellites be launched on commercial boosters such as the Delta or Atlas.

Here's a report (http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/oig/hq/old/inspections_assessments/g-99-013.pdf) on the problems with Triana. It was a boondoggle that cost many million dollars and will almost certainly never fly. That's unfortunate. If it hadn't been done in such a hamfisted manner in response to political pressure, the scientific instruments could've provided worthwhile data.

mugaliens
2009-Jan-09, 06:53 PM
It would be nice to have high-res webcams of Earth. Say, about 24? (GPS) At about 1920x1080 resolution?

With 4 satellites in 6 orbits, that gives us 6 intersection points for the first 3 orthogonal orbits, 6 for the second 3 orthoganol orbits, but a total of 24 intersections between the two sets of orbits. Thus, the total number of intersections is 6+6+24, or 36 (some spherical geometrist check my figuring, here, please - thanks!)

Besides, the Earth is orbiting beneath this hotbed of activity.

My point is that with that much coverage, and with each image sent taking up about 1 MB, each satellite would only have to broadcast approximately three images per hour.

The data could be fed to a server which simple aggregates the data, preferring the later images over the earlier ones (unless there are gaps), then morphing it into a real-time Google Earth, albeit one with much lower resolution than Google Earth.

It'd be great for following weather, though! And since most CCDs can see into both IR and UV, it could take a high-res vis pic, immediately followed by two low-res IR and UV pics.

Jeff Root
2009-Jan-10, 03:13 AM
Quite a few years ago I saw a reciever getting a slow-scan TV image from
an AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation) satellite. I often see live
or recorded feeds from the Shuttle and/or ISS at least during and shortly
after Shuttle flights, on NASA TV. I would bet almost anything that both
are carried on the web.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

mugaliens
2009-Jan-10, 07:37 PM
NASA TV is a web-broadcast by NASA. Not the same thing as I was thinking, though.

NEOWatcher
2009-Jan-12, 02:29 PM
...The data could be fed to a server which simple aggregates the data, preferring the later images over the earlier ones (unless there are gaps), then morphing it into a real-time Google Earth, albeit one with much lower resolution than Google Earth.
So what is Google Earth missing that you are looking for?

It seems like any non-geosynch sat would have the issues that Google currently has as explained here (http://www.webpronews.com/topnews/2008/02/08/are-google-earth-images-in-real-time).

There's also plenty of weather sat links.
There's also this one from Discovery (http://dsc.discovery.com/guides/discovery-earth-live/discovery-earth-live.html).

Besides, what do you expect to see changing on such a small window of time?

01101001
2009-Jan-12, 07:06 PM
Universe Today: Mars Express Webcam -- Big Brother is Watching Over the Red Planet (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/08/23/big-brother-is-watching-over-the-red-planet/)

ESA: The Mars Webcam (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/VMC/SEM4SJEVL2F_0.html)