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Sy2100
2009-Jan-09, 09:56 PM
How would fish do in space?

antoniseb
2009-Jan-09, 10:16 PM
I'm assuming you are asking about whether fish could thrive in a tank of water kept at a habitable temperature, and given food. I suspect that as long as the water remained oxygenated, and you had snails to clean the tank, things would be fine. I don't know if any tests have been done.

m1omg
2009-Jan-09, 10:16 PM
:lol:

Swift
2009-Jan-09, 10:43 PM
NASA webpage (http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/9-12/features/F_Animals_in_Space_9-12.html) about animal experiments in space - for students, but has some info on the behavior of fish

What are some of the results of animals in orbit? Fish and tadpoles swim in loops, rather than straight lines, because there is no up or down to orient them, Lewis says. If a light shines, the fish use that as their guide source and swim towards the light.

Details about a tank for fish flown on STS-90 (http://lis.arc.nasa.gov/lis3/Hardware_Appendix/VFEU.html)

Florida museum of natural history webpage (http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/InNews/space2007.html) about some fish experiments

speedfreek
2009-Jan-09, 10:57 PM
I'm assuming you are asking about whether fish could thrive in a tank of water kept at a habitable temperature, and given food.

I'm not making that assumption! :)

http://www.bautforum.com/astronomy/9214-exploding-fish.html

Buttercup
2009-Jan-09, 11:16 PM
Tilapia on Mars. It's been suggested (if/when a colony is ever established there).

KaiYeves
2009-Jan-10, 02:03 AM
They have flow some fish on the shuttle in experiments. I guess the trick is not to let the water escape the tank.

Ara Pacis
2009-Jan-11, 03:11 AM
Flying fish? Sounds like a bad movie. Oh wait, It already is (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piranha_II:_The_Spawning).

mugaliens
2009-Jan-11, 10:03 PM
Long ago I read somewhere that fish in zero G don't actually need water. A 100% humidity environment would work fine.

Does that pass the sanity test? Mobility would be somewhat reduced, but how much mobility do goldfish in a tank actually need, anyway???

Ara Pacis
2009-Jan-11, 11:17 PM
Long ago I read somewhere that fish in zero G don't actually need water. A 100% humidity environment would work fine.

Does that pass the sanity test? Mobility would be somewhat reduced, but how much mobility do goldfish in a tank actually need, anyway???

I don't know. Some aquatic invertebrates may be able to go that, but fish may be limited by their ability to force air through their gills. Wouldn't surface tension tend to clump the gills together and limit their surface area and gas exchange capacity?

mugaliens
2009-Jan-12, 07:34 PM
I don't know. Some aquatic invertebrates may be able to go that, but fish may be limited by their ability to force air through their gills. Wouldn't surface tension tend to clump the gills together and limit their surface area and gas exchange capacity?

I'm not sure of what surface tension remains in a fully saturated environment. Hasn't stopped the fish I've caught from trying, though they may have been struggling mightily to open those gills against surface tension, whereas underwater it's cake to just gulp it through.

As for how fish would do in zero g, I can imagine that with some lemon and pepper, perhaps in an alcohol flambe' (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IJ74IvpBlU&feature=related)they'd do just fine. :)

KaiYeves
2009-Jan-13, 12:09 AM
Flying fish? Sounds like a bad movie. Oh wait, It already is.
James Cameron is one strange, strange guy...

Ara Pacis
2009-Jan-13, 03:14 PM
I'm not sure of what surface tension remains in a fully saturated environment. Hasn't stopped the fish I've caught from trying, though they may have been struggling mightily to open those gills against surface tension, whereas underwater it's cake to just gulp it through.

As for how fish would do in zero g, I can imagine that with some lemon and pepper, perhaps in an alcohol flambe' (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IJ74IvpBlU&feature=related)they'd do just fine. :)

That's an interesting thought, but I suspect that surface tension still remains. If the air was fully saturated or super saturated, you'd get fog. Maybe you can experiment with some wet plastic wrap when next in the shower to see if it still sticks. Maybe it would help the fish for a while, but I suspect that they wouldn't be able to force enough air through, compressible and all. Maybe it would be more dependent on oxygenation of what little gill capacity is actually usable in that situation. Would salinity might be a problem?

mugaliens
2009-Jan-13, 05:59 PM
That's an interesting thought, but I suspect that surface tension still remains. If the air was fully saturated or super saturated, you'd get fog. Maybe you can experiment with some wet plastic wrap when next in the shower to see if it still sticks. Maybe it would help the fish for a while, but I suspect that they wouldn't be able to force enough air through, compressible and all. Maybe it would be more dependent on oxygenation of what little gill capacity is actually usable in that situation. Would salinity might be a problem?

True, you'd have a fog, but unlike a cold fog that keeps condensing as the air cools, it would be relatively light, particularly for the small volume of a fish tank.

The mix could simply be super-oxygenated, which would take care of much of the problem.

Plastic wrap in the shower? No thanks!

You may encounter other problems, even if the fish is getting enough oxygen. The fish may require gill slits to completely open to avoid disease.

BigDon
2009-Jan-13, 07:28 PM
NASA webpage (http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/9-12/features/F_Animals_in_Space_9-12.html) about animal experiments in space - for students, but has some info on the behavior of fish


Details about a tank for fish flown on STS-90 (http://lis.arc.nasa.gov/lis3/Hardware_Appendix/VFEU.html)

Florida museum of natural history webpage (http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/InNews/space2007.html) about some fish experiments

Okay, I lost it at: FPCU. Fish Package Control Unit. sounds like something from an Onion article.

RalofTyr
2009-Jan-19, 08:17 PM
If there are fish on Europa, they should be a few freeze dried in orbit around Jupiter. Since meteor impacts on Europa would blow a few into orbit.

George
2009-Jan-19, 08:38 PM
"There be whales (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NGC_4631)...!"

Ronald Brak
2009-Jan-20, 03:05 AM
Those beautiful feathery fish gills will clump up out of water, but get tiny fish, so small that considerable oxygen diffuses through their skin. then scoop them out of water and put them in a box full of cool humid oxygen. Breed those that survive, repeat multiple times ans shoot them into space. I don't know what the practical applications of waterless tolerant gilled fish are, that's for engineers to work out.

Whirlpool
2009-Jan-20, 04:39 AM
There is something fishy going on here ........:think:

ryanmercer
2009-Jan-21, 11:40 AM
Hrmmm I hate reading threads like this before work, becuase all day long I'll be thinking about it instead of working hahha

mugaliens
2009-Jan-22, 06:42 PM
At least you can provide a legitimate excuse when Mr. Clark reads "fish" eleven times in your report on "Automating Sizing Presorts for Global Cargo Distribution!"

"...next, the scanner fishes the package from the que..."

"...while years ago this information was stored on microfiche...."

"...include packages requiring active cooling, such as those containing fresh fish..."