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Charlie in Dayton
2003-Nov-17, 06:59 AM
The straight scoop is that the Leonid peak is due around 2AM Eastern Time here in Ohio. The word is, don't point the camera straight at Leo - aim off to one side maybe 45 degrees or so, to get those looooooong trails. Okay - 45 degrees off WHICH WAY? Where do I point the camera?

I've got an adapter coming to mount the 35mm camera to an equatorial mount with a clock drive on it. Hopefully, I'll get out to the dark sky site right after work and get polar aligned/set up real quick...

But - where do I point the camera?

EckJerome
2003-Nov-17, 06:46 PM
The straight scoop is that the Leonid peak is due around 2AM Eastern Time here in Ohio. The word is, don't point the camera straight at Leo - aim off to one side maybe 45 degrees or so, to get those looooooong trails. Okay - 45 degrees off WHICH WAY? Where do I point the camera?


The point is to not point directly at Leo...45 degrees off in ANY direction will do. Meteors can appear anywhere in the sky, just that the trails are usually shorter the closer they are to the radiant point.

This feeds into the ubiquitous bit of BA in almost every media report of meteor showers in which naive news people tell you to look toward a certain point in the sky. In fact, the most spectacular meteors are usually NOT in that particular direction, but rather off 45 to 90 degrees all around that point. (Though, really, meteors can and will be seen in EVERY part of the sky.)

Imagine the apparent path of a pitched baseball from the vantage points of the homeplate umpire and the dugout...from which direction will the ball's path appear to be longer? Same idea...when staring directly at Leo, you are behind the plate staring right at the pitcher.

Eric

SeanF
2003-Nov-17, 07:26 PM
The straight scoop is that the Leonid peak is due around 2AM Eastern Time here in Ohio. The word is, don't point the camera straight at Leo - aim off to one side maybe 45 degrees or so, to get those looooooong trails. Okay - 45 degrees off WHICH WAY? Where do I point the camera?


The point is to not point directly at Leo...45 degrees off in ANY direction will do.

Well, not any direction. Depending on where Leo is in the sky, 45 degrees in the wrong direction and you're looking at the ground! ;)

Kaptain K
2003-Nov-17, 07:59 PM
Draw a circle (imaginary) on the sky around the radiant. Pick the point on this circle that is farthest from the horizon (unless that happens to be where the Moon is, in which case, you have to compromise).

EckJerome
2003-Nov-17, 08:18 PM
Well, not any direction. Depending on where Leo is in the sky, 45 degrees in the wrong direction and you're looking at the ground! ;)

Silly me, I've got this nasty habit of not stating the obvious. :wink:

SeanF
2003-Nov-17, 08:37 PM
Well, not any direction. Depending on where Leo is in the sky, 45 degrees in the wrong direction and you're looking at the ground! ;)

Silly me, I've got this nasty habit of not stating the obvious. :wink:

Don't you think that goes without saying? ;)

Charlie in Dayton
2003-Nov-19, 04:15 AM
Well, it's a moot point, seeing as the sky is clouded over, and the clouds are busily engaged in drizzling all over everything...but I'll be ready next time! Just may expend a roll of 200 speed fillum on some tracking exercisesout in front of the house...

SarahMc
2003-Nov-19, 04:31 AM
Well, it's a moot point, seeing as the sky is clouded over, and the clouds are busily engaged in drizzling all over everything...but I'll be ready next time! Just may expend a roll of 200 speed fillum on some tracking exercisesout in front of the house...

Don't feel bad Charlie, I'm in the exact same situation. Worse yet, it looks like I'll be under the clouds for a couple weeks.

Gsquare
2003-Nov-19, 05:21 AM
Well, it's a moot point, seeing as the sky is clouded over,
You could always try for the ones that make it below the cloud cover! he he; just kidding. :D :wink:



Just may expend a roll of 200 speed fillum on some tracking exercises out in front of the house...

What are doing using such a slow speed; :o I always used asa 400 or better. You gotta get sensitivity and wide angles for these slippery devils.
:D
G^2

Charlie in Dayton
2003-Nov-19, 06:44 AM
Well, it's a moot point, seeing as the sky is clouded over,
You could always try for the ones that make it below the cloud cover! he he; just kidding. :D :wink:



Just may expend a roll of 200 speed fillum on some tracking exercises out in front of the house...

What are doing using such a slow speed; :o I always used asa 400 or better. You gotta get sensitivity and wide angles for these slippery devils.
:D
G^2

1. Still learning.
2. That's what's in the camera already.
3. Someone gave it to me, so it's no big deal.
4. Grain.
5. 50mm and 28mm lenses.
6. I got a good processor who knows how to develop astrophotos, so I'm not worried.
7. 200 sounds good for time exposures - I can go longer on the exposure before the sky fog comes in.

1 - 7...(I hope...)... 8-[