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Swift
2009-Jan-26, 02:27 PM
Sorry folks. You all were being well behaved, no warnings or anything, but too much of that discussion involved words that were not kid friendly, on several different continents. We had complaints.

I've just removed the entire thread and started new. Please confine the discussion to things you would discuss in front of a group of eight year olds.

It was hard to pull out the few posts that were unquestionable, but if someone insists, I'll try to move them back into this thread. Send me a PM with your request.

korjik
2009-Jan-26, 07:15 PM
Are y'all fixin' to restart this here thread?

:)

novaderrik
2009-Jan-26, 07:31 PM
ya, you betcha..

WaxRubiks
2009-Jan-26, 07:52 PM
'faucet'


now there's a word we in the UK, don't use.

Chunky
2009-Jan-26, 08:11 PM
years ago i saw a town called [removed] on the news 0.o

no lie.

Chunky
2009-Jan-26, 08:11 PM
whats the point of this thread?

nauthiz
2009-Jan-26, 08:14 PM
I think the point is to keep it from getting closed like the last one by not making posts like #5. ;)

Moose
2009-Jan-26, 08:23 PM
I think the point is to keep it from getting closed like the last one by not making posts like #5. ;)

You would be correct.

Johnathan, please refrain from comments that would be inappropriate to make in the hearing of school-aged children.

Chunky
2009-Jan-26, 08:27 PM
You would be correct.

Johnathan, please refrain from comments that would be inappropriate to make in the hearing of school-aged children.
sorry..

[phonetic descriptions of the offending word removed]

cosmocrazy
2009-Jan-26, 09:59 PM
A few popular ones

Trunk - USA
Boot - UK

Hood - USA
Bonnet - UK

Gasoline -USA
Petrol - UK

korjik
2009-Jan-26, 10:09 PM
'faucet'


now there's a word we in the UK, don't use.

what do you use?

nauthiz
2009-Jan-26, 10:10 PM
I think the new goal of this thread is to try and get the ratio of purple text to black text down below 1.0. . .



For whatever reason, I've always thought eavesdrop vs. gutter was an interesting regional variation.

There was a great one related to a regional chain of building supply stores that, sadly, I don't think I can share. Maybe those of you who have lived in the midwestern USA know what I'm talking about, though.

chrissy
2009-Jan-26, 10:35 PM
what do you use?


We use "taps". ;)

cosmocrazy
2009-Jan-26, 10:35 PM
what do you use?

Tap

Moose
2009-Jan-26, 10:38 PM
It's funny, you can pretty much flip a coin on any of those word pairs as to whether Canadians use the UK or US word (or spelling, for that matter.) We tend to use US terminology when there's a choice, but it's by no means an absolute thing. We use "taps", for example.

nauthiz
2009-Jan-26, 10:52 PM
I use them both, but they have more specific meanings. The faucet is the bit the water comes out of, and the tap is the turny bit that makes the water come out.

Jim
2009-Jan-26, 10:53 PM
Folks here seem to use tap and faucet. Tap is used in everyday speech; faucet is more formal and found on the boxes.

Well, pfaucet.

Nick Theodorakis
2009-Jan-26, 10:54 PM
Folks here seem to use tap and faucet. Tap is used in everyday speech; faucet is more formal and found on the boxes.

Well, pfaucet.

And in some parts of the US they use spigots.

Nick

nauthiz
2009-Jan-26, 10:58 PM
I use that one, too. It's a spigot if it's outdoors. It's a faucet if it's indoors.

PetersCreek
2009-Jan-26, 11:21 PM
I grew up using the term faucet as well...except outside. That was a spigot or a water bib.

Euniculus
2009-Jan-26, 11:24 PM
Johnathan, please refrain from comments that would be inappropriate to make in the hearing of school-aged children.


School aged children know words that would make a sailor blush. Playground talk ain't PC.

Obviously the board owner makes the rules and while I don't advocate channeling George Carlin, the youngest BAUT members are probably Jr High aged and spewing more filth than you or I could ever hope to.

Moose
2009-Jan-26, 11:38 PM
The rationale is mostly to keep BAUT from being added to school nanny filters. I happen to know that we have gotten added to at least one that I'm aware of.

mike alexander
2009-Jan-26, 11:40 PM
I think spigot sounds like some form of pasta.

'Crick' vs. 'Creek'.

Euniculus
2009-Jan-26, 11:41 PM
The rationale is mostly to keep BAUT from being added to school nanny filters. I happen to know that we have gotten added to at least one that I'm aware of.

Ah, so this forum is available for browsing at primary/secondary schools?

Euniculus
2009-Jan-26, 11:43 PM
In keeping with the topic.

Gay, Georgia

Intercourse, Pennsylvania

Cart or buggy?

Pancakes or flapjacks?

Roof or Roof (pronounced like rough)

PetersCreek
2009-Jan-26, 11:49 PM
Alaska: snowmachine

Most of the Lower 48 ("Outside") that gets significant snow: snowmobile

My family back home in the Deep South: snow-what?

mugaliens
2009-Jan-26, 11:57 PM
Alaska: snowmachine

I would have thought "snow-what?" would have been the Alaskan response to snowmachine. Don't you get enough of the natural stuff up that way that the idea of making fake stuff is a bit far-fetched?


Most of the Lower 48 ("Outside") that gets significant snow: snowmobile

I've seen snowmobiles in Alaska, too...

Torsten
2009-Jan-26, 11:59 PM
We also call 'em sleds here.

chrissy
2009-Jan-27, 12:00 AM
We have meanings for both flapjacks and pancakes.

pancakes = a batter that is griddled.

flapjacks = made with rolled oats and syrup, boiled in a sauce pan then poured into a tray and cooled.

PetersCreek
2009-Jan-27, 12:04 AM
[/I]

I've seen snowmobiles in Alaska, too...

...which translated into Alaskan is snowmachine. :whistle: Hardly anyone up here calls 'em snowmobiles.

Euniculus
2009-Jan-27, 12:06 AM
We have meanings for both flapjacks and pancakes.

pancakes = a batter that is griddled.

flapjacks = made with rolled oats and syrup, boiled in a sauce pan then poured into a tray and cooled.


They mean the same thing in the US (griddled batter), but which word one uses depends on where one lives.

I've also heard the term hotcakes used as well.

nauthiz
2009-Jan-27, 12:10 AM
Alaska: snowmachine

Around here, a snow machine is a machine for making artificial snow.

Euniculus
2009-Jan-27, 12:55 AM
Around here, a snow machine is a machine for making artificial snow.

or snowcones

Gillianren
2009-Jan-27, 02:41 AM
Ah, so this forum is available for browsing at primary/secondary schools?

That's the hope, anyway. We are, in the end, intended to be an educational resource.

Casus_belli
2009-Jan-27, 03:37 PM
The NE corner of Scotland is home to some weird and wonderous dialects all of which are fairly alike. However, there is a village about 3 miles away from where I live that has its own unique dialect.

A bed is a Bide
A duvet is a puffin
Legs are liegs

Nick Theodorakis
2009-Jan-27, 03:53 PM
BAUTizens who like this thread may be interested in participating (and viewing the results) in The Cambridge Online Survey of World Englishes (http://www.ling.cam.ac.uk/survey/). Registration is required to participate and view the results. The reader is asked to fill out a short questionnaire regarding word usage and pronunciation of specific examples (e.g., "What word(s) do you use in casual speech to address a group of two or more people?"), as well the location in which the reader learned English.

One of the authors had previously done a dialect survey of North American English, which can be viewed here (http://www4.uwm.edu/FLL/linguistics/dialect/index.html), if you (ummm... y'all, you guys?) want to see the type of questions to expect (although the new questionnaire is not nearly so extensive as the old one).

Nick

Gillianren
2009-Jan-27, 06:29 PM
I seem to have been born in a lone, isolated population of people who say "soda," though I'll admit that it's a large lone, isolated population. And then, I moved up here to "pop" territory.

Nick Theodorakis
2009-Jan-27, 06:31 PM
I seem to have been born in a lone, isolated population of people who say "soda," though I'll admit that it's a large lone, isolated population. And then, I moved up here to "pop" territory.

I'm from "soda" country as well.

Nick

novaderrik
2009-Jan-27, 07:52 PM
around here, we are about split down the middle between those who drink pop and those who drink soda.
i prefer pop, myself.. one less syllable to say..

PetersCreek
2009-Jan-27, 08:04 PM
I seem to have been born in a lone, isolated population of people who say "soda,"...

When and where I grew up, it was all "coke", whether or not it was a Coca-Cola product, whether or not it contained cola flavoring. Y'all wanna coke? What kind?

Somewhere along the way...and I'm not sure when or where...I started referring to carbonated soft drinks as "soda".

kleindoofy
2009-Jan-27, 08:33 PM
We use "taps".
When speaking of taps and faucets, one shouldn't forget the bunghole. Just shove that tap right into it.

Despite what Beavis and Butthead may have done to it, bunghole is a perfectly acceptable word for a group of eight year olds. Just look it up in the dictionary. ;)

kleindoofy
2009-Jan-27, 08:41 PM
Pop, soda, coke
The German, Limonade has absolutely nothing to do with English "lemonade." It's a generic word for "pop," "soda," "Coke," or as some say "soft drink."

In my first few weeks in a Germany speaking country (Austria) during a very hot summer many years ago, I heard someone at the table order Limonade and did the same. I was very surprised when I got a Bluna (~Fanta) instead of lemonade.

SeanF
2009-Jan-27, 08:47 PM
Folks here seem to use tap and faucet. Tap is used in everyday speech; faucet is more formal and found on the boxes.
The device is a faucet, but what comes out of it is tap water. Go figure.


Roof or Roof (pronounced like rough)
Yes - but it's not exactly like rough. Although, when I was in high school, we had a teacher from Boston who insisted we were saying it wrong. One of the students demonstrated (drawing on the blackboard, no less) how we were pronouncing it correctly for South Dakota - his explanation involved a golf ball landing on top of a sod house. :)

A different student absolutely refused to respond when she called on him. "My name is 'tahm,' not 'tawm'!"

Question: Do those who pronounce roof with a long o pronounce "boot" and "foot" so they rhyme?

(Oh, and while we're discussing South Dakota, our capital is pronounced "peer." It's not French!)


Alaska: snowmachine

Most of the Lower 48 ("Outside") that gets significant snow: snowmobile

We learned all about that during the last election.... :)

PetersCreek
2009-Jan-27, 08:47 PM
Pop, soda, coke
In my first few weeks in a Germany speaking country (Austria) during a very hot summer many years ago, I heard someone at the table order Limonade and did the same. I was very surprised when I got a Bluna (~Fanta) instead of lemonade.

Something similar happened to me in Germany. I ordered Limon Eis Tee and received a glass of tea with a scoop of lemon sorbet in it. I've never gotten into floats of any kind but I quite liked that one.

mahesh
2009-Jan-27, 09:08 PM
'faucet'
now there's a word we in the UK, don't use.

let's faucet!

my baby takes his taps to his Saturday drama school
for some serious fun tap-dancing!

and we all drip with excited enthusiasm.
then we are drained in the afternoon.

nauthiz
2009-Jan-27, 09:27 PM
Despite what Beavis and Butthead may have done to it, bunghole is a perfectly acceptable word for a group of eight year olds. Just look it up in the dictionary. ;)

That may be, but I still can't tap a keg without making about 39 sophomoric jokes in the process.

kleindoofy
2009-Jan-27, 10:27 PM
... I still can't tap a keg without making about 39 sophomoric jokes in the process.
"I am Cornholio, I need T.P. for my bunghole. You can take me, but you cannot take my bunghole. For I have no bunghole. I am the Great Cornholio."

Ahh, the classics. Move over Shakespeare. ;)

Gillianren
2009-Jan-27, 11:04 PM
(Oh, and while we're discussing South Dakota, our capital is pronounced "peer." It's not French!)

Well, I'm pretty sure it is. It just isn't pronounced in the French way.

Doodler
2009-Jan-28, 01:08 AM
I seem to have been born in a lone, isolated population of people who say "soda," though I'll admit that it's a large lone, isolated population. And then, I moved up here to "pop" territory.

We do "soda" over here on the East Coast, at least this patch of it.

Moose
2009-Jan-28, 01:12 AM
Pop had currency in the Maritimes in the 70s and early 80s. Soda is used quite a bit in conversation, but "soft drink" is what you'll see on our menus.

HenrikOlsen
2009-Jan-28, 02:56 AM
Y'all wanna coke? What kind?
So you can actually get to hear the Y'all wanna coke? What kind? Pepsi. exchange there?

The Supreme Canuck
2009-Jan-28, 03:06 AM
Soda is used quite a bit in conversation, but "soft drink" is what you'll see on our menus.

We usually get "pop" out our way, but "soft drink" it is on menus.

I've got another one. I'm not sure this is true, but I've been told there is a discrepancy between Canada and the US when it comes to the term "to table" something. In Canada, you get the normal US meaning of putting something aside when you table it, but you also get precisely the opposite meaning. It comes up especially when someone on the news is talking about new government legislation - they talk about the government "tabling a bill." Which means putting it before Parliament for consideration, not putting it aside to be dealt with later.

Is this usage also found in American English, or is it completely foreign?

ngc3314
2009-Jan-28, 05:29 AM
We usually get "pop" out our way, but "soft drink" it is on menus.


Interesting - that's the way ('soft drink") I always heard the description growing up in Tennessee. The usage remains current in Alabama, although "fountain drinks" is gaining popularity on menus.

Graybeard6
2009-Jan-28, 05:40 AM
Re: "Table." Early in 1942, British and American staff officers met in Washington to plan the joint war against Germany. The Yanks would present a plan and the Brits would say "Let's table that" and then the talks would get very tense. Actually, I've seen reports of jackets coming off and challenges given.

gzhpcu
2009-Jan-28, 05:42 AM
As far as regional dialects are concerned, in little Switzerland there are tons of regional dialects, especially the Swiss German variants. Not only pronounciation, but actual words as well. Some of the more extreme dialects are very hard to understand, though I am fluent in German and the Zurich Swiss German dialect, as well as Italian. The Italian dialect is basically the same as the Milanese dialect.

PetersCreek
2009-Jan-28, 06:49 AM
So you can actually get to hear the Y'all wanna coke? What kind? Pepsi. exchange there?

I don't remember seeing a lot of Pepsi when I was a kid. RC cola was Coke's biggest competitor where I lived. But yeah, it went pretty much like that and as far as I know, still does today.


Some of the more extreme dialects are very hard to understand, though I am fluent in German and the Zurich Swiss German dialect, as well as Italian.

I can relate. When I lived in Germany, I was the first and only American member of a club in Stuttgart. So, it was learn German or get left out a lot. Toward the end of my time there, I was teetering on the edge of fluency but I still had a great deal of difficulty understanding one member in particular. It finally came up in conversation with other friends in the club and they pretty much said, "Oh, he's from the former East Germany. We can't understand him, either!"

The Supreme Canuck
2009-Jan-28, 07:35 AM
Re: "Table." Early in 1942, British and American staff officers met in Washington to plan the joint war against Germany. The Yanks would present a plan and the Brits would say "Let's table that" and then the talks would get very tense. Actually, I've seen reports of jackets coming off and challenges given.

Well, there you have it. Yet another example of Canadian English occupying a middle ground between American and British usage. Like I say, we retain both meanings, simultaneously. And yet we manage to avoid confusion...

Van Rijn
2009-Jan-28, 07:48 AM
We usually get "pop" out our way, but "soft drink" it is on menus.

I've got another one. I'm not sure this is true, but I've been told there is a discrepancy between Canada and the US when it comes to the term "to table" something. In Canada, you get the normal US meaning of putting something aside when you table it, but you also get precisely the opposite meaning. It comes up especially when someone on the news is talking about new government legislation - they talk about the government "tabling a bill." Which means putting it before Parliament for consideration, not putting it aside to be dealt with later.

Is this usage also found in American English, or is it completely foreign?

Not completely foreign. Here, if you "table it," that refers to ending discussion. But, if you "put it on the table" that means opening it up to discussion. The phrase, "Let's put everything on the table" is pretty common.

The Backroad Astronomer
2009-Jan-28, 08:19 AM
Calias Maine pronounce the s, Calias France do not pronounce the s.

Snowmoblie around here can go by ski-doo as well (I think that is just popular brand).
In Atlantic Canada there are two city names that are similar on is Saint John NB and
the other St John's Nfld. One of my Co-workers son bought a plane ticket to visit during Christmas and accidently bought a ticket for St John's about a thousand miles off.

Tog
2009-Jan-28, 08:48 AM
Here in Utah, soft drinks were always "pop" to the kids I grew up with. I've always called them by name as far as I can recall. The only real exception to this it that I hate Pepsi, so if I go into a new place I'll ask if they are a Coke place or a Pepsi place. If they say Pepsi, I'll order Mt. Dew.

The other exchange is more like haggling.
Server: "What do you want to drink."
Me: "Coke?"
Server: "Pepsi?"
Me: "Mt. Dew?"

As far as faucet and tap go. We get tap-water from the faucet. Spigot are for outdoor faucets.


A few years ago, the GF found a 20 question quiz about speaking "English". It listed 20 words or phrases in common use in British English, and the goal was for the American readers to figure out what they meant. Any more than 2 was considered good. I got 4 of 20. She got 7 if I recall.

The only one I remember for sure was "Lolly-pop Lady". I had no clue.

Here in Utah, we tend to have a distinct accent that I've managed to avoid for the most part. Words like Mountain and Layton, are pronounced MOW-uhn and LAY-uhn. Also, Ignorant is pronounced IG-nernt and meand "rude".

Van Rijn
2009-Jan-28, 09:17 AM
The only one I remember for sure was "Lolly-pop Lady". I had no clue.


I had no idea either. Apparently, that's what I'd refer to as a "school crossing guard" and named for the warning sign she holds.

That English quiz would be a fun test. Is it anywhere online?

SeanF
2009-Jan-28, 12:27 PM
(Oh, and while we're discussing South Dakota, our capital is pronounced "peer." It's not French!)
Well, I'm pretty sure it is. It just isn't pronounced in the French way.
I meant the city. :)


The other exchange is more like haggling.
Server: "What do you want to drink."
Me: "Coke?"
Server: "Pepsi?"
Me: "Mt. Dew?"
I've had that exact conversation, word-for-word. I've tried to cut back on the caffeine, though, so now it's Sprite/Sierra Mist/7-Up. :)

Tog
2009-Jan-28, 01:02 PM
I had no idea either. Apparently, that's what I'd refer to as a "school crossing guard" and named for the warning sign she holds.

That English quiz would be a fun test. Is it anywhere online?
I looked for a bit, but I couldn't find it. I don't even recall which magazine it might have been in. I want to say Reader's Digest, but it may have been one of her mom's home magazines, or some book of obscure stuff. They seem to have a lot of those around.

megrfl
2009-Jan-28, 02:41 PM
What American Accent Do You Have?

http://blogs.voices.com/voxdaily/2007/11/what_american_accent_do_you_have_quiz.html

I think the results for non-americans who speak english could be interesting too.

Scroll down for quiz.

I have a midland accent, which means I don't have an accent.

SeanF
2009-Jan-28, 03:04 PM
I have a midland accent, which means I don't have an accent.
No, it means you have a midland accent. "No accent" is objectively meaningless - it's just that somebody has arbitrarily designated a particular specific accent as the "default." :)

EDIT: I got "the Inland North," which seems about right. It says, "Chances are you call carbonated drinks 'pop'," which is certainly true. :)

megrfl
2009-Jan-28, 03:12 PM
No, it means you have a midland accent. "No accent" is objectively meaningless - it's just that somebody has arbitrarily designated a particular specific accent as the "default." :)

Thank you, I feel better. I thought I must sound like a robot when I talk. :shifty:

Moose
2009-Jan-28, 03:25 PM
Heh. As a Canadian maritimer, I got "The West" with the claim that most people think I don't have an accent. I'm finding that rather funny. If so, I may be the only one in these parts.

HenrikOlsen
2009-Jan-28, 03:55 PM
I came out The Midland:

What American accent do you have?
Your Result: <b>The Midland</b>77%
"You have a Midland accent" is just another way of saying "you don't have an accent." You probably are from the Midland (Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, southern Indiana, southern Illinois, and Missouri) but then for all we know you could be from Florida or Charleston or one of those big southern cities like Atlanta or Dallas. You have a good voice for TV and radio.
Philadelphia: 74%
The Inland North: 74%
The South: 72%
The Northeast: 64%
North Central: 32%
Boston: 28%
The West: 24%
I think what they meant about having no accent is that my speech lacks clear accent identifiers.

nauthiz
2009-Jan-28, 05:38 PM
I think what they meant about having no accent is that my speech lacks clear accent identifiers.

Or that it's perceived as something of a "normal" or "official" American accent. Before this thing told me that I have a Midland accent, I had always described it as a Television accent. I identify it with the eastern Midwest and the rust belt, but more than that I identify it with the mode of speech that most people on TV get normalized to.

As for me not having an accent, well, according to folks I knew when I lived in west-middle Tennessee I have a pronounced accent.

megrfl
2009-Jan-28, 05:41 PM
Yankee or Dixie Quiz

http://www.angelfire.com/ak2/intelligencerreport/yankee_dixie_quiz.html

Don't be fooled by the title; it covers the whole US.

My result: 35% Dixie. You are definitely a Yankee.

Gillianren
2009-Jan-28, 06:19 PM
The first one told me I have a Great Lakes accent, which I do not, and the second told me I'm 35% Dixie. The thing is, pronunciation can be so varied in LA that I bet it's hard to come up with a definitive LA accent. (San Fernando Valley's being different, of course!) It's all the immigrants, I'd suspect--both from other countries and other states, though both sides of my family have been in the county for generations.

Jim
2009-Jan-28, 06:29 PM
Huh.

Midland accent. (I've been told I have a "southwestern accent"... a cross between Oklahoma and Texas, but generally not too strong... unless I leave the state.)

67% Dixie.

mahesh
2009-Jan-28, 06:54 PM
Dialects / accents are lovely. I absolutely adore them...listening to the BBC World Service is such a joy!


...ALAVUS, we QOM in PEASE! TRIESTE USSEL!

OLNEY our puns are loaded!

We KEM LILONGWE!...

LARAMIE be TALLINN you, we SPIIKENISSE DIALEKH, we CANNES TCZEW!

...BAUTZENs! ..WEIR LOS (ALAMOS) KAZANS!

WEIR a FUSHUN of MILIANA OLIPHANTS, ALAVUS!....

korjik
2009-Jan-28, 07:02 PM
I've been in Texas for 23 years, but both tests still think I am from Wisconsin (or so). Just because I have quite a few family members that have a thicker accent than Sarah Palin. :)

You'd almost think my brother was born in Green Bay or something.

Swift
2009-Jan-28, 07:08 PM
What American Accent Do You Have?

http://blogs.voices.com/voxdaily/2007/11/what_american_accent_do_you_have_quiz.html



Your Result: The Inland North 89%
You may think you speak "Standard English straight out of the dictionary" but when you step away from the Great Lakes you get asked annoying questions like "Are you from Wisconsin?" or "Are you from Chicago?" Chances are you call carbonated drinks "pop."
Funny thing is, I was born and raised in New York City. If they had asked about "Toyota", I still pronounce it with a soft "r" sound at the end. But I've lived in the midwest for 20 years. It took about a decade for me to go from "soda" (pronounced "so-dar") to "pop".

mahesh
2009-Jan-28, 07:17 PM
For me it says:
NORTHEAST
Judging by how you talk you are probably from north Jersey, New York City, Connecticut or Rhode Island. Chances are, if you are from New York City (and not those other places) people would probably be able to tell if they actually heard you speak.

I suppose London is northeast of y'all!

Gillianren
2009-Jan-28, 07:36 PM
Funny thing is, I was born and raised in New York City. If they had asked about "Toyota", I still pronounce it with a soft "r" sound at the end. But I've lived in the midwest for 20 years. It took about a decade for me to go from "soda" (pronounced "so-dar") to "pop".

I have no intention of changing!

I will dispute their claim that "you(se) guys" is strictly a New York/New Jersey-ism. It's very common in LA, though it's always "you guys," not "youse guys."

Jay200MPH
2009-Jan-28, 07:50 PM
I got "the Midland." I grew up in southern Ontario so I guess that's not too far off. I think I've also picked up a bit of residual accent from my Dutch parents ("melk", etc.)
There's actually a lot of regional variation in the Great Lakes area. Ontario's southwestern "peninsula" is kind of an accent bubble - Torontonians sound different to me, as do Michiganers and upstate New Yorkers. I successfully picked out a Michiganer in the Jakarta airport a while ago just from hearing him talk on the phone. (I came up and asked.)

And for me it's always "pop."

- J

geonuc
2009-Jan-28, 07:56 PM
I will dispute their claim that "you(se) guys" is strictly a New York/New Jersey-ism. It's very common in LA, though it's always "you guys," not "youse guys."
I agree - it's more common than what they suggest.

I scored "70% Dixie, Well Under the Mason-Dixon line". Which means we have to argue about what the M-D line is again. :(

kleindoofy
2009-Jan-28, 08:13 PM
Yankee or Dixie Quiz ...
I'm 13% Dixie and that has me worried: I expected less. :(

While still in Boston I had a defined Boston accent and although it's faded away, it doesn't take much to resurrect it.

The totally phoney and horribly faked Boston accents in the movie "Mystic River" really spoiled it for me. And they were supposedly so proud about getting it right. :confused:

[edit:]

The other quiz got it right:


Your Result: Boston

You definitely have a Boston accent, even if you think you don't. Of course, that doesn't mean you are from the Boston area, you may also be from New Hampshire or Maine.

geonuc
2009-Jan-28, 09:17 PM
This came up in the geography quiz thread (OK, I brought it up).

What does the word 'moot' mean to you? As in "it's a moot point."

I contend that while everybody uses it to mean that the question is no longer meaningful or has already been decided, it actually means debatable, undecided. This makes sense to me because of the other related meaning of moot: a conclave where matters are discussed and decided. If a question is moot, it is to be discussed at moot. Perhaps further implying that there is no point arguing about it before moot.

My Oxford American Dictionary has it this way, but Arneb pointed out an online dictionary that has it both ways.

It's of no matter; I just thought it was interesting and maybe it is regional? Or maybe I'm the only one who uses the OAD? :(

Euniculus
2009-Jan-28, 09:21 PM
I agree - it's more common than what they suggest.

I scored "70% Dixie, Well Under the Mason-Dixon line". Which means we have to argue about what the M-D line is again. :(

Having heard you speak, you don't really have a definable accent. The words and phrases you use are Southern though. :lol:

SeanF
2009-Jan-28, 09:34 PM
I think what they meant about having no accent is that my speech lacks clear accent identifiers.
What's an "accent identifier"?

Euniculus
2009-Jan-28, 09:38 PM
I came out Midland as well. :confused:

Kind of surprising because I have a Southern drawl.

Trebuchet
2009-Jan-28, 09:41 PM
This came up in the geography quiz thread (OK, I brought it up).

What does the word 'moot' mean to you? As in "it's a moot point."

I contend that while everybody uses it to mean that the question is no longer meaningful or has already been decided, it actually means debatable, undecided. This makes sense to me because of the other related meaning of moot: a conclave where matters are discussed and decided. If a question is moot, it is to be discussed at moot. Perhaps further implying that there is no point arguing about it before moot.

My Oxford American Dictionary has it this way, but Arneb pointed out an online dictionary that has it both ways.

It's of no matter; I just thought it was interesting and maybe it is regional? Or maybe I'm the only one who uses the OAD? :(

I'd say it means debatable but as long as you don't pronounce it "mute" like my former boss, I won't complain about either usage!

Gillianren
2009-Jan-28, 09:42 PM
I contend that while everybody uses it to mean that the question is no longer meaningful or has already been decided, it actually means debatable, undecided. This makes sense to me because of the other related meaning of moot: a conclave where matters are discussed and decided. If a question is moot, it is to be discussed at moot. Perhaps further implying that there is no point arguing about it before moot.

I don't actually own a dictionary, honestly. My best friend and former roommate had a huge one, but she took it back to Ohio when she moved, so I can't tell you what its definition of "moot" was. However, quick research backs up my belief that "moot court" is roughly analagous to "mock trials," which I participated in back in high school. Nothing is actually decided in a moot court, so there's that. However, also per Wikipedia, the US definition of "mootness" is "a matter is moot if further legal proceedings with regard to it can have no effect, or events have placed it beyond the reach of the law." I'm feeling vindicated, here, in my use of "moot" in your first definition.

Tog
2009-Jan-28, 10:09 PM
What's an "accent identifier"?
I collect accents. Working in a hotel I get a shot at hearing quite a few from Europe and every now and then Asian or South African. If the person looks receptive, I'll try to guess. I usually get pretty close. Sometimes I miss big.

So far, I've been right about every single person I've guessed was from Birmingham, England. The reason is they all "puff" their W sounds, which I can't explain at all.

London Proper and Private school accents have longer vowel sounds. "I've been here" will sound like "I've beeeeen heeah" for people that have been educated in Private schools or other education that stresses elocution. Patrick Stewart's accent is a great example of this. It was explained to me by a guest that strongly implied that he attended the same school as Prince Charles.

I've had quite a few talks with people that come into the hotel, and many on the help desk which was based in London.

Liverpool sounds enough like Manchester that I can't tell them apart, but I havn't heard that many yet. I Understand that Yorkshire has a very distinct sound, but I don't know that I've ever heard it.

I hear three different accents from Scotland. There is the classic one, the one that sounds a bit like Irish to me, and the "growly" one. I described these three to a Scotish guest one time and he knew exactly what I meant by the "growly" one. He tols me where they all came from, but I wasn't able to make note of it before they all got jumbled up.

Spanish Spanish pronounces the S sound as TH. As in "Thoy de Barthelona" and Grathiath. I worked with a guy from Mexico that told me about an thought he was exaggerating it until I found myself translating warranty questions in Circuit City.

South African is one I doubt I will ever get right. It's sort of English, and sort of German, and sort of Souther US (which I can't really understand at all but that's how I hear it.) Basically, if I have no clue at all, I'll guess there.

I would take those to be accent identifiers.

SeanF
2009-Jan-28, 10:26 PM
I would take those to be accent identifiers.
To summarize, then, an "accent identifier" is a particular way of pronouncing certain words or sounds. Which, still, makes the idea of "not having any" meaningless. Everybody (everybody who speaks!) has a particular way of speaking, and that's all an accent is - a particular way of speaking.

Saying somebody has no accent is like saying somebody has no skin color.

megrfl
2009-Jan-28, 10:44 PM
I pronounce water - wood-er as apposed to wahTer. Several other family members do as well. I am teased about it all the time. I grew up in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, about 20 mins from Philadelphia. I have always assumed that this is a Mid-Atlantic/Northeast region pronunciation.

How do you guys pronounce it? Not it, but water. :)

Maybe I should post this in the "You're a weird-o" thread.

megr

The Supreme Canuck
2009-Jan-28, 10:47 PM
I've had that exact conversation, word-for-word. I've tried to cut back on the caffeine, though, so now it's Sprite/Sierra Mist/7-Up. :)

Another interesting difference, here. In Canada, Mountain Dew has no caffeine. It's illegal to add caffeine to soft drinks that don't already have it "naturally," as with colas.

PetersCreek
2009-Jan-28, 11:10 PM
I grew up in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, about 20 mins from Philadelphia.

Is it also common in your area for people to drop the verb, "to be" as in, "The car needs washed"? I've heard it done by many Pennsylvanians and I've even pegged a couple of people as being from the state based just on that (non)usage. I don't know if that's confined to a particular area of the state and I admit profound ignorance of Pennsylvania geography.

Tinaa
2009-Jan-28, 11:23 PM
According to the first quiz I have a midland accent. The second said I was 66% Dixie. Anyone who has heard me talk knows I have a deep southern accent. May be it was all those years north of the Red River that fooled the quizzes.

I think all y'all probably talk funny.

Doodler
2009-Jan-28, 11:25 PM
I will dispute their claim that "you(se) guys" is strictly a New York/New Jersey-ism. It's very common in LA, though it's always "you guys," not "youse guys."


Witness Protection Program officially busted...

kleindoofy
2009-Jan-28, 11:37 PM
Is it also common in your area for people to drop the verb, "to be" as in, "The car needs washed"? ...
In certain areas in England, they add a "do" to sentences:

"Do you like your curry?"
"No, I don't do."

Van Rijn
2009-Jan-28, 11:45 PM
According to the first quiz I have a midland accent. The second said I was 66% Dixie. Anyone who has heard me talk knows I have a deep southern accent. May be it was all those years north of the Red River that fooled the quizzes.


I don't think that much of the tests. The first one gave me an "inland North" accent. The basic Dixie test said 60% Dixie, the advanced 26% Dixie. But, most of my accent is from the West Coast, Midwest and a bit of Southwest.

The Supreme Canuck
2009-Jan-29, 12:22 AM
So the first test gave me this:


"North Central" is what professional linguists call the Minnesota accent. If you saw "Fargo" you probably didn't think the characters sounded very out of the ordinary. Outsiders probably mistake you for a Canadian a lot.

So, uh, yeah.

The second gave me 33% Dixie. But apparently my usage is spread out across the entire US.

megrfl
2009-Jan-29, 12:38 AM
I'm 13% Dixie and that has me worried: I expected less. :(

Nah, adds a lil spice to ya. :)

megrfl
2009-Jan-29, 01:17 AM
Is it also common in your area for people to drop the verb, "to be" as in, "The car needs washed"?

Ha. I think my husband said that to my daughter today. :)

nauthiz
2009-Jan-29, 01:55 AM
I'm a fan of the southern Illinois phrase "Do what, now?", meaning "What did you just say?"

GeorgeLeRoyTirebiter
2009-Jan-29, 04:39 AM
Is it also common in your area for people to drop the verb, "to be" as in, "The car needs washed"? I've heard it done by many Pennsylvanians and I've even pegged a couple of people as being from the state based just on that (non)usage. I don't know if that's confined to a particular area of the state and I admit profound ignorance of Pennsylvania geography.

That is definitely not limited to Pennsylvania. I've heard plenty of people here in Kansas doing it too, including my sister (before she moved to Pennsylvania, that is). When I took a college linguistics course, the professor said that she had never heard it before she came here.

Gillianren
2009-Jan-29, 06:08 AM
Spanish Spanish pronounces the S sound as TH. As in "Thoy de Barthelona" and Grathiath. I worked with a guy from Mexico that told me about an thought he was exaggerating it until I found myself translating warranty questions in Circuit City.

There are a couple of other regional accents in Spanish that I picked up when I took it in high school, though I can't remember which was from where now. My teacher was a Swede who'd lived in Spain and Argentina, and half the class was from Mexico, Colombia, Guatemala, or wherever, just trying for the easy A. My Spanish accent is a little erratic.

Tog
2009-Jan-29, 08:15 AM
To summarize, then, an "accent identifier" is a particular way of pronouncing certain words or sounds. Which, still, makes the idea of "not having any" meaningless. Everybody (everybody who speaks!) has a particular way of speaking, and that's all an accent is - a particular way of speaking.

Saying somebody has no accent is like saying somebody has no skin color.

I'd agree with that.

I take their use of "accent identifiers" to mean the differences between that person's use and the accepted dictionary pronunciation for that language. English having both American and British versions.

geonuc
2009-Jan-29, 09:37 AM
I don't actually own a dictionary, honestly. My best friend and former roommate had a huge one, but she took it back to Ohio when she moved, so I can't tell you what its definition of "moot" was. However, quick research backs up my belief that "moot court" is roughly analagous to "mock trials," which I participated in back in high school. Nothing is actually decided in a moot court, so there's that. However, also per Wikipedia, the US definition of "mootness" is "a matter is moot if further legal proceedings with regard to it can have no effect, or events have placed it beyond the reach of the law." I'm feeling vindicated, here, in my use of "moot" in your first definition.
Being a lawyer myself, I was aware of moot courts and the legal doctrine of mootness. But, as a lawyer, I know the law sometimes use terminology that conflicts with the common usage, so I paid smaller account to that. I was really wondering if it was an American thing.

One thing's for certain, as Trebuchet pointed out, it shouldn't be pronounced 'mute'. :)

geonuc
2009-Jan-29, 09:39 AM
I came out Midland as well. :confused:

Kind of surprising because I have a Southern drawl.
Sorry, dear, but you don't sound southern at all. Midland is about right. :)

Euniculus
2009-Jan-29, 12:32 PM
Sorry, dear, but you don't sound southern at all. Midland is about right. :)

Except when I say the word draw. :lol:

Tinaa
2009-Jan-29, 12:36 PM
Well if you are southern you know that drawl is a two syllable word.

geonuc
2009-Jan-29, 12:37 PM
Except when I say the word draw. :lol:
Yeah. It took a while for me to figure out what a 'drawling' was. :D

Swift
2009-Jan-29, 06:10 PM
Apparently, humans are not the only critters with dialects
National Geographic (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/01/090128-primate-language-dialects-missions.html)

The accents and dialects that add so much variety—and sometimes confusion—to everyday life are not unique to humans, and they may be more common in primates than previously thought.

Researchers have found the first evidence for regional vocal differences in a South American primate, the pygmy marmoset.

Marmoset groups in Ecuador were recorded using unique vocalizations when communicating over distances up to 64 feet (20 meters).

"The variations could be linked to habitat, with different pitches and durations being useful in different densities of forest," said lead researcher Stella de la Torre, an ecologist at the Universidad San Francisco de Quito in Ecuador.

However, de la Torre suggests, it is also possible that the differences are the result of social interactions.

Gillianren
2009-Jan-29, 06:10 PM
Being a lawyer myself, I was aware of moot courts and the legal doctrine of mootness. But, as a lawyer, I know the law sometimes use terminology that conflicts with the common usage, so I paid smaller account to that. I was really wondering if it was an American thing.

I knew you were a lawyer, which is why I did the research. I watch a lot of Law & Order, and there are occasional references to moot court, so I was confused.


One thing's for certain, as Trebuchet pointed out, it shouldn't be pronounced 'mute'. :)

Assuredly true!

sarongsong
2009-Feb-06, 01:09 AM
...when someone on the news is talking about new government legislation - they talk about the government "tabling a bill." Which means putting it before Parliament for consideration...Is this usage also found in American English, or is it completely foreign?In the U.S. Congress, it means to "kill a bill" immediately, finally, and adversely...without a direct vote on the substance of the question (http://thomas.loc.gov/home/definitions/table.html).

Van Rijn
2009-Feb-06, 01:38 AM
Yeah. It took a while for me to figure out what a 'drawling' was. :D

That reminds me of the first time I heard someone talk about putting furniture together with "dolls." It turned out they were talking about "dowels," a word that I say with two distinct syllables.

chrissy
2009-Feb-06, 10:38 PM
Well that was a strange experience:


What American accent do you have?
Your Result: The Northeast

Judging by how you talk you are probably from north Jersey, New York City, Connecticut or Rhode Island. Chances are, if you are from New York City (and not those other places) people would probably be able to tell if they actually heard you speak.


I am from the North East but of England :D pretty close in the compass direction but wrong continent.

kleindoofy
2009-Feb-06, 11:09 PM
["tabling a bill"] ... it means to "kill a bill" ...
Just imagine if Quentin Tarantino had used that term.

I don't think "Tabling Bill I" and "Tabling Bill II" would have done as well at the box office. ;)

Tobin Dax
2009-Feb-07, 12:43 AM
Well if you are southern you know that drawl is a two syllable word.
That explains it. Every time I see "withdrawl" (which is nearly every time I get a request), I want to tell the student that this means how they talk, not dropping my course.

Jens
2009-Feb-07, 02:36 AM
To summarize, then, an "accent identifier" is a particular way of pronouncing certain words or sounds. Which, still, makes the idea of "not having any" meaningless. Everybody (everybody who speaks!) has a particular way of speaking, and that's all an accent is - a particular way of speaking.

Saying somebody has no accent is like saying somebody has no skin color.

That's right, of course. But the idea of an accent identifier is simply something you can ask a question about. For example, asking, "do you pronounce 'cat' with the same vowel sound as 'hat'" is not really a useful question because, AFAIK, all native speakers of English pronounce them the same. So an accent identifier is something you can use to actually identify one. For example, I use the word "soda", which correctly identifies me as coming from the Northeast.

On the quiz I got "inland northeast" (pretty close I guess, as I was born in New Haven and lived mostly in New York).

kleindoofy
2009-Feb-07, 02:46 AM
... asking, "do you pronounce 'cat' with the same vowel sound as 'hat'" is not really a useful question because, AFAIK, all native speakers of English pronounce them the same. ...
Nope, I don't. *Very* similar, but not exactly the same.

For me, the a in "cat" is ever so slightly more nasel that in "hat," where it is slightly more open. It's not much, but there is a difference, obviously enough to be significant in locating my origin. I thinks that's how they pin-pointed me exactly in Boston. You probably have other words between which you differentiate that I don't.

Gillianren
2009-Feb-07, 03:05 AM
For example, I use the word "soda", which correctly identifies me as coming from the Northeast.

But, as mentioned, it would incorrectly identify me as coming from the Northeast.

Tensor
2009-Feb-07, 03:49 AM
The one thing that drove me crazy, when I first moved to the South from Wisconsin, was the phrase "I'll be waiting on you." In Wisconsin, we used, "I'll be waiting for you.". I wondered whether the people in the South thought I was wearing an apron or something. I got and Inland North and 13% Dixie, so I guess I haven't lost my roots yet. Even though I've been in the South now for 38 years. My one concession has been y'all.

sarongsong
2009-Feb-07, 04:04 AM
Well if you are southern you know that drawl is a two syllable word.Hee-hee, how about southern "oil" :)

Jens
2009-Feb-07, 06:18 AM
But, as mentioned, it would incorrectly identify me as coming from the Northeast.

Yeah, but I wasn't arguing anything. I was just trying to give an example of how it might work. I wasn't arguing that it always does, and in fact would never argue that.

mahesh
2009-Feb-07, 05:59 PM
Well that was a strange experience:
I am from the North East but of England :D pretty close in the compass direction but wrong continent.
my iron filings point the same direction too, chrissy! :D

like here may be that explains why i'm salivating for your pizza!

Tobin Dax
2009-Feb-07, 06:24 PM
Hee-hee, how about southern "oil" :)
I've been in Kentucky for about two years, and that one still takes a moment of thought to understand. I never thought a word could have a silent i.

Tinaa
2009-Feb-07, 06:42 PM
Of course it has a silent i. Just like boil, soil...

Jay200MPH
2009-Feb-07, 07:20 PM
Do Texans still say "erl"? Or is that one extinct?

- J

Tinaa
2009-Feb-07, 09:05 PM
Never heard a Texan say erl. My family's been here since at least the mid to late 19th century. Now, my 81 year old dad still says rinch for rinse and I do say warshin' machine.

sarongsong
2009-Feb-08, 12:37 AM
...that one still takes a moment of thought to understand. I never thought a word could have a silent i.I'll have to listen more carefully next time I hear it, but "all" is the southern pronounciation I thought I was hearing before (for "oil"). :)

ktesibios
2009-Feb-08, 02:00 AM
I pronounce water - wood-er as apposed to wahTer. Several other family members do as well. I am teased about it all the time. I grew up in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, about 20 mins from Philadelphia. I have always assumed that this is a Mid-Atlantic/Northeast region pronunciation.

How do you guys pronounce it? Not it, but water. :)

Maybe I should post this in the "You're a weird-o" thread.

megr

I pronounce it "wawder". I also say "chocolate" as "chawklit" and "closet" as "clawsit". I believe I got these from my Mom, who was from Chicago. "Chicago", btw, is correctly pronounced as "Chicawgo". People who say it "chicahgo" drive me right up the palm tree.

I was born in North Jersey, grew up in South Jersey, lived for 20 years in the Philly area (including 14 years in Upper Darby) and have lived for the last 9 years in the San Fernando Valley. I do wonder what a modern-day Henry Higgins would make of my stew of accents.

Cougar
2009-Feb-08, 02:30 AM
Beings how this thread is about dialects....

This construction of "beings how" or "beings that," coming from my originally Missourian wife, sounded weird to me, coming from my "no accent" :) newscast SoCal background.

I always said "seeing how" or "seeing as how" as in, "Seeing as how you got new shoes, I'm getting an i-pod...."

I guess both are kind of weird constructions.....

megrfl
2009-Feb-08, 03:37 AM
I pronounce it "wawder".
My husband corrected me and said I say "woodter".


I also say "chocolate" as "chawklit" and "closet" as "clawsit". I say chawklit too, but not clawsit.


I believe I got these from my Mom, who was from Chicago.

My mom graduated from Normal High School in Illinois, but she only lived in Normal for 4 years. I'm not sure how she says Chicago.


I was born in North Jersey, grew up in South Jersey, lived for 20 years in the Philly area (including 14 years in Upper Darby).

Get out of town. :) I guess you didn't attend Bonner (guys) or Prendergast (girls) in Drexel Hill?

My Grandparents lived in Wyckoff, NJ (North Jersey) for most of my childhood. Spent a lot of time there during the summers.

Falls under Mid-Atlantic/Northeast accents except for the Illinois influence.

Tobin Dax
2009-Feb-08, 03:38 AM
I'll have to listen more carefully next time I hear it, but "all" is the southern pronounciation I thought I was hearing before (for "oil"). :)
I think I heard "all" the first time. I figured out that I was hearing "oh-ll" instead of "oy-ll." (Hopefully that reads as I mean it to.)

An interesting incident was me trying to figure out the name of a friend of friends. I'm still not completely sure if the name was Kyle or Cole, but I doubt I'll ever meet the guy. Another one was with a guy named Tyler: I kept getting corrected on his name. It wasn't Taylor, it was Tyler. I was saying Tyler, well, with my NW "accent." Once I started to soften the "i" sound in his name, the problem went away. I guess this fits with "oil," too. ("Kyle" doesn't.) If you drawl "Tyler" and never get to the "eye" sound, that's the sound of the vowel down here. "Oil" is pretty much the same most the time I hear it.

Tinaa, do you have any comments on my statement above? I always have a hard time explaining/simulating this West KY/TN accent.

Sam5
2009-Feb-08, 04:01 AM
'faucet'


now there's a word we in the UK, don't use.

Funny thing, here in the US I've always heard faucet. But once the water comes out of it, it's called "tap water".

Whirlpool
2009-Feb-08, 04:43 AM
At least the American Dialects still speaks English words but differs only in pronouncing / dictions . Unlike ours , our Dialects are Entirely different from our National Language which is Tagalog.

:doh:

Van Rijn
2009-Feb-08, 05:49 AM
Never heard a Texan say erl. My family's been here since at least the mid to late 19th century. Now, my 81 year old dad still says rinch for rinse and I do say warshin' machine.

My family from Iowa also puts an "r" in "wash" but add a bit more "o" - they put things in the "worsh."

sarongsong
2009-Feb-08, 06:14 AM
...our National Language which is Tagalog.:doh: I kept misreading your Location as MN---til now! :)

Whirlpool
2009-Feb-08, 06:17 AM
:doh: I kept misreading your Location as MN---til now! :)

LOL Sarongsong!

MNL stands for MaNiLa.


:p

sarongsong
2009-Feb-08, 06:39 AM
Right, but my munti brain readily justified "MiNneapoLis" whenever it did consider the "L"... :)

Whirlpool
2009-Feb-08, 06:42 AM
Right, but my munti brain readily justified "MiNneapoLis" whenever it did consider the "L"... :)

hmmmm...:think:

you know my language ?

sarongsong
2009-Feb-08, 06:58 AM
Hee-hee...I have my ways! (http://www.seasite.niu.edu/Tagalog/Dictionary/reverse_lookup.htm) :)
...and I do like the way Manila sounds when spoken...

Whirlpool
2009-Feb-08, 07:08 AM
:doh: I almost thought we have the same Nationality.

Graybeard6
2009-Feb-08, 08:20 AM
"You have a Midland accent" is just another way of saying "you don't have an accent." You probably are from the Midland (Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, southern Indiana, southern Illinois, and Missouri) but then for all we know you could be from Florida or Charleston or one of those big southern cities like Atlanta or Dallas. You have a good voice for TV and radio.

That's pretty much on the mark. I grew up in Pennsylvania, and did spend some years in radio and TV. I've lived in Florida for 25 years, wherein you will hear every variety of English spoken daily. However, if I go to my home town, I pick up the accent instantly,and when I'm in Huntsville, AL, (my adopted home town) they never mistake me for a Yankee.

Tinaa
2009-Feb-08, 01:15 PM
I think I heard "all" the first time. I figured out that I was hearing "oh-ll" instead of "oy-ll." (Hopefully that reads as I mean it to.)

An interesting incident was me trying to figure out the name of a friend of friends. I'm still not completely sure if the name was Kyle or Cole, but I doubt I'll ever meet the guy. Another one was with a guy named Tyler: I kept getting corrected on his name. It wasn't Taylor, it was Tyler. I was saying Tyler, well, with my NW "accent." Once I started to soften the "i" sound in his name, the problem went away. I guess this fits with "oil," too. ("Kyle" doesn't.) If you drawl "Tyler" and never get to the "eye" sound, that's the sound of the vowel down here. "Oil" is pretty much the same most the time I hear it.

Tinaa, do you have any comments on my statement above? I always have a hard time explaining/simulating this West KY/TN accent.

It is probably similar (pronounced sim-u-ler) to the long a sound when we pronounce a long e. The word key almost rhymes with okay. I never noticed it until it was pointed out to me. I think it is because we put an extra long, hard accent on the first letter of a syllable or we drop the last syllable. Some people have thought that my name is Tayna instead of Tina because of my accent. Accent is, of course, pronounced ak-se-ant.

I can see why you may hear Kyle as Cole. Pile would probably sound like Paul to the uninitiated. I would say that we probably almost drop the last consonant sound unless we make it into a two syllable word.

I spoke to Phil on the phone one time and had to spell some of the words because he couldn't understand me. Pretty weird.

korjik
2009-Feb-08, 03:04 PM
It is probably similar (pronounced sim-u-ler) to the long a sound when we pronounce a long e. The word key almost rhymes with okay. I never noticed it until it was pointed out to me. I think it is because we put an extra long, hard accent on the first letter of a syllable or we drop the last syllable. Some people have thought that my name is Tayna instead of Tina because of my accent. Accent is, of course, pronounced ak-se-ant.

I can see why you may hear Kyle as Cole. Pile would probably sound like Paul to the uninitiated. I would say that we probably almost drop the last consonant sound unless we make it into a two syllable word.

I spoke to Phil on the phone one time and had to spell some of the words because he couldn't understand me. Pretty weird.

Wherebouts in Texas are you, Tinaa?

I do have another one: Louisiana.

Pronounced Loo-si-ana

Tinaa
2009-Feb-08, 03:30 PM
I was born and raised in the Panhandle just seven miles from the OK border. I then moved down near Waco and have since settled just outside San Antonio. I probably have a really weird accent combining all the sounds from these different areas. I've even found myself picking up a bit of a Mexican accent. So many of my students are bilingual and they pronounce words a bit differently. On top of my drawl I tend to speak very rapidly. Especially if I excited or am angry. My mouth can't seem to keep up with my brain.

The worst thing about having such a deep southern accent is that people automatically assume you are stupid.

Romanus
2009-Feb-08, 03:48 PM
I've lived in the SA area most of my life, yet no one has ever said that I have an accent. However, there are some features that "place" me for strangers:

--Coke is any soft drink.
--I'm always fixing to do something.
--I'm thoroughly unapologetic in using y'all.

:)

Warren Platts
2009-Feb-08, 04:43 PM
Natives from New Orleans tend to say "Nawlins".

sarongsong
2009-Feb-08, 05:16 PM
It is probably similar (pronounced sim-u-ler)...Finally---an explanation of "nuke-you-ler"! :clap:

Tinaa
2009-Feb-08, 05:21 PM
At first I didn't understand why people were making fun of his pronunciation of nuclear. It sounded fine to me!

Tobin Dax
2009-Feb-08, 05:30 PM
The word key almost rhymes with okay.
Okay over here sounds like okai (or o-k"eye"). Which completely caught me off-guard the first time I heard it with a thicker accent, and I didn't exactly want to laugh in this girl's face. I don't know why it cracks me up, but it still does. Anyhow, I don't know that I've heard key pronounced like that over hear.

ngc3314
2009-Feb-08, 06:54 PM
The worst thing about having such a deep southern accent is that people automatically assume you are stupid.

My undergraduate advisor, like me, was raised in Nashville, but for some reason his speech shows it a lot more clearly. He told me that he'd given up trying to correct the impression, but decided to turn this mental underestimation to his advantage. Must have worked - he spent a few years as head of NASA Astrophysics. This was when he shaved his beard and took to three-piece suits, so I walked right by him at a meeting and recognized him only when he said something.

(True confessions - a part of my brain still wants to connect intelligence with accent, despite abundant personal experience to the contrary. It's that brainwashing by media stereotypes, I tell y'all!).

Gillianren
2009-Feb-08, 08:10 PM
Somebody I was talking to the other day referred to "Yoh-seh-MIGHT," and it took me a minute to realize he was mispronouncing "Yosemite." (Yoh-SEH-mih-tee.) By then, the conversation had gone too far past it for me to respond.

Jeff Root
2009-Feb-08, 09:37 PM
Re: Yoh-seh-MIGHT

I was ten when I referred to a medical doctor as a fizikian, and the
adults I was talking to thought it was humorous.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis, not Manila, nor Vanilla

sarongsong
2009-Feb-08, 10:22 PM
-- Jeff, in Minneapolis, not Manila, nor Vanilla:doh:
_____________
Tuolumne Meadows is in the "high-country" of Yosemite---try that one out! :)