PDA

View Full Version : BA in Journalism



ChesleyFan
2003-Nov-22, 03:46 PM
Was sitting in journalism class the other day when talk turned to how they relay live video/audio feeds from halfway around the world via satellites. The professor had a cartoon drawing of a satellite, pointed to the solar panels, and said "now you can think of us taking a signal and bouncing it off these panels to another station on the ground (or something equally silly)."

Of course, I'm thinking to myself Uh, no, sorry buddy. That ain't how it goes. Then he corrects himself and says "technically that isn't how it really works but we're not engineers so you can think of it this way."

Ugh. No wonder most people think science is over their heads, when they're told they need a ** in engineering to understand how commsatts work.

My prof was also talking about geostationary orbits, which were discovered by "some guy." That "guy" was Arthur C. Clarke!

SciFi Chick
2003-Dec-17, 08:51 PM
My prof was also talking about geostationary orbits, which were discovered by "some guy." That "guy" was Arthur C. Clarke!

I know quite a few people that are shocked to discover Arthur C. Clarke is an actual renowned scientist, rather than just a fiction author. :roll:

ToSeek
2003-Dec-18, 05:57 AM
My prof was also talking about geostationary orbits, which were discovered by "some guy." That "guy" was Arthur C. Clarke!

I know quite a few people that are shocked to discover Arthur C. Clarke is an actual renowned scientist, rather than just a fiction author. :roll:

I think it's an exaggeration to say that Clarke is a scientist. I don't know of any formal scientific papers he has produced (Asimov, on the other hand, was a card-carrying professor of biochemistry). If anything, he's more of an engineer and actually worked on the development of radar as an RAF officer during World War II.

SciFi Chick
2003-Dec-18, 02:34 PM
I think it's an exaggeration to say that Clarke is a scientist. I don't know of any formal scientific papers he has produced (Asimov, on the other hand, was a card-carrying professor of biochemistry). If anything, he's more of an engineer and actually worked on the development of radar as an RAF officer during World War II.

Until recently, in my mind, scientists and engineers were the same. I know that's going to mortify a lot of people here, but I think it's good for all of you to witness someone in the process of transitioning from ignorance to knowledge about a particular subject.

In any case, it the type of people I was talking about would be just as impressed with him being an engineer as they were with him being a scientist. :)