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01101001
2009-Feb-04, 06:10 PM
I didn't see a topic started for the upcoming shuttle mission, so I offer this.

On the heels of last November's STS-126 Shuttle Mission (http://www.bautforum.com/space-exploration/79545-sts-126-shuttle-mission.html), comes a blast from the past: STS-119.

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-119/thum/sts119-s-001.jpg (http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-119/html/sts119-s-001.html)

NASA Shuttle Launch and Landing (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/index.html)


Mission: STS-119
Orbiter: Discovery
Primary Payload: S6 Truss Segment and U.S. Solar Arrays
Launch Date: no earlier than Feb. 19, 2009
Launch Time: TBD
Launch Pad: 39A
Mission Duration: 14 days
Landing Site: Kennedy Space Center, Florida
Inclination/Altitude: 51.6 degrees/122 nautical miles


Launch target, no earlier than:
2009, February 19, [time to be determined] PST, Thursday
2009, February 19, [time to be determined] EST, Thursday
2009, February 19, [time to be determined] UTC, Thursday

At least 14 days to launch

NASA Space Shuttle Mission Pages (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)
NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)
NASA STS-119 Mission Information (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts119/index.html)
NASA STS-119 Mission Overview (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts119/119_overview.html)
NASA News Twitter (http://twitter.com/nasa)
Wikipedia: STS-119 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-119)
NASA Launch Schedule (http://www.nasa.gov/missions/highlights/schedule.html)
NASA Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Countdown Status (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/cdt_main.pl)
NASA Shuttle Launch and Landing (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/index.html)
NASA Shuttle Launch Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/launch_blog.html) (active about 6 hours before liftoff)
NASA Shuttle Landing Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/landing_blog.html) (active about 2 hours before touchdown)
National Weather Service, Southeast Sector, Base Reflectivity (http://radar.weather.gov/Conus/southeast_loop.php)
National Weather Service, Melbourne Florida, Hourly Weather Forecast Graph (http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?w0=t&w1=td&w3=sfcwind&w4=sky&w5=pop&w7=thunder&w8=rain&AheadHour=0&Submit=Submit&FcstType=graphical&textField1=28.41130&textField2=-80.58418&site=all)
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)
Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Coverage (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/)
Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Status Center (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/status.html)
BAUT Forum topic STS-126 Space Shuttle Mission (http://www.bautforum.com/space-exploration/79545-sts-126-shuttle-mission.html) (previous mission)
NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163))

Clocky, the God of Timecards, will probably conspire to consume most of my time for some time, so my own coverage of this mission will probably be light to nonexistent. Do feel free to add your own reporting to keep the documentation and news flowing.

01101001
2009-Feb-04, 06:13 PM
NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)

Recent updates:


Shuttle Engineers Study Fuel Valve
Today, 9:04 AM
A day after postponing the launch of space shuttle Discovery until no earlier than Feb. 19, NASA and contractor engineers are evaluating concerns about possible flow control valve damage that could be experienced during liftoff.

Particle impact tests, models and thorough discussions will take place before a shuttle meeting on Feb. 10 to decide the best way to proceed. The Flight Readiness Review that began Tuesday will resume Feb. 12 to evaluate the valve situation and potentially set a launch date for Discovery’s STS-119 mission to the International Space Station.

The flow control valves channel gaseous hydrogen from the main engines to the external fuel tank during launch. The three valves were removed from Discovery, inspected and reinstalled in preparation for the upcoming flight.

Discovery’s crew of seven astronauts are to install the last large set of solar arrays on the space station. Three sets of arrays already are installed on the orbiting laboratory and are being used to convert sunlight into electricity.

Flight Readiness Review Concludes
Yesterday, 5:21 PM
During a review of space shuttle Discovery's readiness for flight, NASA managers decided Tuesday to plan a launch no earlier than Feb. 19. The new planning date is pending additional analysis and particle impact testing associated with a flow control valve in the shuttle's main engines.

Discovery's STS-119 mission to the International Space Station originally had been targeted for Feb. 12.

The valve is one of three that channels gaseous hydrogen from the engines to the external fuel tank. One of these valves in shuttle Endeavour was found to be damaged after its mission in November. As a precaution, Discovery's valves were removed, inspected and reinstalled.

The Space Shuttle Program will convene a meeting on Feb. 10 to assess the analysis. On Feb. 12, NASA managers and contractors will continue the flight readiness review, which began Tuesday, to address the flow control valve issue and to select an official launch date.

Tucson_Tim
2009-Feb-04, 06:14 PM
I was wondering when you were going to get "back on the job" here. A launch wouldn't be the same without you.

01101001
2009-Feb-04, 06:19 PM
I was wondering when you were going to get "back on the job" here. A launch wouldn't be the same without you.

Thanks. I couldn't resist at least giving it a push start.

And now it's time to Mark Forums Read (http://www.bautforum.com/forumdisplay.php?do=markread) (like, yeah, don't click it unless you want to mark forums read) -- poof -- and return to the slightly more paying job...

I'll be back.

BetaDust
2009-Feb-04, 07:29 PM
I was wondering when you were going to get "back on the job" here. A launch wouldn't be the same without you.

I Agree. Gone for a week and I already missed him. ;)

KaiYeves
2009-Feb-05, 12:09 AM
I have to re-do the whole countdown I did in my school planner now. Well, at least it will be over the vacation.

01101001
2009-Feb-07, 02:05 AM
NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)


NASA CONTINUES ASSESSMENT OF THE NEXT SHUTTLE MISSION
Today, 3:14 PM
Because of an ongoing review of the space shuttle's flow control valves, NASA managers are rescheduling meetings next week to assess the launch readiness of shuttle Discovery's STS-119 mission to the International Space Station. The Space Shuttle Program will hold a meeting Feb. 13 to review data and determine whether to move forward with a flight readiness review on Feb. 18. The official launch date will be set at the readiness review, but for planning purposes launch now is no earlier than Feb. 22. There are three valves that channel gaseous hydrogen from the shuttle's main engines to the external fuel tank. One of these valves in shuttle Endeavour was found to be damaged after its mission in November. As a precaution, Discovery's three gaseous hydrogen valves were removed, inspected and reinstalled.

Launch target, no earlier than:
2009, February 22, [time to be determined] PST, Sunday
2009, February 22, [time to be determined] EST, Sunday
2009, February 22, [time to be determined] UTC, Sunday

At least 16 days to launch.

BPCooper
2009-Feb-09, 03:46 AM
Launch target, no earlier than:
2009, February 22, [00:31] PST, Thursday
2009, February 22, [03:31] EST, Thursday
2009, February 22, [08:31] UTC, Thursday


http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/fdf/119windows.html

01101001
2009-Feb-14, 05:03 AM
NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)


NASA will hold a news conference Friday, Feb. 20, following a review of space shuttle Discovery's readiness for flight and an assessment of shuttle flow control valve testing. An official launch date for the STS-119 mission has not been set, but for planning purposes, liftoff now is targeted for no earlier than Feb. 27.

Launch target, no earlier than:
2009, February 27, [time to be determined] PST, Friday
2009, February 27, [time to be determined] EST, Friday
2009, February 27, [time to be determined] UTC, Friday

At least 13 days to launch.

BPCooper
2009-Feb-14, 05:11 AM
1:32am EST now. New chart up:

http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/fdf/119windows.html

KaiYeves
2009-Feb-14, 07:39 PM
Darn, not during my vacation after all!

01101001
2009-Feb-21, 12:10 AM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


Senior NASA managers and engineers headed to the Kennedy Space Center today for a second flight readiness review Friday to assess testing of suspect hydrogen flow control valves and to make a decision on whether or not to press ahead with launch of the shuttle Discovery Feb. 27 on a space station assembly mission.

Some managers are opposed to launch at present, sources say, arguing the valves should be redesigned to eliminate the possibility of cracks that could lead to potentially catastrophic in-flight failures. Others believe exhaustive testing shows Discovery can be safely launched as is while a redesign is implemented for downstream flights. Still others believe a redesign is not necessary, arguing if it's safe to launch Discovery as is, it's safe to launch any mission using carefully inspected valves of the current design.

The stakes are high. With the shuttle fleet facing retirement in 2010 after nine more flights, any significant delays now, for a redesign or any other reason, could result in one or more lost missions.

Much more there (including reasons for a descending node reentry, that could make it visible over the USA).

Decision expected within hours -- or maybe minutes.

NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)


At the conclusion of the meeting an announcement will be broadcast no earlier than 8 p.m. EST on NASA TV to set the mission's official launch date.

01101001
2009-Feb-21, 03:40 AM
NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)


Today's STS-119 Flight Readiness Review has concluded and NASA managers have announced a "no go" for a Feb. 27 launch.

Not enough data. May pick date next week.

KaiYeves
2009-Feb-21, 02:13 PM
Good think I didn't write Feb. 27 down. I'm learning.

01101001
2009-Feb-25, 09:57 PM
NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)


Technicians at NASA's Kennedy Space Center are removing space shuttle Discovery’s three gaseous hydrogen flow control valves today.

Managers continue to evaluate test data in an effort to gather enough information to finalize a plan setting a new target launch date for the STS-119 mission to the International Space Station.

Though the plan has not yet been completed, technicians will install flow control valves that have flown fewer times than the ones currently in Discovery's main propulsion system.

The plan is expected to be finalized today. Once senior managers are in agreement, a Flight Readiness Review meeting will be rescheduled to assess the readiness for launch and set a formal launch target date.

So... before too very long they'll have a Flight Readiness Review meeting and maybe set a launch date.

SpaceflightNow had more details yesterday, if slightly more stale: March launch of Discovery possible, but not certain (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/090224update/):


Several sources said today it was unlikely Discovery could be ready for launch before March 12, and that assumes engineers and managers can get comfortable enough with the test data to press ahead without any design changes for the valves in question.

Edit: More, a little later, NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml):


NASA's Space Shuttle Program has established a plan that could support shuttle Discovery's launch to the International Space Station, tentatively targeted for March 12. An exact target launch date will be determined as work progresses with the shuttle's three gaseous hydrogen flow control valves.
[...]
The Space Shuttle Program will hold a meeting March 4 to review new data and assess ongoing work. Managers then will determine whether to move forward with a flight readiness review March 6.

slang
2009-Mar-05, 10:17 AM
NASA officially moves up Discovery's launch date (http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/090304date/)


Shuttle managers met today to review tests and inspections of suspect hydrogen flow control valves and agreed enough progress had been made to justify another flight readiness review Friday and a March 11 target launch date for the shuttle Discovery's delayed space station assembly mission.

01101001
2009-Mar-06, 06:41 PM
NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)


Discovery Set for March 11 Launch

NASA managers completed a review today of space shuttle Discovery's readiness for flight and selected the official launch date for the STS-119 mission. Commander Lee Archambault and his six crewmates are now scheduled to lift off to the International Space Station at 9:20 p.m. EDT on March 11.

A post-readiness review news conference is scheduled for [1130 PST, 1430 EST, 1930 UTC] today at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. It will air live on NASA TV.

NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163))

Launch target:
2009, March 11, 1820 PDT, Wednesday
2009, March 11, 2120 EDT, Wednesday
2009, March 1112, 0120 UTC, Thursday

(USA Daylight time starts March 8)

5 days to launch

slang
2009-Mar-07, 01:05 AM
Launch target:
2009, March 11, 1820 PDT, Wednesday
2009, March 11, 2120 EDT, Wednesday
2009, March 12, 0120 UTC, Thursday

(USA Daylight time starts March 8)

KaiYeves
2009-Mar-07, 09:12 PM
Okay, I'm not going to write anything down until Monday...

George
2009-Mar-08, 02:14 AM
By coincidence, I will be in Orland all next week and have never witnessed a launch. Causeway tickets are sold out. I have heard Space Park in Titusville is the 2nd best place. [I found it in Google Earth.]

I wouldn't mind going to the Kennedy Space Center, but wonder what kind of problems come for a night-time event? I assume they stay open.

Assuming the Titusville Park is a great spot, what time do I need to get there? Anyone know?

01101001
2009-Mar-08, 04:48 AM
Florida Today: NASA: Shuttle's risk of debris strike up 6 percent (http://www.floridatoday.com/article/20090306/BREAKINGNEWS/90306050/1007/news02)


Engineers analyzed how much danger would be posed to the shuttle Discovery's upcoming STS-119 flight, scheduled to launch March 11, by the new debris, which was created when a U.S. and a Russian communication satellite unexpectedly rammed into each other in orbit. The Feb. 10 smash-up produced two large clouds of shrapnel that are now circling the Earth, NASA said.

The investigation found that the new space junk raises Discovery's risk factor by 6 percent, giving it a chance of about 1 in 318 of being fatally hit by debris. Mission managers had estimated a similar figure shortly after the satellite collision, but said they had reviewed the risk in detail today.

"That is very comparable to almost all of the 14-day missions we fly," said John Shannon, NASA space shuttle program manager, at a briefing today.

(Also cited in STS-125 topic.)

mugaliens
2009-Mar-08, 01:24 PM
By coincidence, I will be in Orland all next week and have never witnessed a launch. Causeway tickets are sold out. I have heard Space Park in Titusville is the 2nd best place. [I found it in Google Earth.]

I wouldn't mind going to the Kennedy Space Center, but wonder what kind of problems come for a night-time event? I assume they stay open.

After a similar discussion in another thread a while back, I called up a space enthusiast friend of mine who (deleted) if he ever infiltrated the area to watch a launch. He laughed and said, "best seat in the house - about made me deaf, though."

The only one I watched was from a boat in the water near Allenhurst, probably in Mosquito Lagoon. Could have been the larger waterway area near Titusville.

01101001
2009-Mar-09, 01:20 AM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html) (times EDT)


4:00 PM, 3/8/09, Update: Astronauts arrive; start of countdown on tap; weather 90 percent 'go' for Wednesday launch (UPDATED at 7:05 p.m. with start of countdown)
[...]
The countdown began on time at 7 p.m., setting the stage for launch of the 125th shuttle mission at 9:20 p.m. Wednesday.

Launch target:
2009, March 11, 1820 PDT, Wednesday
2009, March 11, 2120 EDT, Wednesday
2009, March 12, 0120 UTC, Thursday

3 days to launch

Jens
2009-Mar-09, 01:54 AM
The investigation found that the new space junk raises Discovery's risk factor by 6 percent, giving it a chance of about 1 in 318 of being fatally hit by debris. Mission managers had estimated a similar figure shortly after the satellite collision, but said they had reviewed the risk in detail today.

That sounds like a really high risk to me. One in 318? Does "fatally hit" mean that the shuttle would be destroyed by the debris? Or does "fatally" have a different meaning here?

01101001
2009-Mar-09, 03:13 AM
That sounds like a really high risk to me. One in 318? Does "fatally hit" mean that the shuttle would be destroyed by the debris? Or does "fatally" have a different meaning here?

I'd think it would have to be the shuttle that is fatally injured -- requiring abandonment of crew to the ISS and a rescue mission.

The shuttle's being hit while occupied, while separate from ISS, and causing death, would be much lower odds because of the smaller window of opportunity.

They always take pains to park the shuttle so the less vulnerable parts face the most risk.

Edit: Back in the olden days of 2005, there was this revision of the shuttle-destruction danger estimate USA Today: Shuttle study finds higher risk of fatal hit by debris (http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2005-06-07-shuttle-debris_x.htm):


Space debris, including bits of rock, pieces of old satellites and other trash, often ding the shuttle as it circles the Earth but usually causes no serious harm. Before Columbia, NASA estimated the spacecraft stood a 1-in-500 chance of being destroyed by space debris. That's well below the shuttle program's goal of a 1-in-200 chance.

But the preliminary analysis dated April 26 placed the odds that orbital debris could destroy the next shuttle at a range from 1 in 54 to 1 in 113. That risk estimate stems from recent tests showing that the space shuttle's heat shield is more fragile than NASA had realized.

01101001
2009-Mar-10, 01:20 PM
NASA News Twitter (http://twitter.com/nasa)


NASA is working no significant technical issues for Wednesday's 9:20 p.m. EDT launch. Weather remain's 90 percent "go."
20 minutes ago from web

(Watch those apostrophes, tweeter.)

National Weather Service, Melbourne Florida, Hourly Weather Forecast Graph (http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?w0=t&w1=td&w3=sfcwind&w4=sky&w5=pop&w7=thunder&w8=rain&AheadHour=0&Submit=Submit&FcstType=graphical&textField1=28.41130&textField2=-80.58418&site=all)

Launch target:
2009, March 11, 1820 PDT, Wednesday
2009, March 11, 2120 EDT, Wednesday
2009, March 12, 0120 UTC, Thursday

1-1/2 days to launch

BetaDust
2009-Mar-10, 04:52 PM
Launch target: <snip>
2009, March 12, 0120 UTC, Thursday


O Great.... I have Driving Lessons at 8 the next morning..:)

JustAFriend
2009-Mar-11, 01:31 AM
By coincidence, I will be in Orland all next week and have never witnessed a launch. Causeway tickets are sold out. I have heard Space Park in Titusville is the 2nd best place. [I found it in Google Earth.]

I wouldn't mind going to the Kennedy Space Center, but wonder what kind of problems come for a night-time event? I assume they stay open.

Assuming the Titusville Park is a great spot, what time do I need to get there? Anyone know?


The parks along the Intercoastal are great, but very small and parking is a problem.

A really good spot is the 520 causeway (http://www.mapquest.com/maps?city=Cape+Canaveral&state=FL) just South of the Port and cruise ship docks, about 4-5miles from the pad. Lots of parking on either side of the road and you wont be towed like from a lot of businesses along US1. You can see how good the visibility is from my video of STS-124 HERE (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTKh6y0wIIc&feature=channel_page). You can see the Shuttle on the pad from that causeway unless you're on the very east side where it would be blocked by the port buildings; from the middle of the causeway it's very clear.

But at night you can see the launches well anywhere from Daytona to Miami. I can see them great from my front door 150miles south near West Palm Beach as you can see from THIS VIDEO of STS-126 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnS5BOt1sOA).

01101001
2009-Mar-11, 02:20 AM
Launch target:
2009, March 11, 1820 PDT, Wednesday
2009, March 11, 2120 EDT, Wednesday
2009, March 12, 0120 UTC, Thursday

23 hours to launch

01101001
2009-Mar-11, 05:54 AM
Spaceflight Now appears to be intending something new for this launch, a 5-hour live webcast, using the talents of the newly available Miles O'Brien among others. See Spaceflight Now: STS-119 webcast information (http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/090305broadcast/).

It might make a nice complement to the briefer and probably drier NASA video coverage.

Edit: Supposed to begin at 1330 PDT, 1630 EDT, 2030 GMT.

01101001
2009-Mar-11, 01:20 PM
Let's see those links again.

NASA Space Shuttle Mission Pages (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)
NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)
NASA STS-119 Mission Information (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts119/index.html)
NASA STS-119 Mission Overview (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts119/119_overview.html)
NASA News Twitter (http://twitter.com/nasa)
Wikipedia: STS-119 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-119)
NASA Launch Schedule (http://www.nasa.gov/missions/highlights/schedule.html)
NASA Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Countdown Status (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/cdt_main.pl)
NASA Shuttle Launch and Landing (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/index.html)
NASA Shuttle Launch Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/launch_blog.html) (active about 6 hours before liftoff)
NASA Shuttle Landing Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/landing_blog.html) (active about 2 hours before touchdown)
National Weather Service, Southeast Sector, Base Reflectivity (http://radar.weather.gov/Conus/southeast_loop.php)
National Weather Service, Melbourne Florida, Hourly Weather Forecast Graph (http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?w0=t&w1=td&w3=sfcwind&w4=sky&w5=pop&w7=thunder&w8=rain&AheadHour=0&Submit=Submit&FcstType=graphical&textField1=28.41130&textField2=-80.58418&site=all)
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)
Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Coverage (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/)
Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Status Center (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/status.html)
BAUT Forum topic STS-126 Space Shuttle Mission (http://www.bautforum.com/space-exploration/79545-sts-126-shuttle-mission.html) (previous mission)
NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163))

NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml):


Countdown Proceeding Smoothly
Today, 6:03 AM
The countdown for space shuttle Discovery's STS-119 launch resumed as planned at 4:55 a.m. EDT, and there are no significant technical issues standing in the way of tonight's liftoff. Mission Management Team will meet at 11:55 a.m. to give a "go" or "no go" to begin fueling Discovery's external tank. The preferred launch time has been adjusted by four seconds to 9:20:14 p.m.

Launch target:
2009, March 11, 1820 PDT, Wednesday
2009, March 11, 2120 EDT, Wednesday
2009, March 12, 0120 UTC, Thursday

12 hours to launch

Swift
2009-Mar-11, 02:09 PM
Nice picture of STS-119 on the pad, with the almost full moon in the background, posted by NASA on flickr (http://www.flickr.com/photos/nasahqphoto/3346732874/).

slang
2009-Mar-11, 06:46 PM
Scrub...



NASA spokeswoman Candrea Thomas says there was a leak somewhere around a ground umbilical carrier plate between support equipment and the shuttle. The launch team is draining the liquid hydrogen tank and plan to cycle a valve as part of troubleshooting.

This delay will be at least 24 hours.

http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/status.html

ETA: Here's a launch windows chart (http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/fdf/119windows.html). There are some scheduling issues with an upcoming Soyuz launch, IIRC

interstellaryeller
2009-Mar-11, 08:33 PM
The Launch has been scrubbed, Due to a leak in a hydrogen vent line. Next launch attempt is Thursday at 8:54 p.m. EDT

KaiYeves
2009-Mar-11, 10:46 PM
Darn, I'd just written it down! Good thing I used a pencil.

01101001
2009-Mar-12, 01:08 AM
NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)


Space shuttle Discovery’s launch to the International Space Station now is targeted for no earlier than March 15. NASA managers postponed Wednesday’s planned liftoff due to a leak associated with the gaseous hydrogen venting system outside the external fuel tank. The system is used to carry excess hydrogen safely away from the launch pad.

Liftoff on March 15 would be at 7:43 p.m. EDT. The exact launch date is dependent on the work necessary to repair the problem. Managers will meet Thursday at 4 p.m. to further assess the troubleshooting plan.

Tentative launch target:
2009, March 15, 1643 PDT, Sunday
2009, March 15, 1943 EDT, Sunday
2009, March 15, 2343 UTC, Sunday

Around 4 days to launch

01101001
2009-Mar-12, 04:34 AM
This slip has impact on the number of spacewalks for the mission, even if it leaves Sunday. The more it slips, the less they walk (or they take a really big schedule hit).

CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


If the shuttle is not off the ground by March 17 at the latest, NASA will be forced to delay the 125th shuttle mission to the end of the first week in April, after a Russian mission to rotate crews on the international space station.

Even if commander Lee Archambault and his crewmates get off Sunday, they will have to give up one of their four planned spacewalks and shorten the flight by two days to make sure the docked phase of their mission is completed ahead of the Russian Soyuz TMA-14 spacecraft's planned March 26 launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

If the shuttle launch slips to Monday, the crew could be forced to give up three spacewalks, in part because a Monday launch would require a docking on the fourth day of the mission instead of flight day three as currently planned. LIkewise, a launch on Tuesday would be a one-spacewalk mission.

But the lost EVAs would have been get-ahead work. The mission will still deliver the parts and people required.

Zvezdichko
2009-Mar-12, 09:04 AM
Repeat after me. The space shuttle is a huge failure, an enormous waste of money. It's the main reason for the loss of interest in space exploration.

Scrap the shuttle now and focus on Orion!

slang
2009-Mar-12, 09:23 AM
Repeat after me. The space shuttle is a huge failure, an enormous waste of money. It's the main reason for the loss of interest in space exploration.

Scrap the shuttle now and focus on Orion!

Please don't clutter up a mission thread with these kinds of discussions, there are plenty existing threads on the topic, or you can start a new one.

01101001
2009-Mar-12, 09:15 PM
Aiming for Sunday.

CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


4:20 PM, 3/12/09, Update: NASA managers opt for expedited repair, Sunday launch try for Discovery

NASA managers today reviewed plans to fix a leaking hydrogen vent line and decided to implement an expedited repair procedure that, if all goes well, will permit a launch attempt at 7:43:44 p.m. Sunday to kick off a delayed space station assembly mission.

KaiYeves
2009-Mar-13, 01:13 AM
You know, it may be older than me, and have it's share of problems, but, especially if I watch some of the old videos, something inside of me just goes "You know, the shuttle is actually... really cool."

01101001
2009-Mar-14, 12:16 AM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


As expected, engineers troubleshooting the hydrogen vent line leak that grounded the shuttle Discovery Wednesday were unable to detect any problems using helium at ambient temperatures, officials said today. While no obvious "smoking guns" have been found, engineers are hopeful that replacing the seals and internal components in the shuttle-vent line interface will resolve the problem and clear the way for launch.

"We're going to replace these components and get into a launch attempt Sunday," said Launch Director Mike Leinbach. "If it doesn't leak, we're going to fly. If it does leak again, then we'll stand down and go look at it again."

Weather 80% Sunday; 70% Monday.

Tentative launch target:
2009, March 15, 1643 PDT, Sunday
2009, March 15, 1943 EDT, Sunday
2009, March 15, 2343 UTC, Sunday

Around 2 days to launch

01101001
2009-Mar-15, 12:43 AM
Launch target:
2009, March 15, 1643 PDT, Sunday
2009, March 15, 1943 EDT, Sunday
2009, March 15, 2343 UTC, Sunday

23 hours to launch

01101001
2009-Mar-15, 03:28 PM
NASA Space Shuttle Mission Pages (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)


The Mission Management Team met at 9:45 a.m. EDT and assessed Discovery's readiness to proceed with fueling the external tank for today's 7:43 p.m. launch. Managers gave a "go" to begin the fueling operation on time at 10:18 a.m.
[...]
Launch coverage of the STS-119 mission is scheduled to begin at [1130 PDT; 1430 EDT; 1830 UTC].

Launch target:
2009, March 15, 1643 PDT, Sunday
2009, March 15, 1943 EDT, Sunday
2009, March 15, 2343 UTC, Sunday

8 hours and 15 minutes to launch

manmeetvirdi
2009-Mar-15, 05:36 PM
Hi there
Good Day....
Well Iam watching the Live coverage of STS-119 mission. I saw a bird pretty close to space shuttle. A question came up which is as follows:

1)What does NASA does to prevent birds from sitting on shuttle??:lol:
2)What happens if birds hits shuttle once it is launched

To answer myself I would say
1) There is always so much vibration going on in complete shuttle system that birds would prefer sitting elsewhere, also tanks would make them freeze I believe !!
2) Nothing happens in case bird hits, there is no inhaling engine in case of shuttle system as in aeroplanes

Right guys........

Zvezdichko
2009-Mar-15, 05:51 PM
Please don't clutter up a mission thread with these kinds of discussions, there are plenty existing threads on the topic, or you can start a new one.

I'm sorry, but I was very angry.

stktos
2009-Mar-15, 06:15 PM
Hey guys! Just saw your thread. I just got down to Cocoa beach. (spring break) Flew down this morning. We are kinda close to NASA so I took a few pics of the shuttle.
Here is the best one. Sorry for the poor quality, its a bit hazy. And I don't have my best camera.:doh:
I will be watching the launch from the beach or the pier. Ether way I hope to be posting some pics of the launch by tonight.

01101001
2009-Mar-15, 06:33 PM
1)What does NASA does to prevent birds from sitting on shuttle??:lol:
2)What happens if birds hits shuttle once it is launched

NASA operations manager (I think) Bill Gerstenmaier was asked that by Stephen Colbert recently, in regards to the jet that was bird-struck and forced to ditch on the Hudson River in New York.

He definitely said they have fake owls on the gantry to keep the woodpeckers away (the ones that think they can excavate for bugs in the foam). That probably keeps all birds from hanging around much, but I doubt that birds just sitting (or other similar verbs) on the shuttle would hurt much. I vaguely half-recall his saying that bird strikes, perhaps a vulture, have happened at low altitude going fairly slow so they weren't a concern (for other than the struck bird, I suppose). He said they have bird radar to watch for them.

There's much to be had with a Google search of nasa shuttle bird strikes (http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en-us&q=nasa+shuttle+bird+strikes&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8). I see videos. I read about audio bird alarms. And I see headlines about bird strikes threatening the shuttle, too (space.com (http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/090115-shuttle-bird-threat.html)).

manmeetvirdi
2009-Mar-15, 06:35 PM
Dear Zvezdichko

Sorry for messing up !!
Apologies...........

Dear 69Hex ;-)
Thanks for giving the link. Have a great Shuttle launch time.
Looking forward to see your updates on Launch.

01101001
2009-Mar-15, 06:43 PM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


2:00 PM, 3/15/09, Update: Fueling complete; no leaks seen

The shuttle Discovery's external tank is fully loaded with liquid oxygen and hydrogen rocket fuel and there are no signs of any leakage from a 7-inch gaseous hydrogen vent line that triggered a launch delay Wednsday. Officials say there are no technical problems of any significance at pad 39A and the weather remains favorable for launch at 7:43:46 p.m.

Yay. Still go.

NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163)) coverage has begun.

Launch target:
2009, March 15, 1643 PDT, Sunday
2009, March 15, 1943 EDT, Sunday
2009, March 15, 2343 UTC, Sunday

5 hours to launch

manmeetvirdi
2009-Mar-15, 06:53 PM
Red team on a launch pad!!
To manually increase the Helium pressure !! Wow

Good explanation by launch director Mr Steve
He says that helium is a inert gas and does not freeze in presences of LOH hence it effectively isolates the other system to freeze in presences of LOH.

manmeetvirdi
2009-Mar-15, 07:56 PM
Astronauts on there way to Launch Pad
They are going in pretty old traditional van of Apollo Era I guess

9 vehicles including Astronauts van is going towards launch pad

5 vehicles stopped halfway

BetaDust
2009-Mar-15, 08:02 PM
They are going in pretty old traditional van of Apollo Era I guess

The Astrovan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrovan).

manmeetvirdi
2009-Mar-15, 08:13 PM
Astrovan reached !!!!!
Whoa pretty new model !! Much after Apollo !

The current model is a modified 1983 Airstream Excella motorhome, and has been in use since 1984

Asronaut wearing the parachute harness over space suit. If for orbiter develops problem, astronauts has capability to jump down !!!

Lukas
2009-Mar-15, 08:27 PM
If you want to have a look around inside the flight deck and the mid deck: http://www.panoscan.com/CubicDemos/Shuttle.html

01101001
2009-Mar-15, 08:53 PM
National Weather Service, Melbourne Florida, Hourly Weather Forecast Graph (http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?w0=t&w1=td&w3=sfcwind&w4=sky&w5=pop&w7=thunder&w8=rain&AheadHour=0&Submit=Submit&FcstType=graphical&textField1=28.41130&textField2=-80.58418&site=all)


Sunday, March 15 at 8pm
Temperature: 76 °F Dewpoint: 65 °F Surface Wind: S 11mph
Sky Cover: 40% Precipitation Potential: 10%
Thunder: <10% Rain: <10%

NASA Space Shuttle Mission Pages (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)


The STS-119 crew members have arrived at Launch Pad 39A and are preparing to board space shuttle Discovery. The white room technicians are helping the astronauts with their flight gear and securing them into their assigned seats. The hatch will be closed and latched at 5:38 p.m. EDT. The countdown is going smoothly with no technical or weather issues at this time.

2 hours 50 minutes to launch

manmeetvirdi
2009-Mar-15, 08:54 PM
Astronauts also hooks Glow sticks in there space suits, this to help them to locate each other if Orbiter loose electricity.

KaiYeves
2009-Mar-15, 08:57 PM
I saw them suit up on Spacevidcast. Very cool, never saw that before.

manmeetvirdi
2009-Mar-15, 09:00 PM
I saw them suit up on Spacevidcast. Very cool, never saw that before.
Maybe because you are far off in that planet !!

01101001
2009-Mar-15, 09:03 PM
The BA will be twittering the launch on his new breaking-news twitter feed: BANews Twitter (http://twitter.com/BANews).

Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Status Center (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/status.html) has their live video coverage, with Miles O'Brien anchoring.

01101001
2009-Mar-15, 09:18 PM
Fresh links for a fresh page:

NASA Space Shuttle Mission Pages (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)
NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)
NASA STS-119 Mission Information (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts119/index.html)
NASA STS-119 Mission Overview (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts119/119_overview.html)
NASA News Twitter (http://twitter.com/nasa)
Wikipedia: STS-119 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-119)
NASA Launch Schedule (http://www.nasa.gov/missions/highlights/schedule.html)
NASA Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Countdown Status (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/cdt_main.pl)
NASA Shuttle Launch and Landing (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/index.html)
NASA Shuttle Launch Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/launch_blog.html) (active about 6 hours before liftoff)
NASA Shuttle Landing Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/landing_blog.html) (active about 2 hours before touchdown)
National Weather Service, Southeast Sector, Base Reflectivity (http://radar.weather.gov/Conus/southeast_loop.php)
National Weather Service, Melbourne Florida, Hourly Weather Forecast Graph (http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?w0=t&w1=td&w3=sfcwind&w4=sky&w5=pop&w7=thunder&w8=rain&AheadHour=0&Submit=Submit&FcstType=graphical&textField1=28.41130&textField2=-80.58418&site=all)
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)
Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Coverage (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/)
Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Status Center (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/status.html)
BAUT Forum topic STS-126 Space Shuttle Mission (http://www.bautforum.com/space-exploration/79545-sts-126-shuttle-mission.html) (previous mission)
NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163))

Launch target:
2009, March 15, 1643 PDT, Sunday
2009, March 15, 1943 EDT, Sunday
2009, March 15, 2343 UTC, Sunday

slang
2009-Mar-15, 09:34 PM
And of course NASA tv have their own webstreams (see link in linkfarm). Have to say that the presenting lady, Candrea Thomas, has a very annoying habit of raising her voice pitch after uttering a few words in a row, or maybe on sight of a comma.

EDIT: thanks for seeing my post coming and re-posting the linkfarm. :)

01101001
2009-Mar-15, 10:03 PM
Weather 100-percent go for launch.

1 hour and 40 minutes to launch

slang
2009-Mar-15, 10:29 PM
A little over one hour left to launch-time. T-20, and holding. A planned 10 minute hold to catch up with anything that might require a bit more time. There's another such hold at T-9 minutes, that one a bit longer.

Dave J
2009-Mar-15, 10:49 PM
enjoyed having a closeout team guy on NTV talking about the procedures as they went along...very educational.

And, they double checked that the swinging door was secured. ;)

01101001
2009-Mar-15, 11:25 PM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

Coming up (times EDT):


EDT...........EVENT

07:34:44 PM...Resume countdown (T-minus 9m)
07:36:14 PM...Orbiter access arm retraction
07:38:44 PM...Launch window opens
07:38:44 PM...Hydraulic power system (APU) start
07:38:49 PM...Terminate LO2 replenish
07:39:44 PM...Purge sequence 4 hydraulic test
07:39:44 PM...IMUs to inertial
07:39:49 PM...Aerosurface profile
07:40:14 PM...Main engine steering test
07:40:49 PM...LO2 tank pressurization
07:41:09 PM...Fuel cells to internal reactants
07:41:14 PM...Clear caution-and-warning memory
07:41:44 PM...Crew closes visors
07:41:47 PM...LH2 tank pressurization
07:42:54 PM...SRB joint heater deactivation
07:43:13 PM...Shuttle GPCs take control of countdown
07:43:23 PM...SRB steering test
07:43:37 PM...Main engine start (T-6.6 seconds)
07:43:44 PM...SRB ignition (LAUNCH)

NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163))

Launch target:
2009, March 15, 1643 PDT, Sunday
2009, March 15, 1943 EDT, Sunday
2009, March 15, 2343 UTC, Sunday

18 minutes to launch

slang
2009-Mar-15, 11:36 PM
T-9 and counting

Dave J
2009-Mar-15, 11:39 PM
Godspeed...time to fly

01101001
2009-Mar-15, 11:42 PM
60 seconds

01101001
2009-Mar-15, 11:46 PM
booster separation

all good

plume in sunset spectacular (until it is on the web, it looked a lot like this other launch: Wikipedia :: Shuttle Plume at Sunset (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:ShuttlePlumeAtSunset.jpg))

slang
2009-Mar-15, 11:47 PM
SRB's gone. YAY!.

01101001
2009-Mar-15, 11:50 PM
press to MECO

slang
2009-Mar-15, 11:53 PM
MECO, and big fat tank gone

Tucson_Tim
2009-Mar-15, 11:54 PM
How much fuel is left in the shuttle after the main (external) tank is jetisoned?

cjl
2009-Mar-15, 11:56 PM
Not a whole lot - the OMS can supply around 300m/s of deltaV IIRC.

Dave J
2009-Mar-15, 11:57 PM
No tank photos this time...flying into the dark

Dave J
2009-Mar-15, 11:58 PM
How much fuel is left in the shuttle after the main tank is jetisoned?

If you're talking the external tank fuel residuals...very little.

Tucson_Tim
2009-Mar-16, 12:01 AM
Does the external tank burn up completely on re-entry? If not, where do the pieces usually hit?

Zvezdichko
2009-Mar-16, 12:05 AM
I'm happy now! I admit I was wrong to rant - after a year or so I probably won't remember the delays :)

Good luck, Discovery!

01101001
2009-Mar-16, 12:07 AM
Does the external tank burn up completely on re-entry? If not, where do the pieces usually hit?

Lockheed Martin external tank fact sheet (http://www.lockheedmartin.com/data/assets/12742.pdf) (PDF)


Almost all of the tank burns up during re-entry. Any debris
that does not burn up falls into a predetermined area of the Pacific or
Indian Ocean.

Dave J
2009-Mar-16, 12:08 AM
Does the external tank burn up completely on re-entry? If not, where do the pieces usually hit?

It's trajectory takes it into the southern Indian Ocean, in ISS inclined flights. I'm pretty sure some decent sized parts survive the suborbital reentry.

slang
2009-Mar-16, 12:10 AM
I'm happy now! I admit I was wrong to rant - after a year or so I probably won't remember the delays :)

Good luck, Discovery!

Yeah, great launch, and let's hope for a successful mission. Don't worry too much about the rant.. most of us get carried away sometimes. Just as long as it doesn't hijack the thread completely, as some emotional statements sometimes do.

Tucson_Tim
2009-Mar-16, 12:11 AM
Thanks guys.

(And who was saying that this forum isn't a resource?)

KaiYeves
2009-Mar-16, 12:21 AM
She's up and it's beautiful!

According to Google Trends, today's 53th most searched item was "NASA.gov", the 64th was "NASA TV" and the 70th was "NASA shuttle launch". Who says nobody cares about NASA?

01101001
2009-Mar-16, 12:29 AM
CBS News Space Place :: STS-119 Flightplan (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/119/119flightplan.pdf) (PDF)

Coming up (times EDT, and mission elapsed dd..hh..mm):

Circa 1-minute OMS burn now


03/15/09 Sun 08:20 PM 00 00 37 OMS-2 rocket firing
03/15/09 Sun 08:33 PM 00 00 50 Post insertion timeline begins
03/15/09 Sun 10:13 PM 00 02 30 Laptop computer setup (part 1)
03/15/09 Sun 10:13 PM 00 02 30 GIRA installation
03/15/09 Sun 10:23 PM 00 02 40 SRMS powerup
03/15/09 Sun 11:16 PM 00 03 33 NC1 rendezvous rocket firing
03/15/09 Sun 11:23 PM 00 03 40 SRMS checkout
03/15/09 Sun 11:28 PM 00 03 45 SEE setup
03/15/09 Sun 11:38 PM 00 03 55 Group B computer powerdown
03/15/09 Sun 11:53 PM 00 04 10 Wing leading edge sensors activated
03/15/09 Sun 11:53 PM 00 04 10 ET photo
03/16/09 Mon 12:03 AM 00 04 20 ET video downlink
03/16/09 Mon 12:13 AM 00 04 30 TPS imagery downlink
03/16/09 Mon 02:13 AM 00 06 30 Crew sleep begins

Dave J
2009-Mar-16, 12:49 AM
A last question on launch...
If I'm not mistaken, I understand that at MECO and ET sep, the Orbiter is still basically sub-orbital. It's not until the OMS burn that it really acheives a real orbit.

Or am I mistaken when I get exasperated at the commentators when they say they're in orbit at MECO?

megrfl
2009-Mar-16, 01:12 AM
Tonight's launch was spectacular in that it wasn't quite dark and the shuttle looked like a neon orange fire ball with a light heather gray background. In seconds it turned to bright white and then to a white dot.

About ten minutes after launch, this is all that was left.

http://img27.imageshack.us/img27/7119/013day.th.jpg (http://img27.imageshack.us/my.php?image=013day.jpg)

01101001
2009-Mar-16, 01:36 AM
It's not until the OMS burn that it really acheives a real orbit.

From something I read today, an OMS burn is sometimes used to assure the desired orbit, but I expect that by MECO they have some kind of orbit. There was an OMS burn to circularize today, but I'm not sure I heard of an ealier OMS burn. I'll see if I can find that source. Wait. Above in the schedule it is OMS-2 to circularize, so there must have been an OMS-1 earlier.

EDIT: NASA: ORBITAL MANEUVERING SYSTEM (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/technology/sts-newsref/sts-oms.html) describes OMS-1 and OMS-2.

But there isn't necessarily an OMS-1 used. CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html):


07:50:00 PM...T+06:14...Press to MECO (104.5%, 2S, 180 u/s)..........10,024
07:51:07 PM...T+07:21...Negative Moron (2@67%).......................13,638
07:52:09 PM...T+08:23...MECO commanded...............................17,592
07:52:20 PM...T+08:34...Zero thrust..................................17,605

07:56:00 PM...00...00...13...Launch replays on NASA TV
08:20:00 PM...00...00...37...OMS-2 rocket firing

No OMS-1 there.

(I must say I like that "Negative Moron" event. That rules out Moron Air Force base in Spain as a place to land.)

Wikipedia: Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering System (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbital_Maneuvering_System)


Depending on the ascent profile of the mission, the OMS engines may be used to assist acceleration to orbit.

Tucson_Tim
2009-Mar-16, 01:42 AM
. . ., so there must have been an OMS-1 earlier.

I thought I heard them say (on NASA TV) that the OMS-1 burn was not necessary since the orbit was hit precisely . . .

Dave J
2009-Mar-16, 01:44 AM
From something I read today, an OMS burn is sometimes used to assure the desired orbit, but I expect that by MECO they have some kind of orbit. There was an OMS burn to circularize today, but I'm not sure I heard of an ealier OMS burn. I'll see if I can find that source. Wait. Above in the schedule it is OMS-2 to circularize, so there must have been an OMS-1 earlier.

The OMS burn is in the schedule in case it's needed due to underperformance to get the initial MECO conditions, I think it's been used once or twice, it's a contigency thing.
The OMS2 is the circularizing orbit burn that's always done.

01101001
2009-Mar-16, 02:03 AM
On the radio news, launch director said it was the prettiest shuttle launch ever -- I expect for the colors of the plume, in sunset lighting.

===

Give me an "L"! Give me an "I"! Give me an "N"! Give me an "K"! Give me an "S"! What's that spell?

NASA Space Shuttle Mission Pages (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)
NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)
NASA STS-119 Mission Information (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts119/index.html)
NASA STS-119 Mission Overview (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts119/119_overview.html)
NASA News Twitter (http://twitter.com/nasa)
Wikipedia: STS-119 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-119)
NASA Launch Schedule (http://www.nasa.gov/missions/highlights/schedule.html)
NASA Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Countdown Status (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/cdt_main.pl)
NASA Shuttle Launch and Landing (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/index.html)
NASA Shuttle Launch Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/launch_blog.html) (active about 6 hours before liftoff)
NASA Shuttle Landing Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/landing_blog.html) (active about 2 hours before touchdown)
National Weather Service, Southeast Sector, Base Reflectivity (http://radar.weather.gov/Conus/southeast_loop.php)
National Weather Service, Melbourne Florida, Hourly Weather Forecast Graph (http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?w0=t&w1=td&w3=sfcwind&w4=sky&w5=pop&w7=thunder&w8=rain&AheadHour=0&Submit=Submit&FcstType=graphical&textField1=28.41130&textField2=-80.58418&site=all)
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)
Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Coverage (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/)
Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Status Center (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/status.html)
BAUT Forum topic STS-126 Space Shuttle Mission (http://www.bautforum.com/space-exploration/79545-sts-126-shuttle-mission.html) (previous mission)
NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163))

stktos
2009-Mar-16, 02:44 AM
I have posted pics of the shuttle launch today in this thread

http://www.bautforum.com/space-exploration/85933-sts-119-launch-pics.html#post1454372

hope you all like them.

01101001
2009-Mar-16, 06:20 AM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

Coming up (times EDT):


03/16/09
[02:13 AM: Crew sleep begins]
03:00 AM: Daily highlights
10:13 AM: Crew wakeup
02:28 PM: Heat shield checkout
05:00 PM: MMT briefing
07:00 PM: Mission status
10:18 PM: Crew downlink
03/17/09
01:43 AM: Crew sleep begins
02:00 AM: Daily highlights

schlaugh
2009-Mar-16, 04:10 PM
The OMS burn is in the schedule in case it's needed due to underperformance to get the initial MECO conditions, I think it's been used once or twice, it's a contingency thing.
The OMS2 is the circularizing orbit burn that's always done.

Not to take us off topic, but the following comes from NASA and a page on the site describing a mission profile (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/technology/sts-newsref/mission_profile.html#mission_profile)(note: it's dated to 1988 so specifics have evolved with the orbiters and the overall technology of the STS but the gist would seem to remain the same).


Normally, two thrusting maneuvers using the two orbital maneuvering system (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/technology/sts-newsref/sts-oms.html#sts-oms) engines at the aft (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/technology/sts-newsref/sts_coord.html#aft_fuselage) end of the orbiter (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/technology/sts-newsref/sts_asm.html#sts_ov) are used in a two-step thrusting sequence: to complete insertion into Earth (http://seds.lpl.arizona.edu/nineplanets/nineplanets/earth.html) orbit and to circularize the spacecraft's orbit. The orbital maneuvering system (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/technology/sts-newsref/sts-oms.html#sts-oms) engines are also used on orbit (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/technology/sts-newsref/sts_mes.html#mes_on_orbit) for any major velocity changes.

In the event of a direct-insertion mission, only one orbital maneuvering system (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/technology/sts-newsref/sts-oms.html#sts-oms) thrusting sequence is used.

01101001
2009-Mar-16, 06:41 PM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

I thought this was interesting, from the brief bios:


[The crew includes] Joseph Acaba and Richard Arnold, both former school teachers.

Arnold and Acaba were selected by NASA as part of a pre-Columbia program to add "educator astronauts" to the agency's roster of shuttle fliers. But with the shuttle program now set for retirement in 2010, the men and women selected as educator astronauts are now viewed as general assignment astronauts with operational roles and responsibilities.

But Acaba and Arnold both said they won't forget their roots.

"When you look at what teachers do every day, it's really an operational background," Acaba said before launch. "I mean, teachers have to think on their feet, they have to adjust all the time and I think that's part of what we do. We train for specific things, but you never really know exactly what's going to happen.

"I think bringing that skill as a teacher is really beneficial," he said. "When we're up on orbit, we may see things that these guys might not notice as an educator that we might want to make note of and when we come back, we'll try to share that with teachers to help them inspire students."

Yeah, I wish some of my teachers had been sent into space.

I do hope they are given a little time to offer up some learning for us all.

Oh, and this (http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/9-12/features/N_ARC_04-96AR_Students.html) makes me wonder how many doctors of computer science have gone up:


[Steve] Swanson [...] earned a bachelor's in engineering physics from the University of Colorado, Boulder, a master's in applied science in computer systems from Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, and a doctorate in computer science from Texas A&M University, College Station. He joined NASA as a systems engineer for the shuttle training aircraft in 1987 and was selected as an astronaut in 1998.

And what's with so many straight-A surnames: Archambault, Antonelli, Arnold, Acaba?

KaiYeves
2009-Mar-16, 09:39 PM
Yeah, I wish some of my teachers had been sent into space.
One-way, or round-trip?

mahesh
2009-Mar-16, 09:46 PM
I have posted pics of the shuttle launch today in this thread

http://www.bautforum.com/space-exploration/85933-sts-119-launch-pics.html#post1454372

hope you all like them.

stktos...yes. saw them. they are fantastic. fantastically inspired, too.
may be an idea to ask the mods to move them / post notice in astrophotography folder to alert of their existence. would get more exposure that way. your effort deserves it stktos.

thank you for putting them together and sharing them.

and Kai...:D you are funny......

01101001
2009-Mar-16, 10:53 PM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


6:00 PM, 3/16/09, Update: Discovery in good shape after launch; space debris no threat to station; avoidance maneuver not needed

A quick-look at ascent imagery and other data indicates the shuttle Discovery came through its launch and climb to space Sunday in very good shape with no major issues or anomalies, the chairman of NASA's Mission Management Team said late today. Space station controllers, meanwhile, decided a piece of space junk they had been tracking posed no threat and would not require an avoidance maneuver by the lab crew.

01101001
2009-Mar-17, 03:27 AM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

Coming up (times EDT):


03/17/09
01:43 AM: Crew sleep begins
02:00 AM: Daily highlights
09:43 AM: Crew wakeup
04:06 PM: Pitch maneuver
05:13 PM: ISS docking
06:58 PM: Hatch opening
07:15 PM: Mission/MMT status
09:03 PM: Docking replays
09:53 PM: Crew downlink
03/18/09
12:43 AM: Crew sleep begins

slang
2009-Mar-17, 07:19 PM
Docking in a little under two hours, by my calculations... I just saw them fly over, glorious shining ISS and a little shiny dot trailing it closely.. It was probably just my imagination, but they looked to be closing even in the 2 minutes they were visible.

01101001
2009-Mar-17, 08:29 PM
BA Blog: Shuttle diving (http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2009/03/17/shuttle-diving/) has some cool video of skydivers while STS-119 lifts off in the background. (direct link to Vimeo video (http://vimeo.com/3693962), about 4 minutes)

mahesh
2009-Mar-17, 08:47 PM
Slang....

the ISS is coming over your airspace in the next couple of minutes...
lucky you...clear skies man...follow them...

am trying to get the shuttle on my screen too...can't see it...probably a different window...

happy viewing guys...

mahesh
2009-Mar-17, 08:48 PM
aw...it's crossing Germany and into Poland shortly...

cloudy here...as usual...

01101001
2009-Mar-17, 08:56 PM
Currently about 200 feet to go.

CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html) (times EDT)


04:42 PM...01...20...59...Range: 200 feet
04:52 PM...01...20...69...Sunset
04:44 PM...01...21...01...Range: 170 feet
04:46 PM...01...21...03...Range: 150 feet
04:50 PM...01...21...07...Range: 100 feet
04:53 PM...01...21...10...Range: 75 feet
04:57 PM...01...21...14...Range: 50 feet
05:01 PM...01...21...18...Range: 30 feet; start stationkeeping
05:06 PM...01...21...23...End stationkeeping; push to dock
05:10 PM...01...21...27...Range: 10 feet
05:12 PM...01...21...29...DOCKING

Edit: Docking expected now about 24 minutes past the hour.

slang
2009-Mar-17, 09:05 PM
Slang....

the ISS is coming over your airspace in the next couple of minutes...
lucky you...clear skies man...follow them...

This pass was not visible here, AFAIK, despite clear sky. Wonder if they can still be seen as 2 separate spacecraft. Probably have to ask someone in the Atlantic. :)

01101001
2009-Mar-17, 09:14 PM
30 feet. Station keeping. About 10 minutes to docking.

01101001
2009-Mar-17, 09:19 PM
10 feet. 3 minutes.

01101001
2009-Mar-17, 09:20 PM
Capture confirmed.

01101001
2009-Mar-17, 11:10 PM
Ding dong.

They rang the bell and the Discovery crew began entering the ISS.

slang
2009-Mar-17, 11:14 PM
Hatches open, ships bell rung, "Discovery arriving"!

As a small aside, I was watching the station crew waiting for hatch opening, and I must protest Sandra Magnus having waaay to much fun swinging to and fro in zero G. Not fair! :)

01101001
2009-Mar-17, 11:17 PM
[...] I must protest Sandra Magnus having waaay to much fun swinging to and fro in zero G. Not fair! :)

I demand she return those bonus swings paid for by my tax dollars! What was she thinking?

Management team briefing now underway. Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

Sounds like the shuttle exercise bike broke. Good thing it's not the only exercise device up there. Go to the spare office-supply cabinet and break out the box of rubber bands.

slang
2009-Mar-17, 11:42 PM
Not much in the briefing that caught my attention enough to draw me away from BAUT. But... BUT!!.. It seems likely that the batstronaut (http://www.bautforum.com/off-topic-babbling/85975-shuttle-discovery-bat.html) didn't make it, since it still clung to the stack two minutes or so before launch... Hmm, bat, batter, hot gas, tempura!

Tucson_Tim
2009-Mar-18, 02:14 AM
It's trajectory takes it into the southern Indian Ocean, in ISS inclined flights. I'm pretty sure some decent sized parts survive the suborbital reentry.

The reentry of the external tank must be quite a sight if it's a night launch. (Or at least night time over the Indian Ocean.)

01101001
2009-Mar-18, 04:02 AM
Universe Today: The Discovery Bat's Fate is Confirmed (http://www.universetoday.com/2009/03/17/the-discovery-bats-fate-is-confirmed/)

Well done.


Although he made it as high as the launch tower, it is likely the bat dropped off and died in the searing 1400°C exhaust of the throttling boosters.

SpockJim
2009-Mar-18, 04:04 AM
I seen the Space shuttle docked wit hthe I.S.S. orbit right above my house tonight at 8:13PM Central.

01101001
2009-Mar-18, 04:06 AM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

Coming up (times EDT):


03/18/09
12:43 AM: Crew sleep begins
01:00 AM: Daily highlights
08:43 AM: Crew wakeup
11:18 AM: SSRMS S6 unberth
02:03 PM: S6 to SRMS
02:58 PM: PAO event
05:58 PM: S6 to SSRMS
06:30 PM: Mission/MMT status
10:38 PM: EVA campout

mahesh
2009-Mar-18, 04:31 PM
I seen the Space shuttle docked wit hthe I.S.S. orbit right above my house tonight at 8:13PM Central.

:clap:

i am jealous now...well...kinda...

good for you Jim! hey good for you!

you don't say if you and your family, children, neighbours, etc etc shared this or what?,,,,c'mon!...?

and ?...

Trantor
2009-Mar-18, 06:21 PM
I saw the launch thru my giant binoculars, from a large open field near my home in Central Florida. I've see many before this one, but I must say that this one was just awesome. Absolutely beautiful colors.

mahesh
2009-Mar-18, 08:02 PM
passing over south-east asia right now...Indoneasia and on to Australia.....dark clear skies..!!
to our fellow BAUTzens...

here be a real time link:
http://www.n2yo.com/?s=32960

nice onr Trantor!...:D

01101001
2009-Mar-18, 09:17 PM
here be a real time link:
http://www.n2yo.com/?s=32960

The Scientology Dianetics ad is stimulating my engrams.

Similar with no ads: Lizard-Tail GoogleSatTrack (http://www.lizard-tail.com/isana/tracking/).

slang
2009-Mar-18, 11:25 PM
you don't say if you and your family, children, neighbours, etc etc shared this or what?,,,,c'mon!...?

The pass in post #100 I watched with my 8 year old kid. I had looked up the ISS pass, and knew the shuttle would be sort of close to it. She had seen the station before, and once with Jules Verne leading. This one was nicer though, since the shuttle is much more bright. This evening there was a pass too. I had told her the time, and she kept looking at the clock, and almost beat me outside (she had grabbed the binocs too!).

01101001
2009-Mar-19, 12:08 AM
A little over 3 days mission elapsed.

NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)


At 7:22 p.m. EDT, Capcom Greg H. Johnson told Discovery Commander Lee Archambault that a Focused Inspection of Discovery's heat shield is not required. This will allow mission time liners to modify the mission plans, including possibly moving deploy of the S6 solar array from Flight Day 8 to Flight Day 6.

===

Link farm. Now 100-percent organic for your safety.

NASA Space Shuttle Mission Pages (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)
NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)
NASA STS-119 Mission Information (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts119/index.html)
NASA STS-119 Mission Overview (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts119/119_overview.html)
NASA News Twitter (http://twitter.com/nasa)
Wikipedia: STS-119 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-119)
NASA Launch Schedule (http://www.nasa.gov/missions/highlights/schedule.html)
NASA Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Countdown Status (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/cdt_main.pl)
NASA Shuttle Launch and Landing (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/index.html)
NASA Shuttle Launch Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/launch_blog.html) (active about 6 hours before liftoff)
NASA Shuttle Landing Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/landing_blog.html) (active about 2 hours before touchdown)
National Weather Service, Southeast Sector, Base Reflectivity (http://radar.weather.gov/Conus/southeast_loop.php)
National Weather Service, Melbourne Florida, Hourly Weather Forecast Graph (http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?w0=t&w1=td&w3=sfcwind&w4=sky&w5=pop&w7=thunder&w8=rain&AheadHour=0&Submit=Submit&FcstType=graphical&textField1=28.41130&textField2=-80.58418&site=all)
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)
Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Coverage (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/)
Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Status Center (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/status.html)
BAUT Forum topic STS-126 Space Shuttle Mission (http://www.bautforum.com/space-exploration/79545-sts-126-shuttle-mission.html) (previous mission)
NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163))

01101001
2009-Mar-19, 04:21 AM
Tomorrow: it's time for walkies!

CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

Coming up (times EDT):


03/19/09
12:13 AM: Crew sleep begins
01:00 AM: Daily highlights
07:00 AM: HD highlights
08:13 AM: Crew wakeup
01:13 PM: EVA-1 begins
02:03 PM: S6 installation
03:00 PM: S6 umbilicals
05:03 PM: S6 BGA release
05:33 PM: S6 SABB unstow
06:43 PM: S6 radiator deploy
07:43 PM: EVA-1 ends
09:28 PM: Crew downlink
11:43 PM: Crew sleep begins

Swift
2009-Mar-19, 12:41 PM
Tomorrow: it's time for walkies!

\cute mission control voice\

Do you want to go for a ..... walk? Who wants to go for a walk? Who wants to go?

Astronaut cocks head to the side

stktos
2009-Mar-19, 02:22 PM
GIFs posted!

http://www.bautforum.com/space-exploration/85933-sts-119-launch-pics.html#post1456565

enjoy!

01101001
2009-Mar-19, 05:45 PM
NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163))

EVA underway. Walkies! (Wicktionary (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies) for those unfamiliar with the usage)

01101001
2009-Mar-19, 09:14 PM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


The $300 million S6 solar array truss segment has been bolted into place on the far right end of the space station's main power truss.
[...]
Remaining work includes stowing a keel pin, removing launch locks, releasing a stowed radiator and deploying the canisters and blanket boxes that hold the folded solar arrays in place. If all goes well, the panels will be extended by remote control Friday.

01101001
2009-Mar-19, 11:21 PM
Astronauts have completed the EVA.

All major goals accomplished. All is go to deploy solar panels tomorrow.

Meanwhile NASA News Twitter (http://twitter.com/nasa) reports someone fixed the shuttle's space-bicycle. No more flabby thighs!

01101001
2009-Mar-20, 04:17 AM
Around 4 days 4 hours mission elapsed time.

CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

Coming up (times EDT):


03/20/09
12:00 AM: Daily highlights
07:00 AM: HD highlights
07:43 AM: Crew wakeup
09:58 AM: Solar array deploy
12:58 PM: PAO event
04:30 PM: Mission status
08:48 PM: Crew downlink
10:43 PM: Crew sleep begins

slang
2009-Mar-20, 03:09 PM
Solar panels being deployed now.

Swift
2009-Mar-20, 03:11 PM
So far it looks good. I understand they deploy half way, pause for about 45 minutes to let them warm up a little in the sun, then deploy it the rest of the way.

BetaDust
2009-Mar-20, 03:35 PM
I'm going to enjoy every minute of this Solar Array deployment!

I think it will be a while, before we see anything like this again...

slang
2009-Mar-20, 04:37 PM
2nd panel deployment just started. Grrr... sequential stills only, so far.

01101001
2009-Mar-20, 05:14 PM
NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163))

Just glanced in and saw some small space filled by 6 astronaut workers, probably monitoring the unfurling. Reminds me of a closet-sized TV studio control room I once worked where we were packed so tight that we were literally pushing each other's buttons.

They switched to external shot and the second panel looks about 50% deployed.

Swift
2009-Mar-20, 05:21 PM
They are now fully deployed mechanically and are doing a visual inspection and system check.

KaiYeves
2009-Mar-20, 07:21 PM
Full power for full science!

slang
2009-Mar-20, 09:24 PM
Gah... missed the first pass with all panels deployed by 3 minutes.. Maybe better luck tomorrow.

01101001
2009-Mar-21, 01:39 AM
About 5 days 2 hours mission elapsed time.

CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

Coming up (times EDT):


11:43 PM: Crew sleep begins
03/21/09
12:00 AM: Daily highlights
07:43 AM: Crew wakeup
12:43 PM: EVA-2 begins
07:13 PM: EVA-2 ends
08:00 PM: MIssion briefing
08:48 PM: Crew downlink
11:13 PM: Crew sleep begins

Tuckerfan
2009-Mar-21, 01:42 AM
Can I just say that this moment utterly screamed for a Star Trek reference, you know, someone doing an impression of Scotty saying, "I'm givin' ya all she's got, cap'n!" or something! And nobody did it! Man, those guys at NASA are so unhip, its a wonder their bums don't fall off!

01101001
2009-Mar-21, 04:03 PM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


Astronauts prepare for second spacewalk

Astronauts Joseph Acaba and Steven Swanson are preparing for a revised six-and-a-half-hour spacewalk today. The major goals of the excursion, the second of three planned for the shuttle Discovery's mission, are to prepare a set of solar array batteries for replacement in June; to deploy storage platforms on the international space station's solar power truss; to install a GPS navigation system antenna on a Japanese module; and to photograph two sets of radiator panels with an infrared camera. Insulation on one radiator panel has pulled away and engineers want to assess the health of the system.

EVA egress in 45 minutes.

Coming up (times EDT and mission elapsed dd...hh...mm):


12:03 PM...05...16...20...EVA-2: Crew lock depressurization
12:43 PM...05...17...00...EVA-2: Spacesuits to battery power
12:48 PM...05...17...05...EVA-2: Airlock egress
01:03 PM...05...17...20...EVA-2: Setup
01:43 PM...05...18...00...EVA-2: S6 battery R&R preps
02:43 PM...05...19...00...EVA-2: P3 nadir UCCAS deploy
03:58 PM...05...20...15...EVA-2/EV-2: JLP GPS antenna B install
03:58 PM...05...20...15...EVA-2/EV-1: S1/P1 radiator imaging
04:18 PM...05...20...35...Water recycling system rack closed
04:58 PM...05...21...15...EVA-2/EV-2: Z1 patch panel reconfig
05:28 PM...05...21...45...EVA-2: S3 PAS deploys
06:28 PM...05...22...45...EVA-2: Cleanup and airlock ingress
07:13 PM...05...23...30...EVA-2: Airlock repressurization
07:28 PM...05...23...45...Spacesuit servicing
08:00 PM...06...00...17...Mission status briefing

NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163))

01101001
2009-Mar-21, 11:40 PM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

EVA 2 almost over. Many goals met. They had problems deploying an UCCAS (unpressurized cargo carrier attachment system). I didn't know what it was either. They'll get it next time after the elves on Earth figure out a plan.

Indoors, the waste-water reprocessing unit that never quite worked after it was left up there last time, had a part replaced and appears to be working fine. Drinks are on me! (I think they still have to do some quality assaying before they start drinking the output.)

KaiYeves
2009-Mar-22, 12:14 AM
They're hipper than I am.

01101001
2009-Mar-22, 07:30 PM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

They had a half-day off, so things were somewhat quiet. They tried to run the UPA wet after the good dry run yesterday, and the flow wasn't flowing -- stored waste water, that is. Couldn't test the new part and have stood down waiting for ideas from the ground. I hope they purchased the service contract when they bought that thing. Seems like a lemon. Keep your fingers (and legs) crossed.

There were some nice telescope images of the ISS there and links to more.

EVA 3 tomorrow.

01101001
2009-Mar-23, 12:54 AM
Old business:


EVA 2 almost over. [...] They had problems deploying an UCCAS (unpressurized cargo carrier attachment system).

CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

The elves on Earth thought about it.


10:50 PM, 3/21/09, Update: Mission managers study options for deploying jammed cargo carrier
[...]
"One of the first things they do when they come out to prep the UCCAS for its deploy is to pull the adjustable-diameter pin out of the hinge line where it's holding it from deploying inadvertently, and move it over to the stow location," said lead spacewalk officer Glenda Laws-Brown.

"As you know, when you get to the international space station there is no up and down. And my guess is they thought they had it in the right configuration, but because up is down and down is up, it was actually 180 degrees out from where it should have been."

Spacewalk planners are evaluation options for freeing the jammed pin and an attempt may be added to the crew's third spacewalk Monday.

New business:


3:00 PM, 3/22/09, Update: Shuttle maneuver ordered to avoid space debris; urine processor work continues
[...]
Station commander MIke Fincke, meanwhile, replaced a filter assembly in the lab's finicky urine processor assembly late today and was cleared to load the processor with stored urine for a delayed processing test. FIncke spent most of the morning troubleshooting a lower-than-expected flow rate that delayed plans to start a test run before noon.

Flight controllers later told Fincke to stand down while engineers on the ground tried to figure out what the problem might be. Later, they suggested swapping out a filter and Fincke was cleared to make another attempt to load urine for the so-called "wet" test. A complete processing cycle takes about five hours to complete.

"Houston, station, on space-to-ground 2 for UPA," Fincke called. "We took it up to 65 percent and we can see it's going through the filter now with the nominal, so far, apparently, decrease rate."

Scotty would have taken her up to 110-percent.

Coming up (times EDT):


10:43 PM: Crew sleep begins
11:00 PM: Daily highlights
03/23/09
06:43 AM: Crew wakeup
07:00 AM: HD highlights
10:00 AM: Soyuz B-roll
11:43 AM: EVA-3 begins
06:13 PM: EVA-3 ends
07:00 PM: Mission status
08:13 PM: Crew downlink
10:13 PM: Crew sleep begins
11:00 PM: Daily highlights

Swift
2009-Mar-23, 12:40 PM
...Fincke was cleared to make another attempt to load urine for the so-called "wet" test...
Station commander MIke Fincke had five cups of coffee and seven glasses of tea (in honor of his Russian colleagues) in preparation for the test. ;)

01101001
2009-Mar-23, 01:09 PM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

About that upside down pin on the UCCAS: now they think it's right side up and that maybe they just need to pull harder to get the thingy past a detent.

Other EVA activities are miscellaneous little get-ahead tasks. Descriptions and timeline there.

01101001
2009-Mar-23, 06:51 PM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

EVA 3 is well underway. No joy on deploying the UCCAS. They removed the pin, and pushed and pulled and it wouldn't move. They'll strap it down and avoid trying to deploy another one until they can figure out what not-on-earth is going on.

Other tasks are being knocked off.

NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163))

slang
2009-Mar-23, 09:15 PM
Caught my first sight of ISS with all panels unfurled, and it was a very, very special one. I've never seen it this bright. First half of the trajectory it was bright, unmistakably ISS. But then... it just flared up very intensely. We must have been in the center of the reflected light of the Sun, it was incredible.. I think I yelled. So beautiful. Iridium flare on steroids. Then it dimmed, and went behind a thin cloud layer, and just before it went into Earth shadow it flared up again. A very special sighting to me.

KaiYeves
2009-Mar-23, 09:46 PM
I want to see it tonight!

01101001
2009-Mar-23, 10:47 PM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


6:15 PM, 3/23/09, Update: Spacewalk No. 3 ends

Astronauts Richard Arnold and Joseph Acaba began repressurizing the space station's Quest airlock at 6:04 p.m., closing out a six-hour 27-minute spacewalk, the third and final excursion planned for the shuttle Discovery's crew.

01101001
2009-Mar-24, 02:14 AM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

Coming up (times EDT):

Pretty quiet day.


10:13 PM: Crew sleep begins
11:00 PM: Daily highlights
03/24/09
06:13 AM: Crew wakeup
07:00 AM: HD highlights
11:00 AM: Soyuz rollout b-roll
01:06 PM: Crew news conference
02:08 PM: Crew off duty
04:00 PM: Mission status
10:13 PM: Crew sleep begins
11:00 PM: Daily highlights

Review:


9:10 PM, 3/23/09, Update: Urine processor working normally; engineers assess cargo carrier problem for fix by station or future shuttle crew

The failure to fully deploy an external cargo carrier mechanism during the Discovery crew's final spacewalk today will have no immediate impact on space station assembly, the flight director said today. The jammed carrier, intended to support pallets carrying spare parts and other equipment for downstream use, may be repaired by the station crew or astronauts on an upcoming assembly flight.

"All in all, it was a very productive spacewalk," lead Flight Director Kwatsi Alibaruho said. "We did learn several things about what might be ailing that mechanism and we're certainly going to look toward plans for remediating that in the future.

"This, of course, was the third and final spacewalk for the mission. So tomorrow will be largely an off-duty day for the crew. The day after tomorrow, on Wednesday, the crew will be preparing for the final transfers of equipment and logistics supplies as well as hatch closure and subsequently, undocking."

Undocking is targeted for 3:53 p.m. Wednesday. If all goes well, Discovery will land back at the Kennedy Space Center around 1:44 p.m. Saturday.

Yeah, no anomalies on the wet test of the urine processor. Miller time! (9:14pm Monday (CDT) - Time in Miller, Missouri)

===

What's for dinner? Hot links.

NASA Space Shuttle Mission Pages (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)
NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)
NASA STS-119 Mission Information (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts119/index.html)
NASA STS-119 Mission Overview (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts119/119_overview.html)
NASA News Twitter (http://twitter.com/nasa)
Wikipedia: STS-119 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-119)
NASA Launch Schedule (http://www.nasa.gov/missions/highlights/schedule.html)
NASA Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Countdown Status (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/cdt_main.pl)
NASA Shuttle Launch and Landing (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/index.html)
NASA Shuttle Launch Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/launch_blog.html) (active about 6 hours before liftoff)
NASA Shuttle Landing Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/landing_blog.html) (active about 2 hours before touchdown)
National Weather Service, Southeast Sector, Base Reflectivity (http://radar.weather.gov/Conus/southeast_loop.php)
National Weather Service, Melbourne Florida, Hourly Weather Forecast Graph (http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?w0=t&w1=td&w3=sfcwind&w4=sky&w5=pop&w7=thunder&w8=rain&AheadHour=0&Submit=Submit&FcstType=graphical&textField1=28.41130&textField2=-80.58418&site=all)
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)
Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Coverage (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/)
Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Status Center (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/status.html)
BAUT Forum topic STS-126 Space Shuttle Mission (http://www.bautforum.com/space-exploration/79545-sts-126-shuttle-mission.html) (previous mission)
NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163))

01101001
2009-Mar-24, 06:37 PM
NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)


Crews Speaks to U.S. President and Reporters
Today, 10:58 AM
All the crew members aboard space shuttle Discovery and the International Space Station gathered in the station's Harmony module Tuesday morning and spoke to the President of the United States, members of Congress and students. They also fielded questions from reporters during a joint crew news conference in the afternoon.

At 3 p.m. EDT NASA Television will play views of Discovery's launch from cameras mounted on the Solid Rocket Boosters.

NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163))

Gallery of STS-119 images (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/multimedia/index.html) (currently 75 in number)

KaiYeves
2009-Mar-24, 09:24 PM
When the Soyuz Expedition goes up on Thursday, we'll have thirteen people in space at once, right?

01101001
2009-Mar-24, 09:33 PM
When the Soyuz Expedition goes up on Thursday, we'll have thirteen people in space at once, right?

If you counted right, that ties a record of 13, in March 1995; Wikipedia: Spaceflight records (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaceflight_records):


STS-67, Mir, Soyuz TM-20, Soyuz TM-21

KaiYeves
2009-Mar-24, 09:44 PM
Seven on Discovery going down, three on the ISS, three more on the Soyuz coming up, right?

/Clue: The Movie/ Seven plus three plus three equals thirteen. /Clue: The Movie/

I'm watching the president's conversation in archived video right now. Those kids are so lucky- in one day they get to talk to both the president and a team of astronauts in orbit!

slang
2009-Mar-25, 12:22 AM
Seven on Discovery going down, three on the ISS, three more on the Soyuz coming up, right?

Too bad we can't send up Mike Melville (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Melville) once more and make it 14. Rutan! You listening?! :)

01101001
2009-Mar-25, 02:27 AM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

Coming up (times EDT):

Splitsville.


10:13 PM: Crew sleep begins
11:00 PM: Daily highlights
03/25/09
06:13 AM: Crew wakeup
07:00 AM: HD highlights
10:00 AM: ISS-19 briefing
12:53 PM: Farewell
03:53 PM: Undocking
06:00 PM: Mission status
07:43 PM: Crew downlink
08:04 PM: JAXA PAO event
10:13 PM: Crew sleep begins

01101001
2009-Mar-25, 06:33 PM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


01:45 PM, 3/25/09, Update: Shuttle crew bids station astros farewell

Closing out a busy assembly mission, the Discovery astronauts, accompanied by outgoing station flight engineer Sandra Magnus, said farewell to the international space station's three-man crew today and floated out of the lab complex for the last time to rig the shuttle for undocking at 3:53 p.m.

Gathered in the Harmony connecting module in front of the port leading to Discovery, station commander Mike Fincke thanked shuttle skipper Lee Archambault and his crewmates for delivering a final set of solar arrays and other critical equipment, along with Magnus' replacement, Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata.

Coming up (times EDT and mission elapsed dd...hh...mm), with more detail:


02:37 PM...09...18...54...Maneuver to undocking attitude
02:42 PM...09...18...59...Sunrise
03:06 PM...09...19...23...ISS in undockling orientation
03:10 PM...09...19...27...Noon
03:23 PM...09...19...40...U.S. Ku-band antenna parked
03:33 PM...09...19...50...PMA-2 prepped for undocking
03:34 PM...09...19...51...Russian arrays feathered
03:37 PM...09...19...54...Sunset

03:53 PM...09...20...10...UNDOCKING

03:54 PM...09...20...11...Initial separation
03:54 PM...09...20...11...ISS holds attitude
03:58 PM...09...20...15...Range: 50 feet; reselect -X jets
03:58 PM...09...20...15...PMA-2 depressurization
04:00 PM...09...20...17...Range 75 feet; low Z
04:09 PM...09...20...26...Russian arrays resume sun track
04:13 PM...09...20...30...Sunrise
04:22 PM...09...20...39...Range: 400 feet; start fly around
04:31 PM...09...20...48...Range: 600 feet
04:33 PM...09...20...50...Shuttle directly above ISS
04:41 PM...09...20...58...Noon
04:43 PM...09...21...00...U.S. arrays resume sun track
04:43 PM...09...21...00...ISS in TEA attitude
04:45 PM...09...21...02...Shuttle directly behind ISS
04:56 PM...09...21...13...Shuttle directly below ISS
05:08 PM...09...21...25...Separation burn No. 1
05:09 PM...09...21...26...Sunset
05:36 PM...09...21...53...Separation burn No. 2

05:38 PM...09...21...55...Post undocking computer reconfig
05:53 PM...09...22...10...Group B computer powerdown
05:53 PM...09...22...10...ISS management conference
06:00 PM...09...22...17...Mission status briefing
06:18 PM...09...22...35...Undocking playback ops
06:28 PM...09...22...45...ISS daily planning conference
07:43 PM...10...00...00...Crew choice downlink
08:04 PM...10...00...21...JAXA PAO event
09:00 PM...10...01...17...JAXA PAO event replay
10:13 PM...10...02...30...Crew sleep begins
11:00 PM...10...03...17...Daily highlights reel

NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163))

80 minutes to undocking

01101001
2009-Mar-25, 07:56 PM
Undocked.

KaiYeves
2009-Mar-25, 09:05 PM
Too bad we can't send up Mike Melville once more and make it 14. Rutan! You listening?!
I think it would be rather hard to take SS1 out of the Smithsonian and fuel it up on such short notice, even for somebody as smart as Burt Rutan.

slang
2009-Mar-25, 09:20 PM
I think it would be rather hard to take SS1 out of the Smithsonian and fuel it up on such short notice, even for somebody as smart as Burt Rutan.

Yeah, someone would probably notice. "I'm only taking it out to get the windows cleaned!" probably won't fly. Burt better hurry up with SS2 then :)

We're down to one visible ISS pass per day here, is it still a good time to view it in the US/Canada? If so, tonight is probably a great time to go out and catch ISS and Shuttle flying close.

KaiYeves
2009-Mar-25, 09:41 PM
I'll try for it. Does one calculate for Daylight Savings in the data Heavens Above gives?

01101001
2009-Mar-25, 09:52 PM
I'll try for it. Does one calculate for Daylight Savings in the data Heavens Above gives?

I'd expect it is in your local time zone -- if you provided it for HA. It should be displayed on the page. What does it say for your "Local time zone" above the table?

(It looks like "Central European Time (UTC + 1:00)" is the default if you don't tell it, which is what I always do.)

As I recall, you're US Eastern time and for Eastern daylight time, it should be "UTC - 4:00".

slang
2009-Mar-25, 10:51 PM
I'll try for it. Does one calculate for Daylight Savings in the data Heavens Above gives?

On the bottom of the main page of Heavens Above there's a link titled "What time is it ?" that should show the proper current time for your selected location.

KaiYeves
2009-Mar-25, 11:56 PM
Okay, eight thirty-six from the North-Northwest. That's sort of by Cassiopeia, right?

KaiYeves
2009-Mar-26, 12:48 AM
Whoops, seems that was the prediction for tomorrow night. I'm on a learning curve. Well, tomorrow it is, then.

01101001
2009-Mar-26, 04:35 AM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

Coming up (times EDT):

Getting ready to come home.


03/26/09
06:00 AM: ISS-19 B-roll feed
06:13 AM: Crew wakeup
07:00 AM: ISS-19 launch show
07:49 AM: ISS-19 launch
10:28 AM: TPS inspection
03:30 PM: Mission status
09:13 PM: Crew sleep begins
10:00 PM: Daily highlights

01101001
2009-Mar-27, 05:03 AM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html) (Flightplan (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/119/119flightplan.html))

Coming up (times EDT and mission elapsed dd hh mm):

Still getting ready to come home.


03/27/09 Fri 05:13 AM 11 09 30 Crew wakeup
03/27/09 Fri 08:28 AM 11 12 45 Cabin stow begins
03/27/09 Fri 09:43 AM 11 14 00 FCS checkout
03/27/09 Fri 10:53 AM 11 15 10 RCS hotfire
03/27/09 Fri 11:48 AM 11 16 05 Crew meal
03/27/09 Fri 12:48 PM 11 17 05 PAO event
03/27/09 Fri 01:08 PM 11 17 25 Deorbit review
03/27/09 Fri 01:38 PM 11 17 55 Cabin stow resumes
03/27/09 Fri 02:28 PM 11 18 45 Landing comm checks
03/27/09 Fri 03:43 PM 11 20 00 Ergometer stow
03/27/09 Fri 04:13 PM 11 20 30 Recumbent seat setup
03/27/09 Fri 04:58 PM 11 21 15 PILOT operations
03/27/09 Fri 05:13 PM 11 21 30 Launch/entry suit checkout
03/27/09 Fri 05:58 PM 11 22 15 Wing leading edge sensor system deactivation
03/27/09 Fri 06:18 PM 11 22 35 PGSC stow (part 1)
03/27/09 Fri 06:38 PM 11 22 55 KU antenna stow
03/27/09 Fri 09:13 PM 12 01 30 Crew sleep begins

Flight Day 14
03/28/09 Sat 05:13 AM 12 09 30 Crew wakeup
03/28/09 Sat 07:53 AM 12 12 10 IMU alignment
03/28/09 Sat 08:38 AM 12 12 55 Deorbit timeline begins
03/28/09 Sat 12:39 PM 12 16 56 Deorbit ignition (rev. 201)
03/28/09 Sat 01:42 PM 12 17 59 Landing

Anyone know: are we still getting a descending node entry? (Descending node is northwest to southeast across the US mainland. Might be good viewing.) That was the plan back in February, but maybe the launch slips have made it unnecessary.

Edit: Looks like ascending. Couldn't find the landing tracks, so went to previous mission topic (thanks to the keeper of the links) and found STS-126 landing tracks, changed the URL and here are STS-119 Landing Tracks (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts119/news/landing.html):

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 03:14 AM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

Coming up (times EDT):

Landing. The flight director is optimistic about a Saturday landing. Weather good but a bit windy.


03/28/09
05:13 AM: Crew wakeup
08:38 AM: Deorbit prep
09:14 AM: Soyuz docking
12:10 PM: Soyuz hatch open
12:33 PM: Deorbit burn
01:39 PM: Landing

NASA Shuttle Landing Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/landing_blog.html) (active about 2 hours before touchdown)
National Weather Service, Southeast Sector, Base Reflectivity (http://radar.weather.gov/Conus/southeast_loop.php)
National Weather Service, Melbourne Florida, Hourly Weather Forecast Graph (http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?w0=t&w1=td&w3=sfcwind&w4=sky&w5=pop&w7=thunder&w8=rain&AheadHour=0&Submit=Submit&FcstType=graphical&textField1=28.41130&textField2=-80.58418&site=all)

As he did for the launch, the BA will cover the landing in his new BANews Twitter (http://twitter.com/BANews).

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 11:41 AM
Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Status Center (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/status.html)


1135 GMT (7:35 a.m. EDT)
The latest weather forecast from the Spaceflight Meteorology Group is calling for scattered clouds at 4,000 feet, a broken deck of clouds at 20,000 feet, seven miles of visibility, a southerly wind from 170 degrees of 15 peaking to 23 knots, equating to an 8-knot crosswind and a 21-knot head/tailwind at the runway.
The concern today will be those low clouds becoming more wide spread and forming a ceiling.

About 5 hours to first-opportunity deorbit burn.

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 02:35 PM
Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Status Center (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/status.html)


1420 GMT (10:20 a.m. EDT)
[...]
The concern today will be the possibility of low clouds between 4,000 and 5,000 feet creating a ceiling that would block commander Lee Archambault's view of the runway during final approach. If the clouds develop this morning, NASA would have to keep Discovery in space.

About 2 hours to deorbit burn.

(Don't know if I'll be around for deorbit. Might make it back for touchdown.)

slang
2009-Mar-28, 04:49 PM
Weather concerns delay shuttle Discovery's landing (http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/status.html)


Today's first opportunity to bring shuttle Discovery back to Earth has been cancelled due to concerns about the weather at Kennedy Space Center. The shuttle will make an additional orbit around the planet while meteorologists monitor the situation in Florida. The next landing option is 3:14 p.m. EDT.

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 04:59 PM
Was that wave off after the go for fluid loading? I think I heard on the news that they were taking on water to aid the transition to gravity.

Coming up (if they are coming down):


EDT...........EVENT

02:08:44 PM...Deorbit rocket firing (dT: 3:01; dV: 231 mph)
02:11:45 PM...Deorbit burn complete

02:42:21 PM...Entry interface (range to KSC: 5,023 miles)
02:47:21 PM...1st roll command to right
02:56:36 PM...1st right-to-left roll reversal
03:03:00 PM...C-band radar acquisition
03:07:24 PM...Velocity less than mach 2.5
03:09:37 PM...Velocity less than mach 1
03:10:23 PM...Shuttle banks to line up on runway 15
03:13:59 PM...Landing

1 hour 10 minutes to deorbit burn

slang
2009-Mar-28, 05:06 PM
Was that wave off after the go for fluid loading? I think I heard on the news that they were taking on water to aid the transition to gravity.

Yes, about 50 minutes after go for fluid loading. Cross legs!

Tucson_Tim
2009-Mar-28, 05:13 PM
OK, I tried a search for "fluid loading" and didn't find anything recent or applicable. Could one of you tell me what this means? I assume it's fluid intake by the astronauts? If so, why does this help with the transition to normal gravity? Does zero G promote dehydration?

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 05:52 PM
OK, I tried a search for "fluid loading" and didn't find anything recent or applicable.

In Google book "Exercise physiology By William D. McArdle, Frank I. Katch, Victor L. Katch":


15 mL per kg of isotonic fluid prior to landing.

I'd expect to prevent postural hypotension -- lightheadedness upon standing. Ever see that one astronaut keel over during her glad-to-be-back speech?

Floriday Today on previous mission landing (http://www.floridatoday.com/content/blogs/space/2006/09/astronauts-readying-for-gravity.html):


Astronauts readying for gravity
The six astronauts aboard the shuttle Atlantis are suited up and drinking up.

The crew is doing what's called fluid loading. They're drinking water or flavored sports-style drinks. That's necessary to help the astronauts' bodies to readapt to normal gravity.

Drinking helps because fluids in their bodies have shifted toward their heads while on orbit and that reverses when gravity increases. The fluid they drink will help them from becoming disoriented, among other things.

Tucson_Tim
2009-Mar-28, 05:55 PM
. . .

Thanks. Yes, I remember her and I also seem to remember another guy having a problem.

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 05:57 PM
GO for deorbit burn.

Burn is at 8 minutes 44 seconds after the hour.

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 06:19 PM
23 minutes to atmosphere entry interface, at 42 minutes past the hour.

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 06:46 PM
In atmosphere.

28 minutes to touchdown, at 13 minutes after the hour.

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 06:49 PM
NASA Shuttle Landing Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/landing_blog.html) (active about 2 hours before touchdown)

Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Status Center (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/status.html)

NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163))

Link farm:

NASA Space Shuttle Mission Pages (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)
NASA STS-119 Mission Status Updates (http://www.nasa.gov/rss/119_update.xml)
NASA STS-119 Mission Information (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts119/index.html)
NASA STS-119 Mission Overview (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts119/119_overview.html)
NASA News Twitter (http://twitter.com/nasa)
Wikipedia: STS-119 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-119)
NASA Launch Schedule (http://www.nasa.gov/missions/highlights/schedule.html)
NASA Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Countdown Status (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/cdt_main.pl)
NASA Shuttle Launch and Landing (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/index.html)
NASA Shuttle Launch Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/launch_blog.html) (active about 6 hours before liftoff)
NASA Shuttle Landing Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/landing_blog.html) (active about 2 hours before touchdown)
National Weather Service, Southeast Sector, Base Reflectivity (http://radar.weather.gov/Conus/southeast_loop.php)
National Weather Service, Melbourne Florida, Hourly Weather Forecast Graph (http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?w0=t&w1=td&w3=sfcwind&w4=sky&w5=pop&w7=thunder&w8=rain&AheadHour=0&Submit=Submit&FcstType=graphical&textField1=28.41130&textField2=-80.58418&site=all)
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)
Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Coverage (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/)
Spaceflight Now STS-119 Mission Status Center (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts119/status.html)
BAUT Forum topic STS-126 Space Shuttle Mission (http://www.bautforum.com/space-exploration/79545-sts-126-shuttle-mission.html) (previous mission)
NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) (or NASA TV Yahoo! source (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/nasa/index.html) or high-resolution (http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1368163))

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 06:53 PM
20 minutes to touchdown

2200 miles to KSC

Discovery is 238,000 feet in altitude, traveling at 15,300 mph.

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 07:00 PM
under 15 minutes to touchdown

185 thousand feet altitude

730 miles to KSC

9800 MPH

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 07:04 PM
under 10 minutes to touchdown

145 thousand feet altitude

250 miles to KSC

4500 MPH

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 07:05 PM
The sonic booms will not surprise us.

Crossing Florida west coast, near Tampa.

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 07:07 PM
90 miles 90000 feet 7 minutes

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 07:09 PM
Now visible

68 miles 58000 feet 5 minutes

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 07:11 PM
Booms heard at commencing of 260 degree turn.

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 07:13 PM
Runway sighted.

1 minute

01101001
2009-Mar-28, 07:14 PM
Touchdown!

KaiYeves
2009-Mar-28, 08:58 PM
Welcome home, Discovery!

01101001
2009-Mar-29, 11:14 PM
The sonic booms will not surprise us.

Some may have been surprised, though.

Yahoo Reuters gallery Space Shuttle, Image 30 of 335 (http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/Arnold-Palmer-Invitational/photo//090328/ids_photos_sp/r3936990253.jpg//s:/nm/20090328/ts_nm/us_space_shuttle)


Tiger Woods of the U.S. smiles at the gallery after hearing a sonic boom from the space shuttle Discovery landing at Cape Canaveral before hitting his tee shot on the eighth hole during third round play in the Arnold Palmer Invitational PGA golf tournament at the Bay Hill Club in Orlando, Florida March 28, 2009.