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gzhpcu
2009-Feb-07, 06:13 AM
What is you favorite city? Not necessarily to live in, but to visit on a vacation?

My vote: Venice, Italy

A magical, dying city, where most of the buildings are protected by the state, so that you have hardly any modern buildings. The fascination of a city with no cars, just canals with vaporettos and bridges. Wonderful old buildings with a moorish influence, narrow alleys opening up into sunny piazzas, gondolas, cafes with nostalgic bands in piazza San Marco, leaning church towers...

Gillianren
2009-Feb-07, 06:17 AM
Venice would be awfully nice.

Personally, if I could only visit one city outside the US, I'd choose London. I'm a huge Elizabethan history buff, and so many of the pivotal sites are right there. True, not all of them are--Fotheringay, of course, though the castle isn't there anymore anyway. But quite a lot. The thought of walking where Gloriana stood is really tempting to me.

redshifter
2009-Feb-07, 06:46 AM
My fave so far: Santa Fe, NM; San Francisco, CA.

Whirlpool
2009-Feb-07, 11:22 AM
I wish to visit Houston , Texas and NASA's Johnson Space Center , that's my favorite city and the nearby places.

http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/emoticons7/105.gif

geonuc
2009-Feb-07, 11:35 AM
I assume this would be limited to those we've visited? That's a tough one for me, as I prefer the wilderness to the city.

San Francisco, with Paris a close second.

Argos
2009-Feb-07, 11:43 AM
Bariloche, Argentina, among all the cities I´ve visited in the world.

Trailing behind: Paris, London, New York.

geonuc
2009-Feb-07, 11:54 AM
Bariloche, Argentina, among all the cities I´ve visited in the world.
Tell us something about Bariloche. :)

Argos
2009-Feb-07, 12:50 PM
Strange pick, no? :) Yeah, I know.

Bariloche (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bariloche), a lovely mountain city. Great food, fine wine, charming women.

I´ve travelled the world just to find out happiness was next door [well, sort of]. ;)

megrfl
2009-Feb-07, 02:20 PM
My favorite city is Philadelphia. Four amazing seasons, great people, outstanding museums; culture everywhere you turn, steeped in history... and so much more.

Doodler
2009-Feb-07, 02:26 PM
Saint Petersburg, Florida.

Some of the islands (separated by all of about a few hundred yards from the mainland) near St. Pete used to have some really nice shoreside cottages my family would visit every year.

Gone now, but the memories are still there.

Buttercup
2009-Feb-07, 02:34 PM
Well not having traveled internationally, I'm rather limited.

Omaha, Nebraska was a nice city. I lived there in the early '90s.

closetgeek
2009-Feb-07, 02:39 PM
I haven't been to many places either. I don't know if I remember it differently then it was but I went on a trip to Philly with my 8th grade class. The museums were awesome and I have always wanted to go back. The last day of the trip we went to a harbor that had brick paved streets, a mall on one side of the water and an aquarium on the other side. I think it was Baltimore but I am not sure, either way it was a beautiful place and if I ever remember where it was, I will go back.

Jay200MPH
2009-Feb-07, 02:55 PM
Hmm, not so easy for me to pick one favourite, but I've really enjoyed these places:

Medan, Indonesia
http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v427/5/18/1244217792/n1244217792_257533_4688.jpg
After working for ten days in dismal Aceh, spending a weekend in this clean, lively city was a breath of fresh air. It's not hugely touristy but is well-travelled enough that people won't gawk at the "white" guy. It nicely lacks Jakarta's smog and constant congestion. Also, when you order a beer in Medan, it comes really cold in a frosty glass. How can you go wrong?
Runner up: Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Albuquerque, New Mexico
http://photos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2p/v353/5/18/1244217792/n1244217792_199745_6861.jpg
Hugely cool blend of cultures, stuck right in one of my favourite areas in the U.S. Lots of amazing sights to see within a few hours' drive, and the food is awesome. The fact that I was there over the 4th of July celebrations was just icing on the cake.
Runners up: Flagstaff, Arizona or just about anything along Hwy.119/I70/Hwy.141 in Colorado (Boulder, Grand Junction, Rollinsville (http://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2p/v353/5/18/1244217792/n1244217792_199719_7838.jpg), etc.)

Bancroft, Ontario
http://i185.photobucket.com/albums/x308/jay200mph/bancroft-town.jpg
Okay, this isn't even a city, just a town of 5000 plunked into beautiful cottage country. But it has tons of stuff to do, a really good Irish pub and a bustling motorsports scene (http://www.tallpinesrally.com/TallPines/) so it makes the grade. It's also close to Algonquin Park.
Runners up: Collingwood, Ontario and Ilmenau, Germany

Willemstad, Curaçao
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/19/Punda_otrabanda.jpg/800px-Punda_otrabanda.jpg
(Not my photo)
Biggest city in the Dutch Carribean. Touristy, but for a reason - it's really nice! It's also surprisingly inexpensive. My parents are constantly looking at property here.
Runner up: Québec City

- J

Buttercup
2009-Feb-07, 03:07 PM
Albuquerque might be nice to visit, but I lived close [10 miles] to it for a while and worked there: Some of the most unfriendly/hostile people I've yet encountered -- as in too many overall. And "my" 1st incidence of work-place violence [a woman slapped another in the office].

There's also a lot of racial tensions (3 ways).

You can have Albq.

KaiYeves
2009-Feb-07, 03:11 PM
Well, New York is my home and a very special place, but I think my three favorite cities that I've visited are Sydney, Australia, Washington DC, and New Haven, Connecticut.

Tinaa
2009-Feb-07, 03:43 PM
San Antonio is a pretty city. Enjoy this little slide show of some of the places to see. http://travel.yahoo.com/p-travelguide-191502017-san_antonio_vacations-i-action-pictures-tgphotoid-?fromiy=1#photos_content

The Alamo was much smaller than I had expected.

Dgennero
2009-Feb-07, 03:45 PM
To visit: Either Pompei (been there), the ancient Roman city that Vesuvius had buried or Tokyo - to sleep in one of those "tube-"hotelrooms that are hardly bigger than the inside of a CT-Scanner and to buy some totally geeky robot toys.

To live: Boston, for its high "brainiac density" - but if I were independently wealthy, I'd choose a rather lonely place, e.g. in Nevada or Arizona and build a home with an observatory there :)

Rue
2009-Feb-07, 03:50 PM
Niagara-on-the-Lake on Lake Ontario near Niagara Falls. The town maintains an 1890s look to it. Very nice but full of tourists in summer.

The other would be St. Augustine, Florida. They have cobbled streets made of the ballast stones from Spanish ships!

Frantic Freddie
2009-Feb-07, 04:40 PM
Albuquerque, New Mexico
Hugely cool blend of Mexican & American culture, stuck right in one of my favourite areas in the U.S. Lots of amazing sights to see within a few hours' drive, and the food is awesome. The fact that I was there over the 4th of July celebrations was just icing on the cake.

- J

Don't ever refer to New Mexicans as "Mexicans" or the culture as being Mexican,they consider it an insult.They call themselves Spanish,not even Hispanic or Latino,they're very proud of their Spanish heritage & many families trace their lineage back to Spain.

My own roots in the state go back to the 19th century,according to family lore my great-grandfather was friendly with Pat Garrett & may have known Billy,they were the same age,but unlike Billy,Great-Granddad died peacefully in bed at the age of 70 :D

Jay200MPH
2009-Feb-07, 04:54 PM
Don't ever refer to New Mexicans as "Mexicans" or the culture as being Mexican,they consider it an insult.They call themselves Spanish,not even Hispanic or Latino,they're very proud of their Spanish heritage & many families trace their lineage back to Spain.

My own roots in the state go back to the 19th century,according to family lore my great-grandfather was friendly with Pat Garrett & may have known Billy,they were the same age,but unlike Billy,Great-Granddad died peacefully in bed at the age of 70 :D

Thanks for the note - wasn't really thinking when I wrote that. fixed.

- J

raptorthang
2009-Feb-07, 05:06 PM
My favorite town is White Horse, Yukon. Walk along the boardwalk and have a meal ...walk a half kilometer outside the town and you become the meal. I need to be able get into the wilderness to really enjoy a place.

For a 'bigger' place it is Montreal (where I went to university) and Calgary ,where I now live.... Again just minutes from the Rockies

I lived half my first quarter century in various European countries...my favorite city in Europe is Strassbourg on the Rhine along the French/German border.

My favorite town in the USA is Moab, Utah.

Jay200MPH
2009-Feb-07, 05:13 PM
My favorite town is White Horse, Yukon. Walk along the boardwalk and have a meal ...walk a half kilometer outside the town and you become the meal. I need to be able get into the wilderness to really enjoy a place.

I was born in Whitehorse but my parents moved to Ontario when I was four. (If people ask me where I'm from I still say Whitehorse.) Plans for a trip back up there have been simmering on my back burner for years.

I agree with you on getting out though. For me what defines a cool town is what's around it as much as what's in it.

- J

Paul Beardsley
2009-Feb-07, 05:19 PM
Venice is my second-favourite city, close behind Florence, for the reasons given in the OP.

But Florence is just concentrated beauty. You cannot move for fabulous architecture and artwork. And it's much more compact than Rome, thus more manageable.

captain swoop
2009-Feb-07, 05:37 PM
I am partial to York, it's just down the road and has one of my fave Pubs and the National Railway Museum.
Canterbury is high on the list as well.

Francisco
2009-Feb-07, 05:43 PM
Saint Petersburg, Florida.

Sankt-Peterburg, Russia.

Euniculus
2009-Feb-07, 05:59 PM
Santa Barbara, California

gzhpcu
2009-Feb-07, 06:05 PM
Santa Barbara, California

That would be my second choice. Just beautiful! :)

PetersCreek
2009-Feb-07, 06:50 PM
I'm fortunate to live in my favorite city...or rather, close to it. Peters Creek, Alaska is a small, quiet community within the Municipality of Anchorage. Outside of that, it's too hard to nail down just one favorite, so I'll have to break it down.

Favorite in-state places:

1. Municipality of Anchorage

2. Homer, a quaint little drinking village with a fishing problem. Well, that's what the bumper sticker claims, anyway. It's home to a busy small boat harbor with many charter outfits, so that part is true enough. It's where I go halibut and salmon fishing with a friend who keeps his boat there. And it is a quaint place. As for the drinking part, well, don't go to Homer without paying a visit to the Salty Dawg Saloon.

I'm sorry to say that a unique part of Homer is now gone, though. Jean Keane, known as the "Eagle Lady", died in January. For years...almost since she arrived in the late 70s...she winter fed Bald Eagles with fish scraps on a daily basis. By the time she died, she had 200-300 regulars at her little place on the Homer Spit which drew quite a few tourists and professional photographers. In fact, if you've ever seen a magazine or ad photo of a wild eagle in extreme closeup detail, it may well have been one of Jean's diners.

Favorite U.S. places:

1. Seattle, Washington—I'm glad I don't live there. It's far too crowded for the wife and me. But we do enjoy visiting for the shopping, the dining, and the sights. We love the Pike Place area and our favorite winery, Chateau Ste. Michelle, is nearby in Woodinville. Seattle is also a waypoint on our trips to our second favorite place...

2. Leavenworth, Washington—Originally a small timber town in Washington's Cascade Mountains that fell on hard times, Leavenworth remade itself in the image of an alpine Bavarian village...and quite successfully at that. We haven't made it to their Christmas festival yet but we've enjoyed Oktoberfest there a couple of times, as well as "off-season" visit during our honeymoon. Leavenworth is also convenient to many of Washington's Columbia and Yakima Valley wine regions.

Outside the U.S.:

1. Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany—While living in Germany, I became enamored of the Bavarian Alps and Garmisch is so convenient to so many of it's attractions. I'm hoping to go back for my 50th birthday.

2. Stuttgart, Germany—I don't think it's one of the more idealized destinations in Germany but I spent so much time there with German friends that it's special to me. I also consider their Canstatter Volkfest one of the best kept secrets in the country. I'll take it over Munich's Oktoberfest any day.

Disinfo Agent
2009-Feb-07, 06:55 PM
Have any of you Venice lovers ever lived there during the summer?... :p

Paul Beardsley
2009-Feb-07, 07:01 PM
Have any of you Venice lovers ever lived there during the summer?... :p

I don't think any of us are under any illusion about the place. I was savaged by mosquitos there, and I gather the place stinks at certain times of year. But we're talking about magical places we've visited on holiday. We know there's a stinky side, but this thread isn't about that.

gzhpcu
2009-Feb-07, 07:08 PM
My home town, Lugano, is not too bad either....
http://img21.imageshack.us/img21/4397/salvatore2qu3.th.jpg (http://img21.imageshack.us/my.php?image=salvatore2qu3.jpg)

Disinfo Agent
2009-Feb-07, 07:11 PM
But we're talking about magical places we've visited on holiday. We know there's a stinky side, but this thread isn't about that.Venice is a good example of a "nice place to visit, but I wouldn't want to live there."

Then again, perhaps I feel that way about all cities.

gzhpcu
2009-Feb-07, 07:11 PM
Have any of you Venice lovers ever lived there during the summer?... :p
I said to visit on vacation... It is only a 4 hour's drive from where I live. I have hopped over for a weekend in summer as well, and the smell from the canals was not at all that bad... but I usually go in May or October...:)

raptorthang
2009-Feb-07, 07:39 PM
I was born in Whitehorse but my parents moved to Ontario when I was four. (If people ask me where I'm from I still say Whitehorse.) Plans for a trip back up there have been simmering on my back burner for years.

I agree with you on getting out though. For me what defines a cool town is what's around it as much as what's in it.

- J

Ya, nothing like rolling into White Horse at midnight. It's still light out and everyone from miners to natives to backpackers are crashing out along the Yukon River sipping on beer. Stretch out and nod off for a few hours and get up when you feel like it oblivious to any 24 hour clock. I just like wandering around the area with my collapsible fishing rod and gold pan. The stretch between White Horse and the Klondike has about a million places drop in a fishing line and it would take quite a few lifetimes along that stretch to to hike everywhere I'd like to.

Gillianren
2009-Feb-07, 08:27 PM
If we're limited to places we've already been, I'm another one who can hardly choose anywhere. I'd like to go back to both New York and DC--I was in each for about five days while trying to do something else--and really spend some time at the historical sites and see the museums. And I really would like to spend more time in San Francisco, now that I know more about its history.

And there's always Anaheim, of course.

Arneb
2009-Feb-07, 09:11 PM
I'll always have a suitcase in my home city, Berlin. It is the most livable big city I've ever seen, and I would prefer it to London, Paris, New York any day.

Aachen, where I now live, is a very good choice. So was the Nuremberg/Fuerth area.

Venice would be incredible, but it would have to be in one of those splendidly renovated large flats, preferably in the uppermost floor; the one in which the Brunetti family and the Soprano singers in Donna Leon's Brunetti novels lived would be fine. I'd be able to put up with a bit of stink, but I'd insist on a season with not so many tourists. Iprobably wouldn't like to work at the Ospedale Civile though. Come to think of, I wouldn't like to work in any hospital in Italy.

Gilliranren - I hope you forgive me for forming a mental image of you, but I imagine you as someone who is quite averse to constant loud noise, shouting people, squalor, filth, rudeness, violent crime, lack of personal space, total lack of green in the streets, and outrageous prices - all of which is London. So maybe you'll be better off imagining the place Elizabethan history than actually going there.

LotusExcelle
2009-Feb-07, 09:15 PM
So far my favorite city, to be honest, is the one I live in right now. Rochester, NY. I've been to my share and lived in many but this is by far my favorite.

kleindoofy
2009-Feb-07, 10:16 PM
I've lived in a few places in the US and in Europe and my favorite place was the wonderful city of Salzburg in Austria.

It's not just a tourist place, it's also a great place to live. I had the extreme pleasure of doing so for a number of years a while back.

http://www.salzburg.info/panorama4.jpg
(Image hotlinked from the Tourismus Salzburg GmbH website - I don't think they'll mind.)

Considering that I grew up in a beautiful coastal town in the South Shore area of Boston, saying that someplace else is great really means a lot. ;)

Neverfly
2009-Feb-07, 10:40 PM
Volcano, California.

Take five steps and you're outside of town again.

geonuc
2009-Feb-07, 10:54 PM
Volcano, California.

Take five steps and you're outside of town again.
Now that's my kind of town. Maybe a little crowded, but I can deal with it.

Neverfly
2009-Feb-07, 11:25 PM
Now that's my kind of town. Maybe a little crowded, but I can deal with it.

A neighbor can be handy if you have landed too much venison and don't want any to go to waste;)

Gillianren
2009-Feb-08, 08:35 PM
Gilliranren - I hope you forgive me for forming a mental image of you, but I imagine you as someone who is quite averse to constant loud noise, shouting people, squalor, filth, rudeness, violent crime, lack of personal space, total lack of green in the streets, and outrageous prices - all of which is London. So maybe you'll be better off imagining the place Elizabethan history than actually going there.

I grew up in Los Angeles County, California. It wouldn't be anything new to me. Besides, imagining it isn't the same at all. I can imagine it here. Besides, I'm not proposing to live there. I don't want to live anywhere else in the world other than Olympia. I would just like to spend a couple of weeks there.

Seeka
2009-Feb-08, 09:17 PM
I adore the UK, i am not sure i can narrow it down to one city. I love that they preserved so many buildings from medieval era. The Tower is spectacular, you can almost feel the past presence of kings and queens.

Verona is magical.

kleindoofy
2009-Feb-08, 09:23 PM
I'll always have a suitcase in my home city, Berlin. ...
[sings] "Ich hab' 'nen Koffer in Berlin ... ;)

Parrothead
2009-Feb-08, 11:29 PM
Tough decision, but I'll go with Tallinn, notably the "old town" part of the city. Some pics here (http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel/Europe/Estonia/Tallinn_County/Things_To_Do-Tallinn_County-Architecture_monuments-BR-1.html). Wish I could make it back there for the song festival, this summer.

cosmocrazy
2009-Feb-08, 11:39 PM
I adore the UK, i am not sure i can narrow it down to one city. I love that they preserved so many buildings from medieval era. The Tower is spectacular, you can almost feel the past presence of kings and queens.

Verona is magical.

You'd soon change your mind if you visited the city i lived in! :lol:

now thats not entirely true there are some nice points! I think, somewhere about i'm sure!.:doh:

:lol:

tdvance
2009-Feb-09, 04:13 AM
It's hard to say, keeps changing. It was NYC for a while. I always thought there was something about Philadelphia that I always liked too. But as I get older, I find I like best of all the quiet of my parent's house in WV with green-zone skies where you can see M31 bigger than the moon with the naked eye. Too bad the internet is dial-up though.

jokergirl
2009-Feb-09, 09:37 AM
What is you favorite city? Not necessarily to live in, but to visit on a vacation?

My vote: Venice, Italy

A magical, dying city, where most of the buildings are protected by the state, so that you have hardly any modern buildings. The fascination of a city with no cars, just canals with vaporettos and bridges. Wonderful old buildings with a moorish influence, narrow alleys opening up into sunny piazzas, gondolas, cafes with nostalgic bands in piazza San Marco, leaning church towers...

Venice is so sad to me. The times I have visited it, I saw how deeply into decay it has sunk. It does not seem alive any more people-wise either, there was no sign of anyone actually living there, just tourists and tourist places. A beautiful town that I would have loved to visit when it was still alive, but now but a shade of what it used to be. I always feel this deep sadness of doomed beauty when I see it mentioned.

Vienna, my hometown, always has a very special place in my heart. It is still very alive. As is Berlin, which is very similar to Vienna in feeling while being totally different at the same time.

As for the place I really, really want to visit soon, it's Barcelona. Wonderful town. The art! The people!

;)

PS: kleindoofy, I don't agree about Salzburg at all :D I studied there for three years and I absolutely hated it. Too small to be a big town, too crowded to be countryside... and full of tourists!

Fazor
2009-Feb-09, 05:51 PM
My favorites aren't as grandiose as most of yours, but I really liked living in downtown Pittsburgh. Also have a soft spot for Ft. Meyers, Florida, since I have relatives there and we visited often growing up. Lastly, only spent two days there, but fell in love with Booth Bay Harbor, Maine over the summer.

Oh, and last lastly, always liked our trips to Vegas...just don't know that I'd want to live there.

Swift
2009-Feb-09, 06:03 PM
Venice is my second-favourite city, close behind Florence, for the reasons given in the OP.

But Florence is just concentrated beauty. You cannot move for fabulous architecture and artwork. And it's much more compact than Rome, thus more manageable.
My wife and I visited Florence last year and it is very beautiful.

I don't know that I have a single favorite. And my criteria for favorite city to live in are very different than my favorite city to visit.

For example, I was born and raised in New York City and still love visiting it, but I would no longer want to live there.

geonuc
2009-Feb-09, 06:06 PM
Vienna, my hometown, always has a very special place in my heart. It is still very alive.
I've had the pleasure to visit Vienna. A really nice city and one I'd like to see again.

Swift
2009-Feb-09, 06:09 PM
I've had the pleasure to visit Vienna. A really nice city and one I'd like to see again.
Ditto. It would be a bad city for me to live in though - with all the coffee shops, and my love for Viennese pastry, I would weigh about 500 pounds if I lived there. :D

kleindoofy
2009-Feb-09, 07:04 PM
... PS: kleindoofy, I don't agree about Salzburg at all :D I studied there for three years and I absolutely hated it. ...
Here's a joke I heard once in Salzburg:

"Why can't you play hide & seek with someone from Vienna? Because nobody wants to go looking for him." :D

(bdbum, rimshot)

[= "Warum kannst Du mit einem Wiener nicht Verstecken spielen? Weil keiner ihn suchen will." (sounds better in Austrian dialect)]

But honestly, Vienna is great, especially the opera. I've done the standing room ritual at least 120 times.

However, I'd give something for a nice evening at the Augustiner Bräu in Salzburg right now.

I was a music student and I lived right in the middle of the old city. Maybe that made it all better for me.

dodecahedron
2009-Feb-09, 07:12 PM
Any town with fewer than 1000 residents. Preferably rural and quiet.

aurora
2009-Feb-09, 07:49 PM
Tough to choose one, and I've not seen most of the cities in the world!

But, here are some choices:

To visit, outside the US: Sydney. Lots to see and do, even compared to other cities.

To live, outside the US: Copenhagen. I think the Danes have a lot figured out.

In the US: Hilo (live) or Kailua-Kona (visit, too touristy to live), Big Island, Hawaii

Gillianren
2009-Feb-09, 07:51 PM
In the US: Hilo (live) or Kailua-Kona (visit, too touristy to live), Big Island, Hawaii

I've friends from not far from Kailua-Kona. There are areas nearby that aren't touristy at all. More kind of slums, by the sound of it.

I think a lot of people here are listing where they'd like to live, when the OP suggests where you'd like to visit. As I've said, I wouldn't live anywhere but here. That didn't stop me from suggesting that I'd like to re-visit New York and DC and visit London, Venice, or Florence.

Swift
2009-Feb-09, 08:42 PM
In the US: Hilo (live) or Kailua-Kona (visit, too touristy to live), Big Island, Hawaii
Had not thought about Hilo... been there and really liked it. Had the best French toast in my life there. Good choice.

Trantor
2009-Feb-09, 09:29 PM
My favorite city in the US is Asheville in North Carolina. It's located in a beautiful valley. It has many very nice places to visit and many excellent restaurants/hotels. The Blue Ridge Parkway(my favorite road) runs thru Asheville. It is a very cultural and artistic city and just the right size; not too big, not too small. A must see city, if you plan on visiting the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina.

My favorite big city is New York City. My favorite city here in Florida is Sarasota.

jokergirl
2009-Feb-09, 09:46 PM
[= "Warum kannst Du mit einem Wiener nicht Verstecken spielen? Weil keiner ihn suchen will." (sounds better in Austrian dialect)]

*giggles* I hadn't heard that one before! :lol:


I was a music student and I lived right in the middle of the old city. Maybe that made it all better for me.

Sounds nice. I expect there are a lot of great opportunities to get together with great musicians if you're a music student in Salzburg. :)
I was a tech student at the FH and to me it felt like students in general were under-appreciated in town - Tourists take precedence! (and the general rural vs. educated people prejudice didn't help either, of course)

;)

geonuc
2009-Feb-09, 10:53 PM
I'm saving this thread for when I plan my grand vacation! :)

Delvo
2009-Feb-10, 12:15 AM
In the US: Hilo (live) or Kailua-Kona (visit, too touristy to live), Big Island, HawaiiI did an image search using the name "Hilo" and found out that there are apparently trees right up to the water. Depending on how well the trees actually close overhead, that could make it one of the few tropical, oceanic places I could tolerate. I love shade and hate wide-open sunlight. I found this out the hard way when I lived in Florida for 20 months. Between the light and the flat landscape, it was like living in the middle of a giant, bright yellow frying pan under a low-hanging, high-wattage stove light... or a monitor/screen with the brightness set too high and the contrast set too low... or a photograph developed from an overexposed, washed-out film. That experience might have made me a bit obsessive about finding a place with dark forests and lots of clouds, fog, precipitation, and hills/mountains.:D

All of the big cities I've been in have been the same as each other. It seems to me that only little towns and rural areas can truly have distinct character.

geonuc
2009-Feb-10, 11:47 AM
All of the big cities I've been in have been the same as each other. It seems to me that only little towns and rural areas can truly have distinct character.
That's a very interesting observation. So, for example, London, Los Angeles and Lagos are essentially the same in character?

jokergirl
2009-Feb-10, 11:51 AM
Interestingly enough, it feels exactly the opposite for me :lol:

;)

gzhpcu
2009-Feb-10, 11:54 AM
I guess, it is partially a question of "beauty is in the eye of the beholder", which cities one has actually been able to visit, and what one is primarily looking for (e.g. architecture, or nature, or culture....)

Delvo
2009-Feb-10, 01:29 PM
So, for example, London, Los Angeles and Lagos are essentially the same in character?Probably, although there is some projection from the examples I've seen myself, which does not include those. It includes Kansas City, Saint Louis, Atlanta, New York City and whatever's on the New Jersey shore right across from it, Washington (DC), Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Seattle, Orlando, Memphis, Chicago, Indianapolis, whichever ones are along the highway in Ohio from there to Pittsburgh, and Frankfurt. Germany is the only other country I've been in, but the most not-completely-identical one of the bunch was actually not Frankfurt but Kansas City, because it's spread out more thinly than most of other major metroplexes. I never got the "wow, I'm really in a different place" feeling in Frankfurt, but I did several times in Germany's smaller towns, and in some places in the USA that weren't major cities either.

gzhpcu
2009-Feb-10, 02:08 PM
Well, probably any city with modern buildings will look similar. It is when you go to the center of a cities like Rome, London or Paris, that the historical buildings make the difference.

Seeka
2009-Feb-10, 05:24 PM
You'd soon change your mind if you visited the city i lived in! :lol:

now thats not entirely true there are some nice points! I think, somewhere about i'm sure!.:doh:

:lol:

I will drop in and make up my own mind during my trip:) I am sure it's lovely.

Gillianren
2009-Feb-10, 07:52 PM
I've lived near Los Angeles and Seattle, and I've visited DC and New York, and I find all four to be very different in feel. Obviously, I can speak most to Seattle and Los Angeles; while we here in Olympia call ourselves "near Seattle," there's open miles of countryside between here and there--even between Tacoma and Seattle. Los Angeles is an enormous sprawl. The Greater Los Angeles Area covers some or all of five counties, and few of those places really have any space between them. In most of LA, you just cross a street to get between one city and another. There's also a strong Spanish influcence. Los Angeles is more self-aware, self-concious than Seattle. Seattle is more laidback, for all our insane coffee addiction. (I don't actually drink coffee.) We like our trees, and most of us like our rain, and we don't feel the need to be 72 and sunny all the time.

PetersCreek
2009-Feb-10, 08:00 PM
...and we don't feel the need to be 72 and sunny all the time.

I can relate to that! I was in the Phoenix area last week for business. It was 65-75°F day and night under cloudless skies. It was nice to be sure but it didn't feel right. It threw my rhythm off. I was glad to get back to what winter is supposed to be...for me.

The weather did provide some comic moments, though. I frequented the outdoor bar of an Irish-style pub in the evenings, where I could indulge a couple of vices. The use of outdoor heaters was funny enough to this Alaskan but when a young lady showed up in a peacoat and scarf...well... :lol:

Gillianren
2009-Feb-10, 08:47 PM
It's snowing today. You don't get that back home.

geonuc
2009-Feb-10, 09:19 PM
I've lived in a few metro areas and visited many more, and I must say I disagree with the notion that big cities lack individual character, especially when you compare those of different countries.

Small towns can exhibit a cookie-cutter nature just as readily. Here in Georgia, it seems every other small town was built around a central square with the courthouse in the middle. And that characteristic is certainly not limited to this state. Western towns in the US are also sometimes hard to differentiate.

jrkeller
2009-Feb-10, 09:54 PM
Of American cities I've either lived in or visited, I'd probably pick Chicago, with Austin, TX a close second. Since 1990, Austin has lost its small size appeal.

For a small town, I'd either go with Alpine TX or Petosky MI.

I'd probably pick Rome or Nurenburg for a European city, just because I have good memories of both.

crosscountry
2009-Feb-11, 03:26 AM
2. Stuttgart, Germany—I don't think it's one of the more idealized destinations in Germany but I spent so much time there with German friends that it's special to me. I also consider their Canstatter Volkfest one of the best kept secrets in the country. I'll take it over Munich's Oktoberfest any day.


Well said. There is also a Fruhlingsfest that halfway rivals it's fall counterpart. I lived there for a year and miss it.

But, I wouldn't rank it my top 3. Austin is a great city, and I love living here. Valencia, Spain was great for many reasons. The beach in winter is nice, but so is the sea food.

Now, the last one??? I can't say. Maybe Munich, but I don't think I would want to live in Germany again. Maybe Porto, Portugal or Lisbon. Those were great places. Florence is awesome but too crowded for me. Prague is amazing, but again couldn't live there.

Probably Seville Spain. The weather is nice like Austin and there is plenty to do.

crosscountry
2009-Feb-11, 03:28 AM
Well, probably any city with modern buildings will look similar. It is when you go to the center of a cities like Rome, London or Paris, that the historical buildings make the difference.


I wouldn't say that is true. Chicago with the lake looks very different from Houston or Dallas which are both flat. Austin has hills and a prominent river downtown - again very different. Try saying that San Francisco look like other cities. :hand:

jokergirl
2009-Feb-11, 07:22 AM
I wasn't so fond of the population in Stuttgart, but I loved all the medieval markets. It just fits so well in a town that really still has the medieval look in places.
Speaking of medieval-looking cities, Tübingen (oops mixed that up), a small university town south of Stuttgart, is just awesomely pretty to look at. As is Ulm, a somewhat bigger town east of Stuttgart, and Meersburg, a town at the big lake south of there. (Lake Constance I think, in English)

http://joker.mirar.org/P?loc=meersburg/zeppelin1.jpg&get=shttp://joker.mirar.org/P?loc=meersburg/orange_lantern.jpg&get=s

(the first one is not for artistical value but for ZEPPELIN!)

;)

PetersCreek
2009-Feb-11, 07:33 PM
Speaking of medieval-looking cities, Tübingen (oops mixed that up), a small university town south of Stuttgart, is just awesomely pretty to look at. As is Ulm, a somewhat bigger town east of Stuttgart, and Meersburg, a town at the big lake south of there. (Lake Constance I think, in English)

I spent most of my time around Ludwigsburg, Kornwestheim, and in the area between Sulzbach and Schwäbish Hall but I made it down to Tübingen and Böblingen a time or two. I very much enjoyed Stuttgart's city center, too.

jokergirl
2009-Feb-11, 07:40 PM
I spent most of my time around Ludwigsburg, Kornwestheim, and in the area between Sulzbach and Schwäbish Hall but I made it down to Tübingen and Böblingen a time or two. I very much enjoyed Stuttgart's city center, too.

:eek: :eek: :eek: I used to live in Kornwestheim!!! When was that?!?

;)

PetersCreek
2009-Feb-11, 08:17 PM
That was late '94 to '98. I was stationed at Ramstein Air Base near Kaiserslautern but off duty, I was a member of a club that met in Kornwestheim.

jokergirl
2009-Feb-11, 10:30 PM
Aha :) I lived there when I wrote my first thesis, around 2003/04.

;)

geonuc
2009-Feb-12, 07:56 PM
I also really like Washington, DC. Just the presence of all the national museums makes it a great place to visit.

PetersCreek
2009-Feb-12, 08:05 PM
I also like DC a lot but only to visit and in reasonably-sized doses. Looks like I'll be there again for meetings in the middle of April.

geonuc
2009-Feb-12, 08:35 PM
I also like DC a lot but only to visit and in reasonably-sized doses.
Ditto. No way I'd live there.

crosscountry
2009-Feb-13, 02:38 PM
I've been in Boulder, CO for the last few days. It is gorgeous here, and I could even enjoy living in a place like this.

One thing that shocked me was what basic things cost. I parked downtown in a garage yesterday before breakfast and left after dinner. The bill came to $27! That was only 12 hours! Where I live they have day rates.

HenrikOlsen
2009-Feb-13, 07:24 PM
Small towns can exhibit a cookie-cutter nature just as readily. Here in Georgia, it seems every other small town was built around a central square with the courthouse in the middle. And that characteristic is certainly not limited to this state. Western towns in the US are also sometimes hard to differentiate.
And they all have three old guys sitting in the square talking about how much better it was before, and three young guys standing talking about how they're moving to the big city next year at the latest, and you just know that in 30 years they'll be the ones sitting in the square.