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Buttercup
2009-Feb-10, 10:18 PM
Saw this film in its entirety for the 1st time this weekend, on AMC. A couple of questions:

1. How did Tom Hagen [Robert Duvall] manage to not only decapitate the horse, but also carry it through the mansion [presumably staffed] to Mr. Woltz's bedroom without getting caught?

2. When Michael agrees to be godfather to sister Connie's newborn, it's Kay [sure looks like her] holding the infant as it is baptized. Did I see this incorrectly or was it a blooper? Michael and Kay only have the 1 toddler. Also I didn't seem to see Connie herself standing nearby or in the scene.

Another seeming discrepancy slips my mind; maybe I'll recall it.

Very entertaining. Al Pacino was very handsome. :)

Gillianren
2009-Feb-10, 10:30 PM
1. How did Tom Hagen [Robert Duvall] manage to not only decapitate the horse, but also carry it through the mansion [presumably staffed] to Mr. Woltz's bedroom without getting caught?

You know, I wondered about that myself.


2. When Michael agrees to be godfather to sister Connie's newborn, it's Kay [sure looks like her] holding the infant as it is baptized. Did I see this incorrectly or was it a blooper? Michael and Kay only have the 1 toddler. Also I didn't seem to see Connie herself standing nearby or in the scene.

I don't recall that, myself; is it possible that, if it was Kay, that she was the godmother?

Buttercup
2009-Feb-10, 10:38 PM
I don't recall that, myself; is it possible that, if it was Kay, that she was the godmother?

Well, the initial scene only shows Michael being asked to be the baby's godfather. I don't see Connie in the baptismal scene. If that is Kay [I seem to have seen blondish curls under the hat], she's definitely holding the baby for the priest as though it is her own.

Maybe that's how it works, but...where's Connie?

Josh
2009-Feb-10, 10:42 PM
1. Hagen didn't do it. That's not his end of the business. He reported what happened and then the Don Corleone had people do it. (It's all in the book) The fact that those lackeys or specialists could get into the room whilst Woltz slept is a testament to the Godfather's power and reach.

2. Not sure what you mean here. If Kay is holding the baby then it's because she's the godmother. Don't remember this scene .. but I'll watch it for the 1058943895 time tonight and get back to you!

I love this movie!!

Buttercup
2009-Feb-10, 10:46 PM
Okay, thanks Josh. :)

Just now recalled this :

From Internet Movie Database [i]Trivia:


According to an interview with Mario Puzo, the character of Johnny Fontane was not based on Frank Sinatra. However, everyone assumed that it was, and Sinatra was so incensed by it that he refused to speak to Puzo...

I hate to admit it, but it also very strongly crossed my mind that the Johnny Fontane character was based on Frank Sinatra. :shifty:

Josh
2009-Feb-10, 10:49 PM
Some interesting Godfather trivia (http://www.moviemistakes.com/film544/trivia). The oranges in every scene where someone dies is one to look out for. I hadn't noticed that.

Did I mention .. I Love this movie?

Buttercup
2009-Feb-10, 10:50 PM
And yet another seeming discrepancy: Where was Kay during Vito's funeral? We have Sonny and Michael sitting at casket's edge, with family beside and behind them. Yet Kay is nowhere to be seen; as traditional as the family is, wouldn't she be at Michael's side? I think so.

I wondered if Diane Keaton couldn't make filming that day due to illness or something, and they simply shot the scene "hoping nobody would notice."

Gillianren
2009-Feb-10, 10:51 PM
In a Catholic ceremony, the godmother will hold the baby at times. I don't remember what times, because it's been a long time since I've been to a Catholic baptism, but everyone, as I recall, holds the kid at least once.

And doesn't it bother you that the Sicilian Don Vito Corleone is played by the American Marlon Brando?

Buttercup
2009-Feb-10, 10:53 PM
Some interesting Godfather trivia (http://www.moviemistakes.com/film544/trivia). The oranges in every scene where someone dies is one to look out for. I hadn't noticed that.

:confused: I'm never accepting oranges as gifts again! ;)


Did I mention .. I Love this movie?

You just did. :)

Buttercup
2009-Feb-10, 11:01 PM
In a Catholic ceremony, the godmother will hold the baby at times. I don't remember what times, because it's been a long time since I've been to a Catholic baptism, but everyone, as I recall, holds the kid at least once.

Oh, okay. :)


And doesn't it bother you that the Sicilian Don Vito Corleone is played by the American Marlon Brando?

Hmmm, not really. My only complaint is he's mumbling half the time. :( I'm like speak up and enunciate! :rolleyes: [I would have requested that aloud, but for fear of bullets flying from the TV I kept my quiet :p ].

Who would you like to have seen portray Vito?

They were actually considering these fellows as well [egad!]


Ernest Borgnine, Edward G. Robinson, Orson Welles, and George C. Scott were considered by Paramount Pictures for the role of Vito Corleone. Burt Lancaster wanted the role but was never considered. When Paramount considered casting Italian producer Carlo Ponti, director Francis Ford Coppola objected, as Vito was Italian-American and more a New Yorker than Italian, and thus wouldn't speak with Ponti's Italian accent. When asked his opinion by the Paramount brass, Coppola said he wanted to cast either Laurence Olivier or Marlon Brando as the Don.

Josh
2009-Feb-10, 11:06 PM
[egad!]
Ha! I've been reading a lot of Dumas lately. All his characters are fond of saying Egad! I might start using it in conversation.

Gillian. Do you mean you have a prob with him sounding american? Or that you would have prefered an authentic silcilian born, american rasied actor?

Gillianren
2009-Feb-10, 11:26 PM
I'm saying Buttercup said--in the thread to which she has not returned--that people should only play characters of their own nationality. Vito Corleone was Sicilian. I didn't really have a problem with it. The character may have been described as more American than Italian, but Marlon Brando was born in Omaha of German and Dutch ancestry on his father's side and Irish and English ancestry on his mother's side. Which is, you know, not Italian at all.

Buttercup
2009-Feb-10, 11:29 PM
Oh...do we have to have cross-over reference? [and I think you've partially misunderstood me -- but that's a different thread] :(

And I thought Brando was Italian.

But this isn't about another topic, is it? No.

Gandalf223
2009-Feb-11, 05:11 AM
1. How did Tom Hagen [Robert Duvall] manage to not only decapitate the horse, but also carry it through the mansion [presumably staffed] to Mr. Woltz's bedroom without getting caught?

Luca Brazzi was Vito Corleone's go-to guy for that kind of thing. IIRC, there was a mention of Luca going to L.A. somewhere in the sequence. Leastways, I've always assumed it was Luca who did the dirty deed, and in fact Tom Hagen never did any "hands on" violence.


Some interesting Godfather trivia (http://www.moviemistakes.com/film544/trivia). The oranges in every scene where someone dies is one to look out for. I hadn't noticed that.

Great. I just watched the Godfather trilogy about 6 months ago, now I gotta watch 'em all over again! (The only scene I can recall oranges in, is Brando's finale.)

Josh
2009-Feb-11, 05:13 AM
Great. I just watched the Godfather trilogy about 6 months ago, now I gotta watch 'em all over again! (The only scene I can recall oranges in, is Brando's finale.)

When Don Corleone gets shot there's oranges ... and he had just been playing with oranges when he died.

novaderrik
2009-Feb-11, 10:00 AM
i tried watching this movie once, and just couldn't do it.
guess i'm just not sophisticated enough..

Josh
2009-Feb-11, 09:34 PM
i tried watching this movie once, and just couldn't do it.
guess i'm just not sophisticated enough..

Maybe read the book? It's goooood.

Buttercup
2009-Feb-11, 10:09 PM
I might give the book a read. :) At a future date; I'm currently knee-deep in a mini-avalanche of books as it is.

I tried reading Henry Hill's book [of "Goodfellas"] fame around 4 years ago. Not a good read [and besides, Ray Liotta's handsome].

Josh
2009-Feb-11, 10:42 PM
I enjoyed most of Puzo's books.

The Sicilian is really good. As is The Last Don and Omerta. I haven't read his forays into non-mafia related topics. I start The Fourth K but couldn't get into it.

Moose
2009-Feb-11, 11:09 PM
I did read The Last Don, and I enjoyed it. Not sure if I've read The Sicilian or not. I'd have to check my bookshelf. There's one I nibbled at briefly but didn't get into.

Josh
2009-Feb-11, 11:17 PM
The Sicilian is about Salvatore 'Turi' Giulliano. The story happens in the time that Michael Corleone goes and hides in Sicily. I think it's my favourite Puzo book.

Buttercup
2009-Feb-11, 11:36 PM
...that's another strange thing: Michael, going to hide out in Sicily. Yeah, who'd think to look for him THERE? :rolleyes:

Should have gone to Chicago.

Moose
2009-Feb-12, 12:46 AM
He'd have still been well within the jurisdiction of the cops/feds/etc. In Sicily, he was out of their reach. Hiding anywhere else, he'd be away from the protection of his family. Still...

Yeah, Josh, I didn't read The Sicilian. *chuckle* I might track down a copy, though.

HenrikOlsen
2009-Feb-12, 03:04 PM
Ha! I've been reading a lot of Dumas lately. All his characters are fond of saying Egad! I might start using it in conversation.
Did they all get translated by the same person?
Sometimes repetitive mannerisms over several books are an artifact of the translator's limited range rather than being something that was there in the original.

weatherc
2009-Feb-12, 03:53 PM
I'm trying to remember if the characters in the translation of The Count of Monte Cristo that I read said "Egad!" or if it was written as "Mon Dieu!" I don't recall seeing "Egad!" in that book, but it was a few years ago when I read it.

Buttercup
2009-Feb-12, 05:06 PM
Egad!

Seriously, and not merely to belabor a point, but Michael fleeing to Sicily didn't make sense to me on the following counts: Sicily's a tiny nation and in the 1940's strongly traditionalist, filled with "everyone knows everyone" villages. He comes along with non-chalant appearing bodyguards [3 men traipsing around the country roads not working and not looking rich wouldn't arouse curiosity?], and though speaks the language fluently would likely have "an American accent" to it.

BigDon
2009-Feb-12, 05:45 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buttercup
1. How did Tom Hagen [Robert Duvall] manage to not only decapitate the horse, but also carry it through the mansion [presumably staffed] to Mr. Woltz's bedroom without getting caught?



And Gillian sez:
You know, I wondered about that myself.

It actually speaks in both of your's favor that you don't know how this could be.

Josh pretty much has the right of it. It's not the consiglieri's end of the business.

Bolasanibk
2009-Feb-12, 06:23 PM
Egad!

Seriously, and not merely to belabor a point, but Michael fleeing to Sicily didn't make sense to me on the following counts: Sicily's a tiny nation and in the 1940's strongly traditionalist, filled with "everyone knows everyone" villages. He comes along with non-chalant appearing bodyguards [3 men traipsing around the country roads not working and not looking rich wouldn't arouse curiosity?], and though speaks the language fluently would likely have "an American accent" to it.

Because the common folk had a strong respect for the local dons and would not talk to the authorities regarding matters of the dons? Omerta?

Thats what I always took it to be. Could be wrong though.

vonmazur
2009-Feb-12, 06:48 PM
Michele Corleone was under the protection of his Father's old buddy, Don Tomasina, the man who helped him to kill the old Don who killed all of Vito Andolini's Family.....One of the better scenes in Godfather "Due"....."Andolini, i ecce per te.....Figlio de Puta..." and dies on the spot....Remember he complains about the young people having no respect, and how he pays them to protect Michael, but the bodyguards still got bribed by Barzini back in New York and Michael's Car blows up with Apollonia in it.....

Dale in Alabama

Gillianren
2009-Feb-12, 07:06 PM
It actually speaks in both of your's favor that you don't know how this could be.

Josh pretty much has the right of it. It's not the consiglieri's end of the business.

It does still require sneaking the thing into the house and not having the guy wake up. It's still a little odd, you must admit.

BigDon
2009-Feb-12, 08:43 PM
It does still require sneaking the thing into the house and not having the guy wake up. It's still a little odd, you must admit.

Ahh, you make some asumptions though.

You don't know that one of his own servants wasn't coerced into making the final delivery.

Plus in my day I knew some serious burglars. That little trick would have been nothing to this guy.

Had he not been an old family friend... People you grow up with often take very different roads than you do. But how do you hate somebody who makes a point of visiting your sick mother every Thanksgiving and Christmas? And who would have thought my mother would outlive him?

mahesh
2009-Feb-12, 09:15 PM
...that's another strange thing: Michael, going to hide out in Sicily. Yeah, who'd think to look for him THERE? :rolleyes: ...

On a similar contrarian note, Buttercup, I remember reading an article, couple of years ago about this Israeli lady who was a primary school teacher.

During the regular historical tensions in that region, there was a bus bombing, one morning...you know..school runs and all that...

Lady A calls her friend, lady B, to ask about lady B's teacher daughter...
Lady B says that her daughter went to Auschwitz! (school trip with children).
Lady A comments "Oh thank God, she's safe there!"

...that just about floored me

Josh
2009-Feb-12, 10:42 PM
I'm trying to remember if the characters in the translation of The Count of Monte Cristo that I read said "Egad!" or if it was written as "Mon Dieu!" I don't recall seeing "Egad!" in that book, but it was a few years ago when I read it.
My Dumas books aren't all translated by the same person. And throughout each book, both Mon Dieu and Egad are used freiquently. I tried both on for size last night and got weird looks both times. meh.


...that's another strange thing: Michael, going to hide out in Sicily. Yeah, who'd think to look for him THERE? ...
And Buttercup, Bolasanibk is on the money. The culture of Sicily meant that you didn't talk about anything. Omerta. Even if he was seen there, no one - knowing that Don Tommasino was his protector - would have said anything. That's why it took them so long to find him. I think he's gone for about two years.

Buttercup
2009-Feb-12, 11:15 PM
Okay, thanks Bolasanibk and Josh.

swansont
2009-Feb-13, 11:55 AM
I remember seeing The Godfather on one of the cable stations once with some extra scenes in it; don't know if it was the "Director's cut" or what, but it improved the movie IMO. There was an additional scene where they discuss how they knew Pauli was responsible for setting up the hit on the Don, and (IIRC) Sonny was originally suspicious that it might have been Clemenza. There were one or two other added scenes, but that one was the most memorable.