PDA

View Full Version : The next big planetary mission: Europa and Jupiter



tusenfem
2009-Feb-18, 07:06 PM
Yeah! My "retirement project" has been elected by ESA and NASA.

Read all about it here:
http://www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/features/20090218.html

Let's go to Jupiter, Europa and Ganymede!

ToSeek
2009-Feb-18, 09:16 PM
centsworth_II (http://www.bautforum.com/1437273-post28.html) noted this in the discussion thread, but this deserves a thread of its own:

NASA and ESA Prioritize Outer Planet Missions (http://www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/features/20090218.html)


NASA and ESA agreed that the Europa Jupiter System Mission, called Laplace in Europe, was the most technically feasible to do first. However, ESA's Solar System Working Group concluded the scientific merits of this mission and a Titan Saturn System Mission could not be separated. The group recommended, and NASA agreed, that both missions should move forward for further study and implementation.

"The decision means a win, win situation for all parties involved," said Ed Weiler, associate administrator for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. "Although the Jupiter system mission has been chosen to proceed to an earlier flight opportunity, a Saturn system mission clearly remains a high priority for the science community."

Both agencies will need to undertake several more steps and detailed studies before officially moving forward.
...
The Europa Jupiter System Mission would use two robotic orbiters to conduct unprecedentedly detailed studies of the giant gaseous planet Jupiter and its moons Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. NASA would build one orbiter, initially named Jupiter Europa. ESA would build the other orbiter, initially named Jupiter Ganymede. The probes would launch in 2020 on two separate launch vehicles from different launch sites. The orbiters would reach the Jupiter system in 2026 and spend at least three years conducting research.

Swift
2009-Feb-18, 09:38 PM
Would it be fair to say that Laplace will be a transformational mission? :D

slang
2009-Feb-18, 09:47 PM
"retirement project" ... Why that, tusenfem? Because it'll arrive by the time you're ready to call it quits? (and should a moderator merge this with ToSeek's thread or vice versa?)

Swift
2009-Feb-18, 09:49 PM
(and should a moderator merge this with ToSeek's thread or vice versa?)
Yes, I believe a moderator should :D

Launch window
2009-Feb-18, 10:34 PM
I got a question what is this mission called? I've read EJSM, Laplace and JMO. Are they going to amalgamate all these names into "EJSM-Laplace-JMO"? The Cassini-Huygens name was ok, but a name like this is just ridiculous. I hope NASA/ESA comes up with a catchier name. PS I'm delighted Europa was picked, since we've already done a dedicated mission on the Saturn system.

tusenfem
2009-Feb-19, 08:06 AM
Ohhh so many questions! (but not as many as the emails I got from the disfunctional mailing list for Laplace, about 400).



"retirement project" ... Why that, tusenfem?


Well launch at the earliest in 2019 and a flight of about 7 years makes it 2026. I was born in 1963, so that JOI will be when I am 63 years old (at the earliest). I can just hope that the retirement age here in Austria will be upped to 70 by that time.



Yes, I believe a moderator should


Well, at least I was not ToSeeked, but that may be because his laptop is out of order.



I got a question what is this mission called? I've read EJSM, Laplace and JMO.


That is because it is a joined mission. The European part will definitely be called Laplace, the EJSM (Europa Jupiter System Mission) is the NASA name and JMO (Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter) would be the JAXA addition (which I am not sure if it is in already). I think Laplace is a nicer name, concise. The spacecraft will be (JEO, JPO which will turn into JGO (just to annoy the French) and JMO)



I'm delighted Europa was picked, since we've already done a dedicated mission on the Saturn system.


The Tandem team was advised to resubmit their proposal for the next cosmic vision L-mission announcement of opportunity.



Would it be fair to say that Laplace will be a transformational mission?


I think all the spacecraft together will resonate pretty well.

KaiYeves
2009-Feb-19, 03:16 PM
Woo-hoo!

EDG
2009-Feb-19, 03:38 PM
Yeah! My "retirement project" has been elected by ESA and NASA.

Read all about it here:
http://www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/features/20090218.html

Let's go to Jupiter, Europa and Ganymede!


*Squeeee!*
I'm all for the Ganymede orbiter! (though it's a bit sobering to think that I'll be in my 50s by the time it gets there...)

tusenfem
2009-Feb-20, 02:39 PM
Well, just one word of caution!
Laplace is now in the next phase, but will have to compete with an astronomical mission in the cosmic vision L projects. So, it is not definite yet. However, now we get so spend lots of money developing instruments and stuff.

Dgennero
2009-Feb-21, 08:53 PM
If we'd coat the Europa lander with a radioactive bottom, we could just melt through the ice and go inside the sublunar sea :)

centsworth_II
2009-Feb-21, 08:58 PM
If we'd coat the Europa lander with a radioactive bottom, we could just melt through the ice and go inside the sublunar sea :)
Of course, the heat for any melt-probe is going to come from nuclear material (am I missing some other possibility?). Coating the bottom of a lander is probably not the most efficient use of the material though.

We've got a long time to think about it though. First a Europan orbiter, Then a Titan mission. And then a Europan lander/melt probe... in 20 or thirty years! (And that's start of mission.)

01101001
2009-Apr-14, 06:07 PM
Planetary Society Blog: Ted Stryk: Europa Jupiter System Mission Colloquium (http://planetary.org/blog/article/00001911/)


On April 9, the University of Tennessee's Earth and Planetary Sciences department hosted a colloquium led by Bob Pappalardo of JPL to discuss the recently selected Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM).

[...]

All in all, it was a very interesting and informative presentation. Pappalardo was headed to Vienna, Austria, to go to a meeting on planetary protection requirements for the mission. It will be interesting to see how planning unfolds in the coming months, as the process by which people can propose instruments will be starting this summer.

Ilya
2009-Jun-10, 03:09 AM
I was hoping they would pick Saturn mission. Not so much because I find Titan/Enceladus more fascinating than Europa (although I do, by slight margin), but because of the opportunity for smaller missions in the same time period.

If TSSM got the go-ahead for 2018-2020 launch, then next two decades very likely would see several Juno-size Jupiter probes, keeping Jupiter science alive before next "flagship" in 2025-2030 timeframe. Whereas now the chances of similar missions to Saturn are pretty much nil. Nothing until next Saturn flagship, whenever THAT happens. And after Juno, almost certainly no mid-size Jupiter probes either -- why bother if EJSM will overshadow it?

PraedSt
2009-Jun-10, 12:09 PM
Well, just one word of caution!
Laplace is now in the next phase, but will have to compete with an astronomical mission in the cosmic vision L projects. So, it is not definite yet. However, now we get so spend lots of money developing instruments and stuff.
I just saw this thread. Despite your caveat, congratulations tusenfem!

And I note that this is a joint US-Euro mission. Please remind NASA that your numbers are in meters! :)

KaiYeves
2009-Jun-10, 10:28 PM
They got Cassini right, didn't they?

PraedSt
2009-Jun-10, 11:10 PM
They got Cassini right, didn't they?
Ha! We'll never know how much software was rewritten. :whistle:

GOURDHEAD
2009-Jun-11, 01:23 PM
I'd like to see rovers on the surfaces of each of the Gallilean moons.

slang
2009-Jun-12, 07:32 AM
They got Cassini right, didn't they?

Yeah but Huygens hit Titan! ;)

Dgennero
2009-Jun-12, 03:17 PM
@Gourdhead: I second that.
And btw., when I wrote in another thread that I'd like to see a descent probe into Uranus, it was not an either/or question.
I know this forum strongly discourages (to use a euphemism) political aspects, but I can't help thinking about how far the money we spent on a certain recent military operation would bring us when it comes to solar system exploration.
Where should we go, what should we do (unmanned missions)? This:
- rovers on all of the Galilean moons
- melt-through probe into Europa
- sophisticated descent probe into one of the gas planets
- rover on Titan
All of it, and soon, please.

KaiYeves
2009-Jun-13, 01:56 AM
Yeah but Huygens hit Titan!
Oh no, the fish will drown!