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gzhpcu
2009-Feb-27, 08:37 PM
From the point of view of cosmology, the vacuum appears to have an energy density, which is sometimes called “dark energy” or the “cosmological constant”, responsible for the observed accelerated expansion of the universe. It is estimated to be 10-29 grams per cc (1 proton per cubic foot).

Ordinary matter slows down the expansion, whereas vacuum energy speeds it up.

In the Standard Model of particle physics, all particles are massless, unless they interact with a special field, called the Higgs field. All elementary particles travel at the speed of light. Those with mass, however, are slowed down by the Higgs field which permeates the vacuum. Higgs field is a vacuum field with no source. The Higgs mechanism fills all of space with a field. Unlike the gravitational field, which is strong around the Sun and the centre of the galaxy, the Higgs field would have essentially the same value everywhere. It is estimated that the energy of the Higgs field results in a trillion tons per cubic center. Using that figure in GR, the universe should expand in less than a nanosecond to a billion times its current size


Ugly solution: Quantum Field Theory needs to find another field with negative energy (this is allowed by QFT) to cancel out most of the energy of the Higgs field, leaving exactly 10-29 grams per cc.

Apparently, nobody has a clue as to what this mysterious field is. (Always assuming that a Higgs field really exists. Hopefully, the Large Hadron Collider will be able to resolve the question...)

trinitree88
2009-Feb-28, 06:48 PM
From the point of view of cosmology, the vacuum appears to have an energy density, which is sometimes called “dark energy” or the “cosmological constant”, responsible for the observed accelerated expansion of the universe. It is estimated to be 10-29 grams per cc (1 proton per cubic foot).

Ordinary matter slows down the expansion, whereas vacuum energy speeds it up.

In the Standard Model of particle physics, all particles are massless, unless they interact with a special field, called the Higgs field. All elementary particles travel at the speed of light. Those with mass, however, are slowed down by the Higgs field which permeates the vacuum. Higgs field is a vacuum field with no source. The Higgs mechanism fills all of space with a field. Unlike the gravitational field, which is strong around the Sun and the centre of the galaxy, the Higgs field would have essentially the same value everywhere. It is estimated that the energy of the Higgs field results in a trillion tons per cubic center. Using that figure in GR, the universe should expand in less than a nanosecond to a billion times its current size


Ugly solution: Quantum Field Theory needs to find another field with negative energy (this is allowed by QFT) to cancel out most of the energy of the Higgs field, leaving exactly 10-29 grams per cc.

Apparently, nobody has a clue as to what this mysterious field is. (Always assuming that a Higgs field really exists. Hopefully, the Large Hadron Collider will be able to resolve the question...)


gzhpcu If the energy of the Higgs field was a trillion tons/cc then the mass is the same, and that ought to show up in gravitational effects. It doesn't. When E=mc2...it doesn't matter if you use "m" in kilograms or E/c2..it's equivalent.
In the Standard Model, only the force carriers are massless, colored gluons and photons. The Z can be massless if it is a photon/antiphoton or a neutrino/antineutrino pair, which qualifies as a graviton.(Gamow).
The purported energy density of the vacuum is off by a mere 10120 orders of magnitude, a result that was, and is absurd.
The clue is that you cannot distinguish between gravitational mass and inertial mass to about 8 significant figures in all experiments to date. If you obey SR, and all massive particles seen to date do so explicitly, then your inertial mass seems to increase according to gamma...that's how they confine particle beams explicitly in synchrotrons and linacs.
But, there remains the annoying corollary. The day/night diurnal oscillation at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory shows that the mass of the Earth not only creates a GR gravitational well, but a distinct and experimentally measurable oscillation in the solar neutrino flux,seen, peer-reviewed and published in Ontario, and presumably also in the universal neutrino flux (as yet not fully plumbed). As any particle accelerates in the universal neutrino sea, it experiences a Doppler-shift of the neutrino frequencies. Those interactions are modified by changes in the cross-sections which occur as a square of the the new energy values...see Peltoniemi's Ultimate Neutrino Page. clue.... pete

SNO page published:http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/sno/results_04_02/DayNight/sno_daynight_results.pdf

gamma,...see:http://my.morningside.edu/slaven/Physics/relativity/relativity6.html

Ultimate Neutrino Page...cross-sections see:http://cupp.oulu.fi/neutrino/nd-cross.html

Cougar
2009-Feb-28, 09:12 PM
The purported energy density of the vacuum is off by a mere 10120 orders of magnitude, a result that was, and is absurd.

Yes, a famous, uh... discrepancy. I'd like to know what calculation is entailed to produce the expected mass-energy content of the vacuum. This apparently involves Heisenberg and an accurate average duration and mass-energy contribution of the fleeting pair productions out of the vacuum...

And what would that have anything to do with dark energy, which acts in weak opposition to the gravitational attraction of objects with mass, which would include the pairs being produced? (As if anybody said it did...)