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Click Ticker
2009-Mar-03, 02:28 PM
That's all.

pghnative
2009-Mar-03, 02:35 PM
Rats, and I forgot to send a card. Will try to remember next time.

Of course, seven years from now my memory will be even worse...

hhEb09'1
2009-Mar-03, 02:45 PM
Do you mean 7 years 1 month and 1 day from now?

jlhredshift
2009-Mar-03, 02:47 PM
Well, something I have always wondered, has the square root of PI been proven to also be a transcendental number?

JustAFriend
2009-Mar-03, 03:03 PM
Personally, I'm waiting for PI Day (3/14).

Eating pie is much more fun than munching on roots....

hhEb09'1
2009-Mar-03, 03:31 PM
Well, something I have always wondered, has the square root of PI been proven to also be a transcendental number?
I believe algebraic numbers are closed under multiplication (http://homepages.cwi.nl/~dik/english/mathematics/numf.html)(and addition), so if the square root of PI were not transcendental, its square would not be either.

tdvance
2009-Mar-03, 03:31 PM
Well, something I have always wondered, has the square root of PI been proven to also be a transcendental number?

Pi transcendental means sqrt(pi) is as well, as a polynomial with sqrt(pi) as a root could easily be converted into one with pi as a root.

jlhredshift
2009-Mar-03, 03:39 PM
Thank you both for the correct answer and I kind of new that. But, because this is OTB I was looking for a smart butt, but humorous answer.:whistle:

Fazor
2009-Mar-03, 03:51 PM
Personally, I'm waiting for PI Day (3/14).

Eating pie is much more fun than munching on roots....

Ah, but since we already passed the year 1592, the next real Pi day is ...

13,917 years away. I *might not* be around to celebrate it.

NEOWatcher
2009-Mar-03, 05:09 PM
And since nobody provided an article about it yet.

USA Today's take (http://www.usatoday.com/news/offbeat/2009-03-02-squarerootday_N.htm) on the subject.



Celebrations are as varied: Some cut root vegetables into squares, others make food in the shape of a square root symbol.



"These days are like calendar comets, you wait and wait and wait for them, then they brighten up your day and poof they're gone," he said.

Ok; but I feel sorry for those who "wait and wait and wait" for them. I guess they don't have much else to look forward to.

Fazor
2009-Mar-03, 05:16 PM
Ok; but I feel sorry for those who "wait and wait and wait" for them. I guess they don't have much else to look forward to.
Lol. Es verdad. Oh well, take joy where you can find it I guess.

Ivan Viehoff
2009-Mar-03, 05:30 PM
At least this one doesn't depend upon whether you write dates in the parochial American format, or a sensible format (as used by the great majority of the planet) instead.

hhEb09'1
2009-Mar-03, 06:16 PM
Is that the 9 3 3 format then?

pghnative
2009-Mar-03, 06:20 PM
Do you mean 7 years 1 month and 1 day from now?No. I expect a "new math" to be installed after the chaos from the galactic alignment in 2012.:whistle:

Buttercup
2009-Mar-03, 06:53 PM
Gosh, what a square! :rolleyes: :)

Chuck
2009-Mar-03, 07:31 PM
2016 is also the 63rd triangular number. The wild double celebration might bring down civilization.

Ivan Viehoff
2009-Mar-04, 01:58 PM
Is that the 9 3 3 format then?
I agree that ymd is the most sensible and consistent format, since numerical significance moves in the same direction throughout, ie, both for the three components, and for the digits used for each of the three components. Ie, if we write 20090303 then we can simply use a "greater than" or "less than" function to line the dates in order. But so far I have only found Sweden to use it as the standard format. But at least the most common international choice of dmy moves in a consistent direction of significance for the three components. mdy is just a mess.

Click Ticker
2009-Mar-04, 02:46 PM
To me, MDY seems quite natural. In part because I grew up with it. I'm not ranking the significance of each number and putting them in any order. I'm delivering the date the way I would speak. When somebody asks, "What's the date?" I'm going to say, "March 4th." I typically don't respond, "The 4th of March."

In "the rest of the world", when writing out the date, do you use:

4th of March, 2009

or

March 4th, 2009?

Or is it always done numerically?

Ivan Viehoff
2009-Mar-04, 03:44 PM
I typically don't respond, "The 4th of March."
In "the rest of the world", when writing out the date, do you use:
4th of March, 2009
or
March 4th, 2009?
In Britain, it is common and perfectly normal to say "the fourth of March", though "March the fourth" is also heard. The rhyme "Remember, remember the fifth of November..." wouldn't work otherwise. In French "le quatre Mars" is universal, never "quatrieme" (except the first day of the month), nor inverted. Spanish is universally "el cuatro de Marzo" (again except the first day of the month), even in the Spanish-speaking Americas. I think this structure is common in many languages.

We commonly write "4 March 2009"; "th" and comma are optional. In long form writing, it is acceptable to write "March 4th, 2009" (comma compulsory). But 4/3/2009 is unambiguously 4th of March across Europe and most of the world, unless it is suspected that it has been infected by American.

Click Ticker
2009-Mar-04, 03:57 PM
We commonly write "4 March 2009"; "th" and comma are optional. In long form writing, it is acceptable to write "March 4th, 2009" (comma compulsory). But 4/3/2009 is unambiguously 4th of March across Europe and most of the world, unless it is suspected that it has been infected by American.

Likely another thread, but I often wonder what led to the United States doing some of the things we do. The dates that you mention. I wonder what is the root of our writing it the way we do? Using F rather than C? Did the world at one time use F and we just didn't switch with them?

Ugh. Time to burn up google.

ETA: A couple of fun explanations:

http://askville.amazon.com/USA-work-fahrenheit-scale-Canada-works-celsius/AnswerViewer.do?requestId=14348841

HenrikOlsen
2009-Mar-04, 06:04 PM
Ie, if we write 20090303 then we can simply use a "greater than" or "less than" function to line the dates in order. But so far I have only found Sweden to use it as the standard format.
Japan and several internet standards does too.

SeanF
2009-Mar-04, 06:13 PM
The rhyme "Remember, remember the fifth of November..." wouldn't work otherwise.
So? In America, the date itself is usually "July 4th," but the holiday is "The 4th of July." :)

hhEb09'1
2009-Mar-04, 08:37 PM
I wonder what is the root of our writing it the way we do? Using F rather than C? Did the world at one time use F and we just didn't switch with them?C are associated with the metric system, and uh we find uh it has some utility. Film, telescopes, cigarettes, weight loss...

mugaliens
2009-Mar-04, 09:14 PM
Do you mean 7 years 1 month and 1 day from now?

I'm sure he did, but I think he forgot...

Is there something special about square roots? Where might I find some? All the ones I've seen are round.

mahesh
2009-Mar-04, 09:35 PM
I agree that ymd is the most sensible and consistent format, .... mdy is just a mess.

gimme ymd any time....despite having been laughed at ...patiently, awaiting the rest of the world to fall in line eventually and follow protocol.

mdy (numeric, short format; obviously upto twelve) confuses me tremendously, vis-a-vis dmy.

Mr Jenkins, i would have thought that March 04, 2009...rather than th, is more acceptable. I follow this. though i've seen March 04th, combination, to my consternation...as well...dumbing down English sensibilities....

Click Ticker
2009-Mar-04, 09:43 PM
Mr Jenkins, i would have thought that March 04, 2009...rather than th, is more acceptable.....

Either way, it's still MDY in the written form. Why so confusing in the numeric form?

mahesh
2009-Mar-04, 10:00 PM
Fourth of March or Third of April...etc...?

May the Fourth be with you.....

mugaliens
2009-Mar-04, 10:02 PM
With file systems still 1-dimensional, I started putting YYYYMMDD at the front as the date of the file with respect to its issue. The creation and modified dates aren't sufficient to deal with future or past events. I follow it with a dash, then the subject matter.

Oh, my kingdom for an n-dimensional FS!

pghnative
2009-Mar-05, 07:59 PM
Do you mean 7 years 1 month and 1 day from now?
I'm sure he did, but I think he forgot...Actually, I was simply not being precise about it, partly because I thought it would take away the fun for those (like me) that needed to think for a bit as to why the day was "Square Root Day"