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MaxB
2009-Mar-19, 08:55 PM
What would happen to a magnetic field as the object creating it--either a natural magnet or an electromagnet--approaches the speed of light? Would it distort somehow, or get "left behind"? Does Relativity provide the answer?

As before, I'm sorry if this is an obvious question that I could have found the answer to somewhere else, and thanks to everyone here for this forum.

trinitree88
2009-Mar-19, 10:36 PM
What would happen to a magnetic field as the object creating it--either a natural magnet or an electromagnet--approaches the speed of light? Would it distort somehow, or get "left behind"? Does Relativity provide the answer?

As before, I'm sorry if this is an obvious question that I could have found the answer to somewhere else, and thanks to everyone here for this forum.

In a quantum mechanical sense, the communication of electromagnetism occurs via virtual photons traveling at c, so you can have your field interact with objects in the forward light-cone. Near to, but not at c, this is ~ 45 degrees swept forward I think. You leave a virtual black hole in your wake. In SR events are described as time-like, space-like...etc. One of our SR experts will clarify, I'm sure. pete sorta:http://www.physics.usu.edu/peak/phys_3710_spr09/SR/Special_relativity_4.pdf

MaxB
2009-Mar-20, 01:30 AM
Thanks for your answer. It's beyond me, but, as far as I understand it, basically what I expected (I think). Since one could, theoretically, "fire off" electromagnets in a line--similar to in a particle accelerator (I'm pretty sure)--would it also be possible to make a magnetic field travel near light speed as it "jumped" from one electromagnet to another? Or do magnetic fields not work that way?

My thanks again.

cjameshuff
2009-Mar-20, 01:35 AM
Thanks for your answer. It's beyond me, but, as far as I understand it, basically what I expected (I think). Since one could, theoretically, "fire off" electromagnets in a line--similar to in a particle accelerator (I'm pretty sure)--would it also be possible to make a magnetic field travel near light speed as it "jumped" from one electromagnet to another? Or do magnetic fields not work that way?

You've pretty much just described an antenna.

MaxB
2009-Mar-20, 02:23 AM
Right, but I was thinking about more of a "strong" magnetic field rather than waves of broadcast energy. I guess my question is: Would one electromagnet traveling near light speed create a magnetic field with the same characteristics as a hundred zillion electromagnets lined up next to each other that would fire in sequence so as to make a "virtually moving" magnetic field going at the same speed? Would there be a difference?

All my thanks for bearing with me.