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Buttercup
2009-Mar-21, 05:08 PM
Buttercup usually doesn't feel misanthropic...

...but today she did. :shifty:

The Saturday a.m. Farmer's Market: Hosted in a downtown plaza. Narrow walkways. Lots of quality jewelry, baked goods, leather products, art work (professional quality), kitschy-cute stuff, handicrafts.

And now? Dogs.

Dozens of dogs.

On leashes of course. Their owners walking them up and down the narrow, already crowded (with bipeds) walkways. :confused: As if there already aren't enough obstacles what with free-standing permanent sculptures, children, people in motorized chairs.

Haven't visited the Farmer's Market in months. That time and previously it was humans-only. Then apparently someone got the bright idea of bringing Fluffy and Cutesy-Pie with them and now EVERYONE's walking their dog too.

I thought it was the Farmer's Market, not a city park. :hand:

It's also become somewhat common to see dogs brought into home-improvement stores like Lowe's and The Home Depot. :(

The first time someone brings a (non-visually-impaired/help/professionally trained) dog into a restaurant around here, Buttercup will lose her cool. :)

I like dogs. But not at the Farmer's Market nor in stores!

nauthiz
2009-Mar-21, 05:21 PM
At least around here, I'm pretty sure it's illegal for non-service dogs to be in restaurants. Against health codes or something.

I wouldn't mind dogs in stores so much, except most the people around here who have dogs aren't familiar with the basics of their operation and maintenance.

Buttercup
2009-Mar-21, 05:28 PM
At least around here, I'm pretty sure it's illegal for non-service dogs to be in restaurants. Against health codes or something.

I would hope so. The last thing I want is someone's "Spot" sidling up to our table begging for a treat, or jowling off their master's plate next table over.


I wouldn't mind dogs in stores so much, except most the people around here who have dogs aren't familiar with the basics of their operation and maintenance.

I have a problem with it because some of them bark at strangers. And there's always the possibility of a dog fight. I can get that at a park during evening walks.

I can't and wouldn't take my cat to a store. Where does it end?

There are also people who have allergies or are afraid of dogs. I'm neither, btw.

Not everyone thinks the other person's pet is so cute/wonderful/adorable. :rolleyes:

Gillianren
2009-Mar-21, 06:10 PM
Well, I don't like dogs, so take this rant for what it's worth.

A lot of people who own dogs shouldn't. As an example, the apartment complex across the street has no size limit on dogs allowed to live there. One of my friends used to share an apartment with a woman who had two large dogs, but since neither he nor their other roommate liked dogs, they lived almost exclusively in the woman's room, and she apparently took quite some time to see this as a problem. It was one thing when the neighbours at my old apartment had a Pomeranian. It's quite another to have a big dog without a yard.

I went to an SCA event once wherein one group tied their (really pretty vicious) dog up next to one of the port-a-potties. They kept the dog muzzled in their encampment, which already pretty much guarantees that it's not a dog that belongs onsite, but they didn't muzzle him when they left him tied up there all day. I think the Humane Society was called in the end.

Our farmers' market (which doesn't open until next month) has a pretty big "No Pets Allowed" sign. On the other hand, I'm not sure where I'd complain if there suddenly were people with pets there. The only reason it would happen, though, is the class of people who believe that everyone likes dogs and there's no reason not to bring their dogs everywhere. Unfortunately, it is now becoming fashionable to carry little dogs in large handbags, which means, yes, I've seen a dog or two at Target. Chihuahuas are not service animals.

ETA: Oh, yeah. My alma mater has a pretty firm leash policy. Dogs must be on leashes at all times. So there are people, a pretty scary amount of them, who will put a leash on the dog and let the dog wander around, dragging the leash.

Buttercup
2009-Mar-21, 06:17 PM
Gillianren:
Our farmers' market (which doesn't open until next month) has a pretty big "No Pets Allowed" sign. On the other hand, I'm not sure where I'd complain if there suddenly were people with pets there.

My local newspaper has a "Sound Off!" section for community compliments, suggestions, complaints. I tried telephoning but unfortunately the voice mail won't answer. Will try again Monday.


The only reason it would happen, though, is the class of people who believe that everyone likes dogs and there's no reason not to bring their dogs everywhere.

Yep. >:-\ And how codependent are these people? I don't have to drag my cat around with me everywhere. Maybe that's why I'm more of a cat person (don't always have to have "my friend" around?) :p


Unfortunately, it is now becoming fashionable to carry little dogs in large handbags, which means, yes, I've seen a dog or two at Target. Chihuahuas are not service animals.

I've seen that too. Agreed.

Pets aren't children. I wish some people would get that through their heads.

nauthiz
2009-Mar-21, 06:21 PM
I have a problem with it because some of them bark at strangers. And there's always the possibility of a dog fight. I can get that at a park during evening walks.

That falls under the basics of operation and maintenance. One of the most basic of those guidelines is, if your dog barks at strangers then don't take it to a place that's likely to be full of strangers (including the park) until you teach it to mind its manners.


It's sort of like how I don't mind parents bringing children to stores, but I do mind parents bringing children who don't know not to run screaming up and down the aisles to stores. If they can't handle the stimulation (or understimulation), then they shouldn't be exposed to it. If they can, then I've got more annoying things to be annoyed about, like the guy with the cell phone.

Gillianren
2009-Mar-21, 06:59 PM
Yep. >:-\ And how codependent are these people? I don't have to drag my cat around with me everywhere. Maybe that's why I'm more of a cat person (don't always have to have "my friend" around?) :p

Well, and for heaven's sake, even if I did take my cat places, I wouldn't expect everyone to like him, and I wouldn't let him climb all over anyone who took his fancy. Now, this is in part because he'd be trembling and otherwise freaking out, because he's not used to a lot of people, but it's also because I know that some people just don't like cats. It's true. On the other hand, to a lot of people, if you don't like dogs, there's something wrong with you.


Pets aren't children. I wish some people would get that through their heads.

Some people treat their pets better than they treat their children.

Buttercup
2009-Mar-21, 07:07 PM
On the other hand, to a lot of people, if you don't like dogs, there's something wrong with you.

Like my sister. She's disowned me. :lol: Well sort of, anyway. The entire family are dog lovers to the max...and I'm a cat person.


Some people treat their pets better than they treat their children.

Yes, that can be true.

Some folks with their pets remind me of overly (excessively, endlessly) doting grandparents: Sure the grandkids are cute and adorable...but much more so to them than ever could be to others or myself. :rolleyes:

nauthiz
2009-Mar-21, 07:14 PM
I've got a colleague at work who:

1) hateshateshatesHATES it when people talk about their kids.

2)will.
not.
stop.
talking.
about.
her.
dog.

Buttercup
2009-Mar-21, 07:20 PM
I've got a colleague at work who:

1) hateshateshatesHATES it when people talk about their kids.

2)will.
not.
stop.
talking.
about.
her.
dog.

:lol: That's either a form of projection or her strange idea of "getting even."

Buttercup
2009-Mar-21, 07:22 PM
...and ironically, I crossed paths with Anne and Steve at the Market. Friends of ours. And sure enough both were walking a dog. I didn't say anything but sure felt like blurting out, "You two too, huh?" >:-p

Tucson_Tim
2009-Mar-21, 07:27 PM
...and I'm a cat person.




So, do you spit up hair balls? Which isn't so bad considering "dog people" drink from the toilet. :)

Gillianren
2009-Mar-21, 08:20 PM
Which isn't so bad considering "dog people" drink from the toilet. :)

Sadly, my cat drinks out of the toilet. We've told him it's beneath his feline dignity, but he seems not to have any.

Tucson_Tim
2009-Mar-21, 08:23 PM
Sadly, my cat drinks out of the toilet. We've told him it's beneath his feline dignity, but he seems not to have any.

We have a cat that does that too. We have another cat that will only drink from a dripping faucet. Oh well . . .

Buttercup
2009-Mar-21, 08:34 PM
So, do you spit up hair balls?

I'll never tell.

*cough-ACK!*

:shifty: Excuse me.

Speaking of dogs (again), the neighbor's is a cute little runt named Cookie. He's a Yorkie mix (mutt) with oversized ears and tail; amusing. He struts up and down the chain-link fence barking furiously at all passersby as though he's *MIGHTY!* :p Usually I don't like nervous little yappy dogs, but Cookie's an amusing exception.

Just so long as neighbor doesn't take Cookie to the Farmer's Market...

Tinaa
2009-Mar-21, 08:41 PM
Sometimes I like my cats and dogs better than my kids.

Tucson_Tim
2009-Mar-21, 08:52 PM
Sometimes I like my cats and dogs better than my kids.

I think it's the unconditional love that they offer up. Humans sometimes put conditions on their love, although very small children tend to offer it up unconditionally.

Rue
2009-Mar-21, 09:31 PM
Very ironic i should find this thread, fore today at our Farmers' Market I saw a sight I had never seen before. Some people had what looked like a small puppy inside a specially designed pink stroller (a sort of kennel with wheels). They were carrying it down some stairs in the same way parents may struggle with a stroller designed for the human sort of baby.

sarongsong
2009-Mar-21, 11:16 PM
What I've noticed about the few dogs at the local Farmers' Market here is how they seem to be on their very best behavior, as if it's a special treat they want to experience again the next week.

geonuc
2009-Mar-22, 10:27 AM
I very much don't care for dogs (yes, there is one sitting on her pillow just in the other room even as I type). Especially the barking variety, which I define as a dog who has barked more than once in its life.

That said, the local farmer's market I frequent attracts many people with dogs. By and large, these dogs are well behaved and don't get in the way too much. So I don't mind it there. That market is not the type with narrow pathways, though. It's more of an open area.

We also have neighborhood festivals here and they are popular with the doglovers, too. There, however, I don't like to see the dogs at all. It's too crowded and the leashes are always getting entangled.

I could say something about the parents with their SUV strollers, as well, but I won't.

mugaliens
2009-Mar-22, 02:59 PM
At least around here, I'm pretty sure it's illegal for non-service dogs to be in restaurants. Against health codes or something.

Well... If they're wearing shirt and shoes? :lol:


I wouldn't mind dogs in stores so much, except most the people around here who have dogs aren't familiar with the basics of their operation and maintenance.

I'm against it for several reasons, but mainly those involving kids, sanitation, and allergies. Most people don't have violent allergic reactions do dogs. Some people do have severe reactions to cats. Of course, walking a cat on a leash is a bit tricky...

Regardless, even if you pet never does the deed in the store, that doesn't stop your pet from spread germs and parasites all over the places young children tend to play.

nauthiz
2009-Mar-22, 03:21 PM
Regardless, even if you pet never does the deed in the store, that doesn't stop your pet from spread germs and parasites all over the places young children tend to play.

. . . thus making taking your children to the store almost as risky a proposition as taking your children outdoors.

HenrikOlsen
2009-Mar-23, 03:16 AM
Of course, walking a cat on a leash is a bit tricky...
It helps a lot if you have something like a bamboo stalk so you can entice it to go where you want.

When we're living in the garden, the cats are only out on leashes, so I have a bit of experience with that.
When we're not, the cat's don't get outdoors at all.

Gillianren
2009-Mar-23, 04:17 AM
I used to take D out on a leash. Some days, it works better than others.

Swift
2009-Mar-23, 01:28 PM
This probably says something about my evil brain, but when I first saw the thread title, I had a different interpreation of it.... you know, along with the free range chicken and the produce... :eek: :evil: :o

Buttercup
2009-Mar-24, 12:14 PM
This probably says something about my evil brain, but when I first saw the thread title, I had a different interpreation of it.... you know, along with the free range chicken and the produce... :eek: :evil: :o

:lol: Never fear...no dog meat for sale.

It is true the dogs I saw Saturday were generally very well behaved and seemed to enjoy the experience. But again, the aisles are cramped and they're a trip hazard. Besides the fact that animals can be unpredictable and each was well within "bite" range.

The vendors at the Market seem to also dislike this new development: Most displays contain long decorative tablecloths/spreads -- down to the concrete. Those linens probably have been "wetted." The vendors are not as friendly/easygoing as they once were.

The dog lovers at the Market can find someplace else to "meet and greet." :hand: They're treating it like a public park; well, it's not.

closetgeek
2009-Mar-24, 12:38 PM
What I've noticed about the few dogs at the local Farmers' Market here is how they seem to be on their very best behavior, as if it's a special treat they want to experience again the next week.

I've discovered that there is this loophole that people found, in order to bring their dogs where ever they want, even places where animals are typically forbidden. They need to change the laws a bit. It is illegal to refuse service to a disabled person who is dependent on a guide dog so they made it that only service animals are allowed in the 'no pets allowed' areas. There is a trainer near my old house who, for $1700.00, takes your dog for two weeks and trains him/her. Once the course is over and the dog passes, it is now a certified service dog, papaer work and all, and allowed anywhere a guide dog is allowed. Now, if I see someone who is obviously, visually impaired, using a guide dog, I have no issues; I will extend my tolerance because that is their means for independence. But, when I see a couple that have too much time on their hands, walking Pebbles amongst food, with a dog that is not required, I do get annoyed. To me, it's no different then using a sprained thumb to get a disabled tag on your car, just so you can park close to the store.

Euniculus
2009-Mar-24, 09:46 PM
I've discovered that there is this loophole that people found, in order to bring their dogs where ever they want, even places where animals are typically forbidden. They need to change the laws a bit. It is illegal to refuse service to a disabled person who is dependent on a guide dog so they made it that only service animals are allowed in the 'no pets allowed' areas. There is a trainer near my old house who, for $1700.00, takes your dog for two weeks and trains him/her. Once the course is over and the dog passes, it is now a certified service dog, papaer work and all, and allowed anywhere a guide dog is allowed. Now, if I see someone who is obviously, visually impaired, using a guide dog, I have no issues; I will extend my tolerance because that is their means for independence. But, when I see a couple that have too much time on their hands, walking Pebbles amongst food, with a dog that is not required, I do get annoyed. To me, it's no different then using a sprained thumb to get a disabled tag on your car, just so you can park close to the store.

While I'm not a fan of dogs in public places, let's not forget there are service animals that perform other genuine functions.

Seizure alert dogs

Dogs for the hearing impaired (trained to detect sounds and alert owner)

Seeing eye mini horses :confused:

Dogs that assist wheelchair bound individuals

HenrikOlsen
2009-Mar-25, 02:54 AM
And noone's been complaining about those, only about people who get their dog trained as one without an actual need so they can take it places.

Euniculus
2009-Mar-25, 02:58 AM
And noone's been complaining about those, only about people who get their dog trained as one without an actual need so they can take it places.

I know. :)

Just pointing out some less noticable service animals.

Studioguy
2009-Mar-25, 04:19 AM
ETA: Oh, yeah. My alma mater has a pretty firm leash policy. Dogs must be on leashes at all times. So there are people, a pretty scary amount of them, who will put a leash on the dog and let the dog wander around, dragging the leash.

The stipulation for having a dog on a leash is that you be in control of him (or her). I had my Great Dane out for a walk (back when she was still with us :cry:) and she was very well behaved, on a leash. A Shar Pei on a leash, without a human on the other end, came running up barking. Well, my normally mild mannered Dane didn't take kindly to it and in about 122ms, the Shar Pei was scurrying away with a 5" laceration on its head. I felt terrible for the dog, but felt even worse when the owner sued me for vet bills.

The small claims judge asked one question to each of us: Were you in control of your dog?

We both said we were. I pointed out that she wasn't within sight when it happened and didn't make an appearance until she heard her dog yelping. She obviously wasn't holding her dog's leash or in control of it. She admitted that was the case but started ranting about how my dog was vicious and blah blah blah.

The judge dismissed the case.

It's all about being in control of your dog and not letting it hurt or harass people or other dogs.

/sidestory

novaderrik
2009-Mar-25, 04:48 AM
the Farmer's Market in the OP sounds more like what used to be called a "flea market"- people selling their junk to others in a public place.
but "Flea Market" doesn't sounds as important or quaint as "Farmer's Market"..
as for the "service animal" requirement for taking dogs to public places- all the owner would have say is that little FiFi is there for "emotional support".. because, as we all know, everyone needs their emotions to be totally supported and to feel loved at all times otherwise they will die...

Josh
2009-Mar-25, 06:27 AM
Pets aren't children. I wish some people would get that through their heads.

Agreed. They're better :p. I like dogs and animals. I pretty much get along with animals a whole lot better than most people.

I wouldn't mind dogs going in any place I was. You have less chance of catching anything from a dog than you do both other humans and cats. So I don't see why they're a health risk.

It comes down to being a responsible owner and as Studioguy said, being in control (same should go for children, neh?). Taking an aggressive dog anywhere it can have a fight is dumb. Taking a flea infested dog anywhere is dumb too and you probably shouldn't be owning a dog if it is flea infested.

Dogs are people too.

Paracelsus
2009-Mar-25, 06:53 AM
Agreed. They're better :p. I like dogs and animals. I pretty much get along with animals a whole lot better than most people.

I wouldn't mind dogs going in any place I was. You have less chance of catching anything from a dog than you do both other humans and cats. So I don't see why they're a health risk.

It comes down to being a responsible owner and as Studioguy said, being in control (same should go for children, neh?). Taking an aggressive dog anywhere it can have a fight is dumb. Taking a flea infested dog anywhere is dumb too and you probably shouldn't be owning a dog if it is flea infested.

Dogs are people too.

:clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap:

As the proud adoptive mom of a retired grey, I couldn't agree more. My J is sweet, polite, clean, and quiet. That's more than I can say for some people's children.

Aggressive dogs should be kept out of public spaces--that much is a given. It is also a given that all dogs in public spaces should be on leashes, unless one is in a dog park. If those two stipulations are met, I don't understand why anyone would have a problem with dogs being anywhere that people are.

Gillianren
2009-Mar-25, 06:56 AM
the Farmer's Market in the OP sounds more like what used to be called a "flea market"- people selling their junk to others in a public place.

It doesn't at all to me. What Buttercup describes sounds a great deal like my own local Farmers' Market, which also has handmade jewelry and so forth, but all well-made stuff, not junk. However, there are also booths for three local bakeries, several local orchards, a couple of local butchers, the guy who sells emu oil, and so forth. Flea markets are still called flea markets; there's one out at the drive-in theatre in Shelton summer weekends. A Farmers' Market is strictly geared toward local production and growers.

ETA--What do I have against dogs being in various places? Well, we'll start with the simple I don't like dogs. Not good enough? Okay. How about the fact that not all dog owners are responsible when it comes to cleaning up after their pets? Not all dog owners are responsible about keeping their dogs from "showing affection" to people who don't like them. Don't get me wrong. I don't want people bringing their birds everywhere, or their cats, or their ferrets. (Oh, get me started on ferrets.) But leave your dog at home; there are some places where they don't belong.

geonuc
2009-Mar-25, 08:36 AM
the Farmer's Market in the OP sounds more like what used to be called a "flea market"- people selling their junk to others in a public place.
but "Flea Market" doesn't sounds as important or quaint as "Farmer's Market"..
as for the "service animal" requirement for taking dogs to public places- all the owner would have say is that little FiFi is there for "emotional support".. because, as we all know, everyone needs their emotions to be totally supported and to feel loved at all times otherwise they will die...
I'll echo Gillianren's comment about farmer's markets. Not flea markets at all.

As to the second, I think you're treading close to gross insensitivity to people who actually need these animals to help overcome a disability.

Buttercup
2009-Mar-25, 12:13 PM
It doesn't at all to me. What Buttercup describes sounds a great deal like my own local Farmers' Market, which also has handmade jewelry and so forth, but all well-made stuff, not junk. However, there are also booths for three local bakeries, several local orchards, a couple of local butchers, the guy who sells emu oil, and so forth. Flea markets are still called flea markets; there's one out at the drive-in theatre in Shelton summer weekends. A Farmers' Market is strictly geared toward local production and growers.

Yes. Besides the high-quality art and leather goods there's also plenty of oils, fresh produce (lots of it -- tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, hot peppers, etc., all locally grown), baked items (cakes, breads, empanadas) and a Thai couple who sell home-baked European style sweets and hand-made spring rolls.


Novaderrik - all the owner would have say is that little FiFi is there for "emotional support".. because, as we all know, everyone needs their emotions to be totally supported and to feel loved at all times otherwise they will die...

Isn't that the truth. :rolleyes: I'm often amazed at how codependent and "fragile" some people are. One little impact on their tiny comfort zone and they're falling to pieces...

geonuc
2009-Mar-25, 12:21 PM
I'm often amazed at how codependent and "fragile" some people are. One little impact on their tiny comfort zone and they're falling to pieces...
Quit talking about me.

Buttercup
2009-Mar-25, 12:49 PM
:p

Josh
2009-Mar-25, 01:14 PM
But leave your dog at home; there are some places where they don't belong.

Not in France there's not. One of the cultural capitals of the world and they take their dogs everywhere. Works pretty well for them.

Studioguy
2009-Mar-25, 01:17 PM
I should also add that I absolutely love dogs. They're some of the nicest people I've ever met.

I like cats, too...served with duck sauce. ;)

(obviously kidding)

Argos
2009-Mar-25, 01:53 PM
I like dogs better than children. If a place ainīt no dogīs place, then itīs no place for me.

[I like cats too]

Buttercup
2009-Mar-25, 02:39 PM
[I like cats too]

Argos, bless your heart! :D

Gillianren
2009-Mar-25, 05:07 PM
I like dogs better than children. If a place ainīt no dogīs place, then itīs no place for me.

Then you're never coming over here.

I don't care what France does. They also treat their workers a lot better than we do, but people don't tend to cite that. The fact is, dogs can be a nuisance. Oh, children can be, too, but as soon as we need dogs for continuation of the species, let me know. At least proper service animals are always well-trained.

Argos
2009-Mar-25, 05:50 PM
then you're never coming over here.

I don't care what france does. They also treat their workers a lot better than we do, but people don't tend to cite that. The fact is, dogs can be a nuisance. Oh, children can be, too, but as soon as we need dogs for continuation of the species, let me know. At least proper service animals are always well-trained.

:) ;)

Tucson_Tim
2009-Mar-25, 05:58 PM
Dog people annoy me. They're always trying to sniff me in embarrassing places or ride my leg.

Studioguy
2009-Mar-25, 06:27 PM
If one of them lays into you, it's best to just let 'em finish.

Tucson_Tim
2009-Mar-25, 06:29 PM
If one of them lays into you, it's best to just let 'em finish.

Christmas Vacation, I believe. That was Snots.

Studioguy
2009-Mar-25, 07:15 PM
Yep. Snot's got a little bit os Mississippi leg-hound in him.

speedfreek
2009-Mar-25, 07:35 PM
I hate it when I'm out with my dog in the park and there are people there who have no control over their children. Suddenly I'm surrounded by dirty fingered kids (usually with mucous visibly running from their noses) and they all want to contaminate my dog with their germs as they seem attracted to her for some strange reason.

Children should definitely be kept on a leash when out in public - and there are lots of cases of older children attacking people, usually trying to steal stuff. The older ones seem to travel around in packs intended to intimidate.

Argos
2009-Mar-25, 08:12 PM
i hate it when i'm out with my dog in the park and there are people there who have no control over their children. Suddenly i'm surrounded by dirty fingered kids (usually with mucous visibly running from their noses) and they all want to contaminate my dog with their germs as they seem attracted to her for some strange reason.

:lol:

novaderrik
2009-Mar-25, 08:24 PM
It doesn't at all to me. What Buttercup describes sounds a great deal like my own local Farmers' Market, which also has handmade jewelry and so forth, but all well-made stuff, not junk. However, there are also booths for three local bakeries, several local orchards, a couple of local butchers, the guy who sells emu oil, and so forth. Flea markets are still called flea markets; there's one out at the drive-in theatre in Shelton summer weekends. A Farmers' Market is strictly geared toward local production and growers.

ETA--What do I have against dogs being in various places? Well, we'll start with the simple I don't like dogs. Not good enough? Okay. How about the fact that not all dog owners are responsible when it comes to cleaning up after their pets? Not all dog owners are responsible about keeping their dogs from "showing affection" to people who don't like them. Don't get me wrong. I don't want people bringing their birds everywhere, or their cats, or their ferrets. (Oh, get me started on ferrets.) But leave your dog at home; there are some places where they don't belong.
i've been to a couple of "Farmer's Markets", and the only difference i've seen is the quality of the junk and the people that go to them. the people that go to flea markets are just normal people from the lower and middle classes, and the people that go to the farmer's markets are just normal people from the middle and upper classes. i know of a few farmer's markets that used to be called flea markets until they realized that they can get people with more expendable income to show up from greater distances if they change the name on the sign.
that being said, i've never been to a farmer's market in a big city- partly becasue i hate big cities, partly becasue i hate the whole concept, and partly becasue i don't mingle well with the more upscale types of people that inhabit that type of area.

geonuc
2009-Mar-25, 08:28 PM
Well, I still think you are mistaken by the terms, despite your experiences. Certainly, what you describe as a flea market is not what Buttercup was talking about.

Here's (http://www.morningsidemarket.com/) the website of the one I go to.

Buttercup
2009-Mar-25, 08:43 PM
Thanks geonuc. :)

Novaderrik, you're going off topic.

Not that I mind so much, I did answer you and explain...but we're not discussing what constitutes a flea market vs. a farmer's market. :rolleyes:

Tucson_Tim
2009-Mar-25, 08:49 PM
We should make up a new internet forum law, something to encompass this behavior, of which we are all guilty:

Only the thread starter and the moderators care about threads going off topic. And most of the time the moderators don't care either.


A corollary:

The thread starter who complains about OT posts will, within an hour or so, make an OT post in someone else's thread.

novaderrik
2009-Mar-25, 10:38 PM
Thanks geonuc. :)

Novaderrik, you're going off topic.

Not that I mind so much, I did answer you and explain...but we're not discussing what constitutes a flea market vs. a farmer's market. :rolleyes:
one difference is that i've never seen a dog at a flea market..

closetgeek
2009-Mar-25, 10:48 PM
I know. :)

Just pointing out some less noticable service animals.

You are right, I am quick to judge. I assume that just because a person isn't blind, they might not need canine assistance.

Tucson_Tim
2009-Mar-25, 10:51 PM
one difference is that i've never seen a dog at a flea market..

Of course not. They don't want to get fleas.