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tusenfem
2003-Dec-10, 02:32 PM
Hi there!
This is for all the german speaking (reading) people on this list. I just bought the new GEO special, about our beloved moon.
But there it is, right in the first article, the tides are explained and ... well if you read the Bad Astronomy book you can probably guess what kind of picture there was. The tidal bulges of the oceans were nicely in line with the Sun-Earth-Moon line. I guess there is still a long way to go before this misconception is kicked out of the literature.
And something totally unrelated, I just bought a Galileo Thermometer and I just love watching it :P
Greetings from Graz

crazy4space
2003-Dec-10, 05:52 PM
Wie Gehts - The BA does a real good job of explaining the tides in his book its probably the most comprehensive I have ever read. My Galileo thermometer sits in my office so I get to watch it every day. Keep looking up. :)

Diamond
2003-Dec-11, 11:18 AM
Wie Gehts - The BA does a real good job of explaining the tides in his book its probably the most comprehensive I have ever read. My Galileo thermometer sits in my office so I get to watch it every day. Keep looking up. :)

My, what an exciting life you lead...how do you stand the pace? :roll:

tusenfem
2003-Dec-11, 12:20 PM
Watching the Galileo themometer is like zen meditation. Don't think, just see if one of the balls will go up or down. Then after a while you have the right idea in your head to solve that nasty problem with the Earth's magnetotail and the Cluster spacecraft data. :o

Diamond
2003-Dec-11, 12:51 PM
Watching the Galileo themometer is like zen meditation. Don't think, just see if one of the balls will go up or down. Then after a while you have the right idea in your head to solve that nasty problem with the Earth's magnetotail and the Cluster spacecraft data. :o

This is about watching balls isn't it? 8-[

kilopi
2003-Dec-12, 04:48 AM
The tidal bulges of the oceans were nicely in line with the Sun-Earth-Moon line. I guess there is still a long way to go before this misconception is kicked out of the literature.

What is the misconception?

tusenfem
2003-Dec-12, 09:49 AM
What is the misconception?

According the The Book the tidal bulges in the ocean are 30(?) degrees rotated past the line connecting Sun-Earth-Moon, in the case of spring tide.

Eroica
2003-Dec-12, 11:49 AM
According the The Book the tidal bulges in the ocean are 30(?) degrees rotated past the line connecting Sun-Earth-Moon, in the case of spring tide.
I'm sure that diagram has been deliberately exaggerated for clarity. Surely the angle is actually tiny? Does anyone know the exact value?

kilopi
2003-Dec-12, 12:09 PM
What is the misconception?

According the The Book the tidal bulges in the ocean are 30(?) degrees rotated past the line connecting Sun-Earth-Moon, in the case of spring tide.
I just looked through my copy of the BA's book, and I couldn't find that. Do you have a page number?

kilopi
2003-Dec-12, 12:24 PM
I'm sure that diagram has been deliberately exaggerated for clarity. Surely the angle is actually tiny? Does anyone know the exact value?
If you are talking about the diagram on page 73, that angle is more like 45 degrees. The actual angle is about 3 degrees, according to Physics of the Earth, by Stacey (p.122)