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dvb
2003-Dec-20, 07:18 AM
I'm curious to know who'd be interested in getting frozen so that they could some day wake up in the future and be facinated by all the advances in technology and space travel.

Wouldn't it be fun? :D

Let me know your opinions!

I for 1 would jump at the chance if I was on my deathbed.

Humphrey
2003-Dec-20, 07:22 AM
Problem is it won't work.

When your cells freeze, the expanding ice inside them litterally tears apart the cellular membrane. Even if they thaw you, moanyk, if not all of your cells will be dead and ripped apart. Not a good thing. .

dvb
2003-Dec-20, 07:27 AM
Ahh you're correct. But some scientists in nanotechnology believe that they'll 1 day be able to repair the cellular damage. We haven't come that far yet, but they believe in another 20 years or so, the technology will have evolved to this state.

gethen
2003-Dec-20, 02:13 PM
Didn't vote for any of the choices. When it's time to go, I plan to just go. Whatever happens to the body later is not a big concern. I won't be needing it. :wink:

Mr. X
2003-Dec-20, 02:56 PM
Very very very near death, I would probably do it.

I'm one of those cling to life however you can in the last minute like you're really really desperate types. Anything that remotely increases my probabilities to walk the earth again no matter how far fetched is always welcome, at least more than death in my book.

Besides having:

19XX - 20XX
22XX - 26XX
31XX - ?

On your tombstone is priceless. :D
Or how about rising from your bed and saying: "I live... again!"

Like so much things biological, the snag we hit now will most likely be circumvented in the far future, even the one related to freezing.

Normandy6644
2003-Dec-20, 04:36 PM
Nice Army of Darkness reference Mr. X. :lol:

What I don't understand is the people who only freeze their heads. What good is that?!?!? I know the idea is that they will put your head on someone else's body, but when it comes down to it, is that really living your own life anymore, or just borrowing?

Mr. X
2003-Dec-20, 05:54 PM
Normandy6644:

Thanks!

They consider that what they "are" is their brain. The rest is just baggage. So if they could just ditch your withered old body, take some poor sap's youthful body, ditch his brain and put yours in it you'd be happier like this.

I can't say I disagree. There's something tempting about having my head moved around from body to body every 50 years or so. :)

Sever
2003-Dec-20, 07:04 PM
But what if the world ended while you were in stasis?

dvb
2003-Dec-20, 09:08 PM
That's the chance you take. The world could end tomorrow, and we wouldn't be able to do anything about it.

Life is a gamble, and if no one ever took risks, then we wouldn't be where we are today. :)


What I don't understand is the people who only freeze their heads. What good is that?!?!? I know the idea is that they will put your head on someone else's body, but when it comes down to it, is that really living your own life anymore, or just borrowing?

I've heard people say that the mind and body are 1. In other words every living cell in our body retains memory and is a part of us. If we stuck our head on someone elses body, we might begin to have memories that the previous posessor of that body had. I know it all sounds crazy, but they had some doctor on Opera once that was talking about people having memory relapses of things that never happened to them, but happened to people that they received organ transplants from.

All really freaky stuff! Just freeze my body thanks. :D

Normandy6644
2003-Dec-20, 10:59 PM
Wow that is pretty crazy. I still find something creepy about my head sitting in the freezer. I'm gone when I'm gone!

pteranodon
2003-Dec-20, 11:27 PM
I don't have any expertise in this field but how would they avoid DNA and protein degradation caused by oxygen? :-k

Chuck
2003-Dec-21, 02:22 AM
They'd keep you in a tank of liquid nitrogen so you wouldn't decay. Freezing just the head is cheaper. In the future they can take a DNA sample from your head and grow you a new body from it.

It seems unlikely to work but if it doesn't then you just stay dead. Since you're dead already you have nothing to lose.

What it really does is make the dying feel better by giving them some hope of recovery.

Mr. X
2003-Dec-21, 05:54 AM
A what-if kind of situation. It can't get much worse than it is at that point, huh? :D

TinFoilHat
2003-Dec-21, 10:23 PM
Cryogenic freezing is an expensive scam. Nobody frozen today is going to be revived, barring utterly magic technology.

I plan on being cremated. That way, I won't be resurrected until nanotechnology has advanced enough to reconstruct me from a handful of ashes. I see this as being only slightly harder than reviving a dead body which has had every cell ruptured and every synapse seperated.

pteranodon
2003-Dec-22, 01:13 PM
Cryogenic freezing is an expensive scam. Nobody frozen today is going to be revived, barring utterly magic technology.

I plan on being cremated. That way, I won't be resurrected until nanotechnology has advanced enough to reconstruct me from a handful of ashes. I see this as being only slightly harder than reviving a dead body which has had every cell ruptured and every synapse seperated.

=D> I second that.

Ikyoto
2003-Dec-22, 01:50 PM
Cremation is the way I'm going as well. Freezing to "cheat" death is an action of pure fear and (IMO) selfishness.

Why fear what you do not know. If there is something after death, and you've lived as well as you can, what is there to fear. If there is nothing after death, why worry?

Selfishness? Yup. The resources needed to preserve a body or even a head are pretty substantial, to say nothing of the population problems we are already facing.

Cremate my carcass, mix the ashes in with cement and pour it into a mold for a bench... Then donate me to a school for wayward girls!

Sigma_Orionis
2003-Dec-22, 04:03 PM
I remember in the 70s and early 80s there were all sorts of rumors of celebrities being frozen when they were near death,Walt Disney and Aristotle Onassis among others. Of course none of this was true. Since it was always mentioned as rumors do "services" like this actually exist? Does somebody actually offer you to freeze you when you are about to die?

Chuck
2003-Dec-22, 04:10 PM
http://www.alcor.org

pteranodon
2003-Dec-22, 04:21 PM
They'd keep you in a tank of liquid nitrogen so you wouldn't decay. Freezing just the head is cheaper. In the future they can take a DNA sample from your head and grow you a new body from it.

It seems unlikely to work but if it doesn't then you just stay dead. Since you're dead already you have nothing to lose.

What it really does is make the dying feel better by giving them some hope of recovery.

Well, in tis case I think oxygen will get dissolved in the fluid anyway, just retarding the decay process.

banquo's_bumble_puppy
2003-Dec-22, 04:23 PM
Freeze me now. Maybe my life will be better in the year 3000. Planet Xpress here I come.... :o :o :o

Sigma_Orionis
2003-Dec-22, 06:50 PM
http://www.alcor.org

I am almost sorry I asked, thanks for the info! :)

dvb
2003-Dec-22, 07:04 PM
I don't think that my wanting to be frozen is out of cheating death or selfishness. I want to know what the world will be like in 100-200 years from now. Provided we don't blow ourselves up that is. ;)

Who knows what's to come.

Maybe we'll have colonized mars, and space travel could become mainstream.

I'm an optimistic person, so I tend to look at the bright side of things. :)

mike alexander
2003-Dec-23, 12:13 AM
Me? No.

The idea of magical nanotechnology to fix all the freezing damage is rather simpleminded, anyhow. The smarter way would be to find a way to solidify the carcass as a glass to avoid the ice damage in the first place. And I would use liquid helium. Colder the better.

Another problem is that it takes a finite time to freeze and thaw, and the likelyhood of doing it fast enough and uniformly enough seems vanishingly small.

On the other hand, some insects and amphibians can freeze solid and then recover. A mammalian brain strikes me as unlikely to survive such a process under any circumstances.

rv
2003-Dec-23, 06:37 PM
I don't see the need to be frozen...then again I believe in reincarnation.....However, I chose that I would live forever even though I don't want to. Just think about it, wouldn't you get a tad bit bored by this mundane life over the next few hundred years. Whenever I have to go, I will gladly do so. :D

pteranodon
2003-Dec-23, 06:52 PM
I don't see the need to be frozen...then again I believe in reincarnation.....However, I chose that I would live forever even though I don't want to. Just think about it, wouldn't you get a tad bit bored by this mundane life over the next few hundred years. Whenever I have to go, I will gladly do so. :D =D> =D> =D> =D>
(I believe in reincarnation too)

jkmccrann
2005-Nov-08, 01:27 PM
Cryogenic freezing is an expensive scam. Nobody frozen today is going to be revived, barring utterly magic technology.

I plan on being cremated. That way, I won't be resurrected until nanotechnology has advanced enough to reconstruct me from a handful of ashes. I see this as being only slightly harder than reviving a dead body which has had every cell ruptured and every synapse seperated.

You just never know TinFoil! ;)

In any case, I think living forever is waaay overated, although, if it came with a fountain of youth, maybe........hmmmmmmmmmmmm

Heid the Ba'
2005-Nov-08, 06:28 PM
No. Life is a tiny sliver of light between two eternities of darkness. I can cope with that.

SolusLupus
2005-Nov-08, 06:32 PM
I'm for living for eternity. For selfish reasons, so I can experience as much as possible out of life, and enjoy as much as possible out of life -- to be able to do all that I could possibly do and want to do. Selflessly, so I can provide a benefit for other pepole through my personal experience throughout my life.

I don't understand why people assume that you must be afraid of death to desire an eternity of life. I'm not afraid of death. Everyone else dies, why shouldn't I?

However, I also think that there is an end positive result for immortality, and that one day technology will allow immortality to not only become a reality, but also to have the resources and technology to support such life (to prevent the problems of overpopulation).

As for Cryogenics... eh. Maybe it'll work someday, maybe it won't. C'est la vie, really. However, when I die (since it's very unlikely I will ever get to experience the grace of immortality), I hope to be cremated and have my ashes spread across the world. Much better than "taking up space" in graveyards. (Ugh, I hate graveyards - so much space taken up by matter that has no use!)

farmerjumperdon
2005-Nov-08, 07:35 PM
Absolutely not. Turnover is the natural order of things. When your turn is up, be a good citizen and exit gracefully. I think most people come to accept it by the time their physical being is about to expire. None of my grandparents were fighting death at the end - they went with dignity and were fine that they had lived their life and it was time to move on. I'd guess all of the currently frozen people were mentally unstable (or at least egotistical to an extreme) to some degree and could not come to terms with the natural end to their life.

SolusLupus
2005-Nov-08, 08:50 PM
I'd guess all of the currently frozen people were mentally unstable (or at least egotistical to an extreme) to some degree and could not come to terms with the natural end to their life.

And I could say that you're mentally unstable for accepting death. Immediately assuming someone's mentally unstable because they happen to disagree with you, your grandparents, or whatever, is insulting and rather Ad Hominem.

I like to think that I'm not mentally unstable, and I support the idea of immortality. However, considering that you seem to have made up your judgement ("If they disagree with me, they're mentally unstable"), there's no way I can say anything without you merely pinning that label onto me.

Also, there's the fact that you can't really argue with them. So, because you can't discuss their viewpoints, you immediately assume the worst (that they're mentally unstable or egotistical to the extreme). I wouldn't want someone doing that to me -- assuming the worst of my motivations and/or mental processes merely because someone isn't able to discuss with me my motivations.

I think you can guess why that would annoy me.

farmerjumperdon
2005-Nov-08, 09:17 PM
And I could say that you're mentally unstable for accepting death. Immediately assuming someone's mentally unstable because they happen to disagree with you, your grandparents, or whatever, is insulting and rather Ad Hominem.

I like to think that I'm not mentally unstable, and I support the idea of immortality. However, considering that you seem to have made up your judgement ("If they disagree with me, they're mentally unstable"), there's no way I can say anything without you merely pinning that label onto me.

Also, there's the fact that you can't really argue with them. So, because you can't discuss their viewpoints, you immediately assume the worst (that they're mentally unstable or egotistical to the extreme). I wouldn't want someone doing that to me -- assuming the worst of my motivations and/or mental processes merely because someone isn't able to discuss with me my motivations.

I think you can guess why that would annoy me.

Nothing ad hominen about it. It's natures way, all living things die. An inability to accept that is either lack of wisdom or instability of some sorts. The world doesn't hold static for anyone anywhere. To want to be immortal is like desiring to insert yourself into a childs daydream of foreverness. I can understand wanting to live a full life, to a ripe old age; but to wish for immortality is so far out there as to be ludicrous. Kind of like when a little kid stratches out their arms as far as they can go and says something is soooooooo big. They think they have just described the biggest size something can be, but have really no idea of the context. Same with someone who wishes for immortality. They have no idea what they are wishing. Also like poor people who claim to know what they would do if they won the lottery. Talking out of their heads because they have no idea what it is like to have money, and therefore no real idea what they are talking about. To claim to want immortality is to want something you can't know about. Like dividing by zero. Not definable. Not attacking you, just making a perfectly objective observation about people desiring something that doesn't exist and a guess at why they do so.

SolusLupus
2005-Nov-08, 09:32 PM
An inability to accept that is either lack of wisdom or instability of some sorts.

If I have such a lack of wisdom or instability, why are you even bothering to reply to me? It's obvious what you think already. That IS an Ad Hominem attack -- immediately replying to an idea or argument by proclaiming that anyone with that idea has to be insane to have it in the first place.

I, sir, consider myself wise, and of sound mind. Yet I disagree with you, especially on your assumption that anyone who desires immortality is not of sound mind. You use a few anecdotes of, "My grandparents were perfectly okay with it when they died!" in order to justify an attack on other's mindsets, over a broad category ("People that go into cryogenics"), without ever having heard their individual arguments or ideas. That is Ad Hominem.

Also, my grandfather died of cancer. You want to know how he died? In extreme pain and suffering. Yet the lung cancer he got from smoking was just as natural as aging or dying in the first place.



It's natures way, all living things die.

Also, it's natural for almost all animals to not want to die -- survival is the main drive behind evolution and... well... living.

Death is natural, yes. Technically, so is disease. So are certain kinds of poisons. So is aging. So is cancer. So is starving to death when you don't have enough nutrition. So is suffering when your leg breaks. "Natural" does not always mean "desirable".


To claim to want immortality is to want something you can't know about. Like dividing by zero. Not definable.

It's true that it's almost impossible to be truly immortal. You'd have to live to the end of forever to truly say, "I have lived forever". However, I believe in living for as long as quantitively possible, prefereably in a state where that life is A) Productive, and B) Not suffering. That's what I mean when I say I wouldn't mind being immortal.


Talking out of their heads because they have no idea what it is like to have money, and therefore no real idea what they are talking about. To claim to want immortality is to want something you can't know about.

A lot of people go in to get a college education to pursue a career that they're interested in spending a lot of their life in. Some of them end up regretting their career choice. Some don't. However, the mAJORITY of people that wish to go into this career don't know every nook and cranny of that career -- they run into things, obstacles and benefits -- that they were not expecting when they were first getting involved in this career. Also, you might end up having to work with people you never expected to work with; you might have to deal with things that are annoying; you might end up with a boss that's a racist; you might have to deal with a sudden layoff because of a drop in economy. Life is about the unknown, the undefinable. You can define a job or a career - just like you can define immortality -- but that doesn't mean you can expect or know all about it without fully immersing yourself into it.

Applied to Immortality, there are benefits and downfalls that come with immortality -- some of it can be predicted, some of it can't be until you actually go through it yourself. A lot of it also has to do with chance, just like with any career. You might end up unhappy or you might end up having fun throughout periods.

Why does this suddenly mean that desiring to be immortal is unsound of mind? So if you go into college with a job in mind, you're also unsound of mind?

Van Rijn
2005-Nov-08, 09:37 PM
Nothing ad hominen about it.


No, you just say anyone who would consider possibly extending their life is mentally unstable.



It's natures way, all living things die. An inability to accept that is either lack of wisdom or instability of some sorts.


All things die, eventually. But we've been interfering with "nature's way" for a long time. Should we give up antibiotics, vaccines, modern medicine? Should we give up sanitation? Should we give up agriculture - after all, it is all very "unnatural."



The world doesn't hold static for anyone anywhere. To want to be immortal is like desiring to insert yourself into a childs daydream of foreverness. I can understand wanting to live a full life, to a ripe old age; but to wish for immortality is so far out there as to be ludicrous.


I don't want to be immortal. I don't think it is possible. I only want to live to a ripe old age - 400 to 500 years would be good enough for me. There are still a lot of things I want to do, and 70-80 years or so just aren't enough.
What I don't understand is people who want to end cancer (which is primarily a disease of aging) but seem to think there is something wrong with directly attempting to slow aging. Why should we accept bodies that slowly fall apart when we probably can do something about it?



Not attacking you, just making a perfectly objective observation about people desiring something that doesn't exist and a guess at why they do so.

"Objective"? This is all about your beliefs. They are completely unobjective.

SolusLupus
2005-Nov-08, 09:43 PM
I think Van Rijn said all that I tried to say in a much shorter and easily understood way. Thanks.

farmerjumperdon
2005-Nov-09, 07:48 PM
OK, maybe a little strong on my words. What I was trying to get at is probably the motivation for not wanting to die. (Strictly opinion, but I do not think animals other than humans are capable of contemplating it, and therefore do not desire to die, . . . or live). Not wanting to ever die seems to me to be a totallly irrational desire. It does not fit in well with reality. What would happen to our world if nobody ever died? So OK, mental instability was a bit strong. I'll downgrade it to lack of perfect reason. I still do not see it as an attack. If I said you personally are crazy, nuts, or certifiably mad - that would be different. My saying it is an irrational desire, and that people who have irrational desires are (insert a word you're OK with here), is no different than criticizing any other irrational fear or desire; such as people who shriek and jump on the table at the sight of a 1 ounce mouse, or people who desire to keep slaves in the 21st century, or people afraid of the number 13, or Presidents who want to make policy based on astrology, etc. Everybody has their thing (again, insert acceptable word here - I'd use adjustment issue(s)), nobody I know is always capable of perfectly rationale thought. I just call it what it is when it surfaces as irrational thoughts or behavior. Thinking it would be OK for people to live forever seems to me to be grounded in some sort of irrational fear or desire; examples of which we all have and display from time to time. I do not think you are any more tilted than the average human. (That is meant tongue in cheek).

SolusLupus
2005-Nov-10, 12:15 AM
I'll downgrade it to lack of perfect reason.

So you have perfect reason and I don't, then.


I still do not see it as an attack. If I said you personally are crazy, nuts, or certifiably mad - that would be different.

So it's okay to say that EVERYONE that desires immortality is crazy, nuts, or certifiably mad, as long as you don't single me out specifically? So what if I said all Jews had a stupid belief and are idiotic for it, but then said, "Why do you see that as an attack?" to a rabbi? That's not logical.


My saying it is an irrational desire, and that people who have irrational desires are (insert a word you're OK with here), is no different than criticizing any other irrational fear or desire; such as people who shriek and jump on the table at the sight of a 1 ounce mouse, or people who desire to keep slaves in the 21st century, or people afraid of the number 13, or Presidents who want to make policy based on astrology, etc. Everybody has their thing (again, insert acceptable word here - I'd use adjustment issue(s)), nobody I know is always capable of perfectly rationale thought.

Not all people that wish for immortality are merely afraid of death. Some of them see a use for it.

Also, who says it's necessarily irrational? If I had cancer, I'd be afraid -- is that irrational? Fear of death is necessary for survival. It's how we lived for this long.


. Everybody has their thing (again, insert acceptable word here - I'd use adjustment issue(s)), nobody I know is always capable of perfectly rationale thought.

How do you know I'm the one with rational thought, and you're just the insane man making his ramblings? Or do you just have faith? ;)

I'm secure in my own decisions, thank you very much.


Thinking it would be OK for people to live forever seems to me to be grounded in some sort of irrational fear or desire; examples of which we all have and display from time to time. I do not think you are any more tilted than the average human. (That is meant tongue in cheek).

My personal opinion is that immortality would be better suited when we have the resources and space to support it. But I'm an arrogant person, myself -- I like to think of myself as very rational, able to make good judgements, and able to change my judgements when I discover they are bad.

I do not think that fear of death is irrational at all, but then, I'm not for immortality merely to escape death. I'm in for it for how it can be used -- as a tool. A tool to be able to use wisdom, experience, knowledge, and time to your advantage, instead of only having a few decades to do anything in this world.

Humans are already living longer and longer. It won't be long (maybe a few centuries) before humans can be graced with the ability to live a few centuries thanks to futuristic medicine.

I won't be alive to see it, but I would hardly call the desire to live longer, eventually getting to the scope of many millions of years, irrational.

Not only that, but I DO consider it irrational to judge a large category of people just based on them wanting immortality. You have made many assumptions and judgements, Jumperdon.

Van Rijn
2005-Nov-10, 12:57 AM
farmer, what do you think of all the members of major religions that believe they will effectively live forever? Are they all irrational?

farmerjumperdon
2005-Nov-10, 08:55 PM
farmer, what do you think of all the members of major religions that believe they will effectively live forever? Are they all irrational?

If they are adults that literally think they will live forever, absolutely. But remember, I've downgraded from judging the people (sorry I did that) to judging the behavior. So yes, if they think they will literally live forever, they are most definitely exhibiting irrational behavior.

If it is a euphemism for the fact that the physical matter of their body will be recycled and may someday end up part of another living creature, that's perfectly rational.

If it is that they will be spiritually reincarnated, or go to heaven or something like that; that's a matter of faith and outside the realm of being judged as rational or irrational.

In response to Lone Wolf:

Yes
No, I've changed it to exhibiting irrational behavior
See above
Me
No
Based on norms
No, none, never

and you are wwelcome.

SolusLupus
2005-Nov-10, 09:42 PM
I don't know which questions you're answering with which answers, farmerjumperdon, so I'll just roll my eyes and leave the discussion. I've made my viewpoint clear, and continue on being the irrational little being you claim I am.

LurchGS
2005-Nov-11, 06:09 AM
Absolutely not. Turnover is the natural order of things. When your turn is up, be a good citizen and exit gracefully. I think most people come to accept it by the time their physical being is about to expire. None of my grandparents were fighting death at the end - they went with dignity and were fine that they had lived their life and it was time to move on. I'd guess all of the currently frozen people were mentally unstable (or at least egotistical to an extreme) to some degree and could not come to terms with the natural end to their life.

I say bunkum! This is true, only so long as natural selection rules the roost. This is patently not the case with the human animal (any more). Humans now allow what in any other animal would be called a cull to breed. Mind you, I'm not trying to be harsh or unkind - but ... well, there it is.

I agree with Lonewulf. I wanna live forever - not because I'm overly afraid of dying (though I admit there are moments when I'm a little nervous). There is so much I want to see, so much I want to do... so many girls to get to know (don't tell my wife). At the very least, I want to live long enough that my capacity for long term memory is exceeded.

Ok, I mixed some flip answers in there, but in general, it's true.

On the down side, I don't think cryogenics is the way. From what I hear, quick freezing doesn't rupture the cells - the hazard is actually more on the thawing side.

------------------------

drat, I can't think of anything clever to say here

farmerjumperdon
2005-Nov-11, 03:52 PM
I don't know which questions you're answering with which answers, farmerjumperdon, so I'll just roll my eyes and leave the discussion. I've made my viewpoint clear, and continue on being the irrational little being you claim I am.

That was my intention. I don't want to point-counterpoint argue with you on a topic that is largely personal opinion. I respect your right to hold yours. Rattling off my answers without picking apart your sentences and quoting them was a way of saying "OK, we're done then."

Wingless2Fly
2006-Mar-13, 06:44 AM
Hello.. I've searched and searched throughout the internet in hopes that I might find others who are as interested in living in the distant future as I am. Hence, I found only this site....

I'm actually surprised to see how many responded negatively towards the first comment... as it was only a gesture requesting insight if you'd WANT to be frozen and awoken later, not if it is ACTUALLY POSSIBLE...

If as of THIS MOMENT, it were possible, I, myself would wait 6 more years until my 30th year, and be cryogenically frozen.. nothing interests me more than the future, and being as though I have no belief in religion, nor the malcontent of current human indiscretion.... (go figure, a chick born on Christmas day who's one of the biggest antichrists on the planet...)

I am more than eager to see what is to become of the human race... will its be like Demolition Man? Galactica? Time Machine? Planet of the Apes? Or just the simple Apocalyptic verse from the book of man?.....

If there's a Cryogenic list, PLEASE, point me in the right direction!!!!

Megz

mickal555
2006-Mar-13, 09:22 AM
Here's a list of:
"Cryogenentic Myths"
http://www.alcor.org/cryomyths.html

So... what's the go?

I do not want to die- ever.

And welcome to BAUT Wingless2Fly! :D

Halcyon Dayz
2006-Mar-13, 09:36 AM
Well, that's who we are.
If we see something shiny, we try to pick it apart.

Sometimes we can't get the pieces back together, though. ;)

HenrikOlsen
2006-Mar-13, 11:42 AM
I've read too much Niven to believe in that solution.
The chance you're reanimated piece by piece as you are put inside someone else is too high.

Apart from that, if I haven't lived through the years until then, there's no chance I could be a successful member of the society as it looks at the time.
See Spider Robinson's short stort about the timetraveller for that. The first one, about a ten year trip to the future.

Halcyon Dayz
2006-Mar-13, 12:03 PM
Or the 1999 South Park episode about the iceman from 1996.

Doodler
2006-Mar-13, 01:40 PM
I'm not about to let myself become a popsicle while the technology is this raw. There's some interesting research being done into hibernation techniques involving mammals that I might be interested in, but for me, I'll fight against the coming darkness with whatever technology comes down the line.

I'm less concerned about cheating death, than I am putting it off for a good long while.

Roy Batty
2006-Mar-13, 03:21 PM
The original poll left out the option of being bitten by Lestat :D
Btw I voted for more life... ;)

eugenek
2006-Mar-13, 03:52 PM
Not me. When it's my time I'm bound for Carousel.

Roy Batty
2006-Mar-13, 04:27 PM
Not me. When it's my time I'm bound for Carousel.:) Carousel! Carousel!