PDA

View Full Version : FYI: World's Fastest Camera



PraedSt
2009-Apr-29, 09:38 PM
I know very little about imaging, but this looked cool. Scientists at the University of California have made what the press are calling 'the World's Fastest Camera'. It's not commercial yet, so 'World' Fastest Imaging System' is probably a better description.

Wired Article (with small explanatory video) (http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/04/fastestcamera/)
Nature article (http://www.nature.com/news/2009/090429/full/news.2009.412.html)


It can take 6.1 million pictures in a single second, at a shutter speed of 440 trillionths of a second.
...
The technology is dubbed STEAM, short for serial time-encoded amplified microscopy. It illuminates objects with an infrared laser that cycles through a series of different wavelengths, one for each pixel on the sensor.
...
For now, STEAM can only produce images composed of just 3,000 pixels, a far cry from the multi-million-pixel cameras used by consumers. But Goda’s team intends to develop a multi-megapixel camera that can take 100 million pictures per second, with a frame rate of they’re hoping to up this to mega-multipixel mode competitive with standard digital camers, taking 100 million pictures per second, with a shutter speed of just one-trillionth of a second.

geonuc
2009-Apr-30, 11:17 AM
Wow. I want the point & shoot model when it comes out.

NEOWatcher
2009-Apr-30, 02:23 PM
The media may be calling this the fastest camera, but there may be some gotchas in that definition. Perhaps it has to do with volume and not speed. Or video vs stills.

Years ago, I read an article about a high speed camera, with an impressive picture of a light beam caught in "mid flight".

I think this is the article (http://www.popsci.com/scitech/article/2003-07/lights-camera-nanosecond-action):


High-speed movie cameras can shoot up to 20 million frames in the blink of an eye. The world is a mighty interesting place in ultimate slo-mo.


The fastest cine camera produced by Cordin today is unimaginably quick: One second of images taken with the 200-million-frames-per-second digital model would take 96 days to view if played back at standard movie speed.

Here's a lab with a slower model (http://clifton.mech.northwestern.edu/~espinosa/dil.html).

A high speed 8-CCD Cordin camera with up to 100 million frames per second is available for dynamic full field measurements

PraedSt
2009-Apr-30, 03:57 PM
Yeah those Cordin cameras are definitely faster. I liked the interesting history:

A movie camera cleared the final serious obstacle in the path to the atomic age.

STEAM's was apparently built with off-the-shelf- components, so perhaps it'll be the 'fastest retail camera' one day.

CJSF
2009-Apr-30, 04:33 PM
The media may be calling this the fastest camera, but there may be some gotchas in that definition. Perhaps it has to do with volume and not speed. Or video vs stills.

Years ago, I read an article about a high speed camera, with an impressive picture of a light beam caught in "mid flight".

I think this is the article (http://www.popsci.com/scitech/article/2003-07/lights-camera-nanosecond-action):



Here's a lab with a slower model (http://clifton.mech.northwestern.edu/~espinosa/dil.html).


I didn't see the picture of the light beam in that article... is it posted somewhere else?

CJSF

MessengerM104
2009-Apr-30, 07:01 PM
to see is to believe

can anyone list all the artificial seeing devices
(crude (or somewhat less crude))
that re-made our Weltbild ?

"notions (theories/conceptions) without *intuition* are blind" (says Kant)
and in the original german it's rather Anschauung
meaning (mental or otherwise) S E E I N G

((toallthosewhoseek))

NEOWatcher
2009-Apr-30, 07:05 PM
I didn't see the picture of the light beam in that article... is it posted somewhere else?
I saw it in the hardcopy, but the back issues are on google book search
July 2003 issue of popsci (http://books.google.com/books?id=OmXCDm-E6QIC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_summary_r&cad=0_0#PPA79,M1) on page 78.

HenrikOlsen
2009-May-06, 10:00 PM
That's seriously cool.

slang
2009-May-07, 10:34 PM
I would have guessed that the fastest camera is on board New Horizons. Granted, there is the "world's" qualifier, but does that indicate "on Earth" or "made on Earth"?

PraedSt
2009-May-07, 10:47 PM
I would have guessed that the fastest camera is on board New Horizons. Granted, there is the "world's" qualifier, but does that indicate "on Earth" or "made on Earth"?
Heh. An interesting twist. But hang on, aren't the Voyagers faster?

Ara Pacis
2009-May-08, 12:07 AM
Well, since we are going on tangents, wouldn't the fastest camera be a Camera Obscura since there is no refraction and, therefore, no slowing of light?

slang
2009-May-08, 06:40 AM
Heh. An interesting twist. But hang on, aren't the Voyagers faster?

Not yet (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voyager_1). :)


The current speed of New Horizons is greater than Voyager 1 but when New Horizons reaches the same distance from the sun as Voyager is now, its speed will be about 13 km/s compared to Voyager's 17 km/s

mugaliens
2009-May-11, 01:03 AM
Modern SLRs, designed for pictures, not video, are nevertheless capable of taking full-motion HD. That's 1080p, or 1920x1080 (2,073,600 pixels), at a frame rate of 30 fps, for a total of 62,208,000 pixels (62 Megapixels) a second.

That's quite a bit!

publiusr
2009-May-18, 06:59 PM
I seem to remember an old, old episode of NOVA where a nuclear explosion was captured as the casing started to deform. How fast have film cameras become. I would think in the realm of nuclear tests, or with anything to do with high energy physics, that a new super fast CCD might be vulnerable to whatever it images--what with artifacts, etc.

I have often wondered if anyone has filmed a single object with about every possible camera that has been made, so as to have a computer compare images. I wonder if say Ball lightning would look one way on an old camcorder, another way in a webcam, with a different look on film, etc.

Ara Pacis
2009-May-19, 01:17 PM
I seem to remember an old, old episode of NOVA where a nuclear explosion was captured as the casing started to deform. How fast have film cameras become. I would think in the realm of nuclear tests, or with anything to do with high energy physics, that a new super fast CCD might be vulnerable to whatever it images--what with artifacts, etc.I thought the earliest image of a nuclear explosion was with a fireball at about 100ft diameter. I recall the image because it had "spokes" that were actually the steel guy wires for the tower, which were being vaporized ahead of the fireball front.


I have often wondered if anyone has filmed a single object with about every possible camera that has been made, so as to have a computer compare images. I wonder if say Ball lightning would look one way on an old camcorder, another way in a webcam, with a different look on film, etc.They did that to debunk the "flying rods" pheonomenon.

publiusr
2009-May-19, 08:54 PM
My memory may be off, but I do seem to remember some form of casing. I had no idea they had that later set up to debunk rods. I was more thinking about the use of all ceramic film camera of some sort so as to photograph electrical phenomena without some type of artifact or fuzziness that might degrade the image of electronic cameras...I wonder if anything like that exists.

Ara Pacis
2009-May-20, 02:50 AM
I'm not sure I follow your last part. Did the nuclear explosion cameras use mirrors to peak around protective barriers? I can't remember the exact setup.

mugaliens
2009-May-20, 06:17 AM
Yes - mirrors were used to keep the x-rays from fogging the film.

publiusr
2009-May-22, 03:53 PM
A ceramic camera might also help fight arcing.

stutefish
2009-May-28, 08:04 PM
What about the camera on New Horizons (http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/F/fastest_spacecraft.html)?


The highest speed at which any spacecraft has ever escaped from the Earth is 35,800 mph (57,600 km/h) in the case of the New Horizons probe, which was launched in January 2006 and is now heading toward Pluto. This beats the 32,400 mph (52,100 km/h) Earth escape speed of the Jupiter probe Pioneer 10, launched in 1972, and the 34,450 mph (55,400 km/h) Earth escape speed of the solar probe Ulysses, launched in 1990.
That seems like a pretty fast camera to me...

publiusr
2009-Jun-04, 09:41 PM
So to speak. I don't think Helios had a camera--but those two are faster than NH IIRC.

slang
2009-Jun-05, 12:13 AM
So to speak. I don't think Helios had a camera--but those two are faster than NH IIRC.

Helios (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helios_probes). Didn't know about those.. New Horizons wiki page won't load for me right now but it might need an edit. :)

stutefish... read (or text search), then post :D