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Plat
2003-Dec-31, 04:41 AM
i was watching smallville a few hours ago(mainly because of lana lang or whatever the **** her name is) and it said that he was an alien, i never knew clark kent was from outer space and i heard hes from a crystaly planet

ToSeek
2003-Dec-31, 04:59 AM
His real name is Kal-El, and he's from the planet Krypton!

(What's the world coming to when this isn't common knowledge!? ;) )

Odinoneeye
2003-Dec-31, 05:50 AM
Next you'll tell me you didn't know Arnold Schwartzenegger was an alien.

Plat
2003-Dec-31, 07:57 AM
Next you'll tell me you didn't know Arnold Schwartzenegger was an alien.

lmfao, anywyas so he is from a crystaly planet

Paul Beardsley
2003-Dec-31, 10:20 AM
Like it's realistic to suppose that a man of steel could result from human DNA. Puh-lease!

(That's me trying to sound like Comic Book Guy on The Simpsons. Seriously, there's nothing whatsoever bad about not knowing the origin of a fictional character, although I must admit I thought it was common knowledge too.)

Paul

Matherly
2003-Dec-31, 02:39 PM
It always struck me as odd how many members of the Justice Leauge of America were aliens, or used alien technology...

Superman, the Martian Manhunter, the Green Lantern (human... but the ring is extraterrestrial), Hawkman/girl....

I dunno, I just expected more Americans (shrug)

SeanF
2003-Dec-31, 02:51 PM
It always struck me as odd how many members of the Justice Leauge of America were aliens, or used alien technology...

Superman, the Martian Manhunter, the Green Lantern (human... but the ring is extraterrestrial), Hawkman/girl....

I dunno, I just expected more Americans (shrug)

"American" isn't an ethnicity, Matherly. They may be immigrants, but that doesn't mean they're not Americans! :D

tuffel999
2003-Dec-31, 04:19 PM
i was watching smallville a few hours ago(mainly because of lana lang or whatever the [bad word deleted] her name is) and it said that he was an alien, i never knew clark kent was from outer space and i heard hes from a crystaly planet


Got to ask how big a rock have you been hiding under? :wink:

Amadeus
2003-Dec-31, 04:41 PM
Just in case you're wondering about it. E.T weren't from round here either! :lol:

To be young again.......

Alex W.
2003-Dec-31, 09:29 PM
The first time I ever found out about Superman was via the movie, which I saw on Tv when I was a kid. So I knew he was an alien from the start. I've actually never read the comics *ducks*

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2004-Jan-01, 06:09 AM
The first time I ever found out about Superman was via the movie, which I saw on Tv when I was a kid. So I knew he was an alien from the start. I've actually never read the comics *ducks*

I've got worse.

I've never actually seen more than 5 Minutes of the Movies, while Channel Surfing, Of Course.

All I've seen, in fact, are the T.V. Shows. *Gooses*

Alex W.
2004-Jan-01, 03:08 PM
Oh, well, that's not too bad, I watched The New Adventures of Superman habitually for the first three series or so.

pi is exactly 3
2004-Jan-01, 10:53 PM
Just in case you're wondering about it. E.T weren't from round here either! :lol:

To be young again.......

Wait a minute, E.T - Extra terrestrial ! I always thought he was a short malnourished kid with bad skin a big head and telekinetic powers.

thanks for clearing that up. :wink:

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2004-Jan-01, 11:24 PM
Oh, well, that's not too bad, I watched The New Adventures of Superman habitually for the first three series or so.

Really?

I watched it for Teri Hatcher.

Oh, and by the way, they may Be Real, but Spectacular, they Ain't ...

tracer
2004-Jan-05, 10:34 PM
Wait a minute, E.T - Extra terrestrial ! I always thought he was a short malnourished kid with bad skin a big head and telekinetic powers.
You forgot that he also swallowed a working light bulb. And has a branding iron for a finger.

RBG
2004-Jan-06, 10:11 PM
Next you'll tell me you didn't know Arnold Schwartzenegger was an alien.

lmfao, anywyas so he is from a crystaly planet

Not only alien but not really from a crystal planet. The crystal thing was a movie add-on to the original comic book story which, as I recall, had a non-crystal planet.

RBG

tracer
2004-Jan-07, 07:57 PM
The look of Planet Krypton, and the space ship that sent baby Kal-El to Earth, have changed with each re-telling of the Superman origin. Not just in movies and on TV, either -- every re-telling in the comic books looks different, too. In the 1930s, Jor-El's lab and Kal-El's spaceship looked like something out of the contemporary Flash Gordon serials, f'rinstance.

Alex12
2004-Jan-29, 01:34 PM
The look of Planet Krypton, and the space ship that sent baby Kal-El to Earth, have changed with each re-telling of the Superman origin. Not just in movies and on TV, either -- every re-telling in the comic books looks different, too. In the 1930s, Jor-El's lab and Kal-El's spaceship looked like something out of the contemporary Flash Gordon serials, f'rinstance.
I think a nuke blast slowly turned the planets core into Kryptonite causing a "green fever" (I thought fevers were only in response to viral and bacterial infections)

mike alexander
2004-Jan-30, 05:05 PM
Actually, I highly doubt you can call Superman an alien. Kryptonians are completely indistingusihable from terrestrial humans, right down to such minutae as hair patterns, fingernails and cartilaginous foldings of the nose and ears. Convergent evolution has never even gotten close to such detail. Add to that the planet Krypton being much larger than earth (hence higher surface gravity). The Kryptonian physique is a one gee physique. It didn't evolve on a high gee planet.

The only possible conclusion is that Krypton was colonized by terrestrial humans long enough ago that the inhabitants have no record of their origins. My own theory is that a truly alien race lifted a bunch of prehistoric humans and put them on Krypton as an experiment, giving them powers that would let them survive there.

Madcat
2004-Feb-01, 09:07 PM
Not entirely out of the question in that particular fictional universe. going further, might they have caused/planned for the planet's destruction as well?

I see a script here. Somebody give us money!

daver
2004-Feb-02, 05:19 PM
Has this been noted before--how closely the destruction of Krypton followed the activation of Jor-El's experimental space drive?

mike alexander
2004-Feb-02, 08:55 PM
Aside from my note in the other Superman thread, I don't know of any place. Of course, this is like Sherlock Holmes; there are jillions of people writing about it for decades.

daver
2004-Feb-04, 07:09 PM
Actually, I highly doubt you can call Superman an alien. Kryptonians are completely indistingusihable from terrestrial humans, right down to such minutae as hair patterns, fingernails and cartilaginous foldings of the nose and ears. Convergent evolution has never even gotten close to such detail. Add to that the planet Krypton being much larger than earth (hence higher surface gravity). The Kryptonian physique is a one gee physique. It didn't evolve on a high gee planet.

The only possible conclusion is that Krypton was colonized by terrestrial humans long enough ago that the inhabitants have no record of their origins. My own theory is that a truly alien race lifted a bunch of prehistoric humans and put them on Krypton as an experiment, giving them powers that would let them survive there.

Another possibility is that the yellow sun grants Kal-El another superpower, that of directed cell growth--he can unconsciously control his body shape (this might explain some of the red kryptonite effects). Kal-El as baby Clark perhaps was only marginally humanoid; but he grew into a more acceptable simulacrum.

Note that Clark's hair and fingernails never need to be trimmed, and he presumably doesn't shed skin cells. This would also explain his annoyingly good looks and muscular development (and some of the red kryptonite results). I haven't examined the Superman outfit to see if there's a tell-tale bulge in the genital area--a lack of such might indicate that Kal-El's mimicry only extended to the areas normally displayed in public.

(On the other other hand, the inhabitants of the City of Kandor, and the various Phantom Zone inhabitants, tend to imply that Kryptonians really were humanoid (to Doc Smith's 9 decimal points)).

tbg
2004-Feb-06, 05:20 AM
Another possibility is that the yellow sun grants Kal-El another superpower, that of directed cell growth--he can unconsciously control his body shape (this might explain some of the red kryptonite effects). Kal-El as baby Clark perhaps was only marginally humanoid; but he grew into a more acceptable simulacrum.No, he has NEVER been portrayed as thus in any version of the story. The only thing even close to this would be the rumors that Marlon Brando wanted a briefcase to portray Jor El on screen because he thought Kryptonians should be able to control their shape. Everywhere else Kryptonians have been, at least on the surface, humans with superpowers while under a yellow sun. Genetically, in some versions they're close enough to successfully procreate with human, in other versions they aren't.


Note that Clark's hair and fingernails never need to be trimmed, Yes they do. He trims them by reflecting his heat vision off special piece of reflective metal.

Anyway, so Kryptonians look just like humans and that isn't believable. Hey, they aren't the only DCU aliens to look just like humans. There are tons of them. The alien version of Hawkman, for one, the people on whatever planet it is Adam Strange gets teleported to for another. I'm sure there are many others.

And there are some that Kryptonians are probably even closer to than humans, such as the Daxamites, who are pretty much like Kryptonians, home system has a red sun, get the same powers as Kryptonians under yellow suns, but they react to lead the way Superman reacts to Kryptonite, only it tends to be even more deadly, as unlike Kryptonite, if you remove the lead from their presence, they don't get better.

AKONI
2004-Feb-06, 11:04 AM
Has this been noted before--how closely the destruction of Krypton followed the activation of Jor-El's experimental space drive?

Jor-El knew it was coming. He tried to warn the people and they mocked him. I forgot if the ship was an experimental ship or if he only had time to build one that small, but it was built as an escape ship from a doomed planet.

Sort of like the Ark and the flood.

daver
2004-Feb-06, 11:31 PM
Has this been noted before--how closely the destruction of Krypton followed the activation of Jor-El's experimental space drive?

Jor-El knew it was coming. He tried to warn the people and they mocked him. I forgot if the ship was an experimental ship or if he only had time to build one that small, but it was built as an escape ship from a doomed planet.

Sort of like the Ark and the flood.

Well, here's Krypton, rolling along sedately for billions of years, until a scientist starts work on an interstellar drive. All of a sudden, unusual tecktonic activity. And then, the instant a version capable of carrying a passenger is activated, the planet blows itself to pieces. Coincidence?

daver
2004-Feb-06, 11:34 PM
Note that Clark's hair and fingernails never need to be trimmed, Yes they do. He trims them by reflecting his heat vision off special piece of reflective metal.

Hmm, another change. In the old Supes, they never needed to be cut. In one, Red Kryptonite caused Superboy's hair and beard to grow; it needed the combined power of Krypto's and Superboy's heat vision to cut.

There used to be a planet inwards of Krypton; its inhabitants got super powers as well, but only one at a time. So, if one of them were using his X-ray vision to examine your girlfriend, you could bop him over the head with a champagne bottle.

AKONI
2004-Feb-06, 11:42 PM
Has this been noted before--how closely the destruction of Krypton followed the activation of Jor-El's experimental space drive?

Jor-El knew it was coming. He tried to warn the people and they mocked him. I forgot if the ship was an experimental ship or if he only had time to build one that small, but it was built as an escape ship from a doomed planet.

Sort of like the Ark and the flood.

Well, here's Krypton, rolling along sedately for billions of years, until a scientist starts work on an interstellar drive. All of a sudden, unusual tecktonic activity. And then, the instant a version capable of carrying a passenger is activated, the planet blows itself to pieces. Coincidence?

A man is in a burning building... he leaps from the building just before the floor he was standing on collapses. Coincidence?

The creators of the Superman story are the ones who defined the origins of what happened. They say Jor-El was a scientist who discovered this great problem with his planet, and built the ship just in time to save his son.

I side with the authors since it's their story and so if they say such and such happened, then such and such happened.

Now if DC wants to change something in the story or provide some new revelation that's fine, it's there right, but it's not up to me to contradict a work of fiction I neither created nor was given the authority to change.

Pointing out a contradiction though would be different (though this doesn't fall into that category), because when we do that we're pointing out a mistake in the continuity of a story.

mike alexander
2004-Feb-06, 11:45 PM
daver makes the good point: which Superman? My canonical Superman is the Silver Age guy from the 50's and 60's. I tried reading the modern one a while back but realized that the whole shebang had changed and I was walking in right in the middle. And I didn't particularly want to catch up.

Ah, Clark, Lois, Lana, Lori, Jimmy, Perry....

AKONI
2004-Feb-06, 11:53 PM
daver makes the good point: which Superman? My canonical Superman is the Silver Age guy from the 50's and 60's. I tried reading the modern one a while back but realized that the whole shebang had changed and I was walking in right in the middle. And I didn't particularly want to catch up.

Ah, Clark, Lois, Lana, Lori, Jimmy, Perry....

Back in the late 1980's they turned the whole thing over to an artist/writer (I forgot his name), and he decided he was going to make changes to Superman. He even re-did the first comic. he was rather arrogant about the whole thing, not because he proposed to do this, but because of his attitude towards anyone who even questioned him about it. I heard he was extemely rude to the kids at the conventions even while he was in front of a microphone taking questions (I read the reporting on this).

I wish I could remember his name. Back then I was still young enough to have roommates and a few of them were comic book junkies, so I was reading some of the stuff they brought home.


I don't know,.. I can deal with certain changes. Spider-Man (my favorite) was bitten by a radioactive spider, but they changed it for the movie - which makes sense. Even if it is still flakey at least they updated it enough for audiences to swallow. I also had no problem with the webbing coming from his body instead of something he invented. He was supposed to be very smart, but not Reed Richards smart, and since the top scientists today couldn't devlope those web shooters then either could a kid in high school.

mike alexander
2004-Feb-07, 12:13 AM
Thanks for that AKONI.

Oh, change and evolution in a character is fine, even to be encouraged. But imagine if Sherlock Holmes had come back from the Reichenbach Falls as a gentle, child-loving philanthrophist. Ick.

I've thumbed a few contemporary comics (of more classic characters) at the bookstore and find them very dark and cold, high on technique and low on heart. Also seems to be a lot of gratuitous brutality.

I wonder. If popular entertainment to some extent reflects current cultural trends...

Odinoneeye
2004-Feb-07, 11:35 AM
The writer/artist you're thinking of is John Byrne. Hence the phrase, "Superman's been Byrned to the ground"

He showed a lot of arrogance with his changes. He showed no respect for the Superman mythos.

I think his worst change was not having the Kents die. I always thought the death of his parents was an integral part of Superman's psyche. He knew that even with all the things he could do, there were important things he couldn't do.

AKONI
2004-Feb-07, 09:19 PM
The writer/artist you're thinking of is John Byrne. Hence the phrase, "Superman's been Byrned to the ground"

He showed a lot of arrogance with his changes. He showed no respect for the Superman mythos.

I think his worst change was not having the Kents die. I always thought the death of his parents was an integral part of Superman's psyche. He knew that even with all the things he could do, there were important things he couldn't do.

You're right! And now that you said that I just remembered I read a book he wrote (not a comic) called Whipping Boy.

What a piece of crap.

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2004-Feb-08, 06:27 AM
The writer/artist you're thinking of is John Byrne. Hence the phrase, "Superman's been Byrned to the ground"

He showed a lot of arrogance with his changes. He showed no respect for the Superman mythos.

I think his worst change was not having the Kents die. I always thought the death of his parents was an integral part of Superman's psyche. He knew that even with all the things he could do, there were important things he couldn't do.

You're right! And now that you said that I just remembered I read a book he wrote (not a comic) called Whipping Boy.

What a piece of crap.

What?

I liked that book, it had a Good Message.

AKONI
2004-Feb-09, 01:27 AM
It wasn't the story I had an issue with, it was the writing itself. It read like it was written by a 10th grader.

daver
2004-Feb-09, 05:15 PM
I think his worst change was not having the Kents die. I always thought the death of his parents was an integral part of Superman's psyche. He knew that even with all the things he could do, there were important things he couldn't do.
The Superman movies had Jonathan Kent die, but Martha was still alive. Of course, the current animated Superman has both still alive.

frenat
2004-Feb-09, 08:35 PM
They are both still alive? The last I saw, (I only read the graphic novels when I gety a chance in Barnes and Noble) they were presumed dead in the "Our Worlds at War" series. I assume they were found alive later then?

Russ
2004-Feb-09, 11:28 PM
Has this been noted before--how closely the destruction of Krypton followed the activation of Jor-El's experimental space drive?


Jor-El knew it was coming. He tried to warn the people and they mocked him. I forgot if the ship was an experimental ship or if he only had time to build one that small, but it was built as an escape ship from a doomed planet.

Sort of like the Ark and the flood.
Jor_El promised the high councel that he and wife would not try to excape Krypton. That is why the ship was sized to hold only Kal-El. At least in the 1978 movie, that's they way they played it. :D

daver
2004-Feb-09, 11:38 PM
Jor_El promised the high councel that he and wife would not try to excape Krypton. That is why the ship was sized to hold only Kal-El. At least in the 1978 movie, that's they way they played it. :D

In one of the comic versions (as noted, there have been many) Jor-El didn't have a full-sized version of the craft, but the test ship he was playing with could hold an infant-sized payload. At least in that version, it was pretty clear that if Jor-El's entire family could have fit on the ship, they would have.

In this reality, Jor-El's brother was experimenting with a similar design (saucer instead of rocket, if it matters), and pulled the same trick with his daughter.

AKONI
2004-Feb-10, 02:41 AM
Jor_El promised the high councel that he and wife would not try to excape Krypton. That is why the ship was sized to hold only Kal-El. At least in the 1978 movie, that's they way they played it. :D

In one of the comic versions (as noted, there have been many) Jor-El didn't have a full-sized version of the craft, but the test ship he was playing with could hold an infant-sized payload. At least in that version, it was pretty clear that if Jor-El's entire family could have fit on the ship, they would have.

In this reality, Jor-El's brother was experimenting with a similar design (saucer instead of rocket, if it matters), and pulled the same trick with his daughter.

Is that supposed to be the origin of Supergirl? I was a Marvel not a DC fan as a kid so I didn't buy enough Superman comics to find out how she came into existence.

frenat
2004-Feb-10, 03:44 AM
I think that is the old origin of Supergirl. In the current stories she is a creation of a good Luthor in a parallel universe.

daver
2004-Feb-10, 05:15 PM
I think that is the old origin of Supergirl. In the current stories she is a creation of a good Luthor in a parallel universe.

RIght. That's the pre-Crisis Supergirl. Supergirl was one of many casualties of the Crisis (as was, I believe, The Flash. I had heard that Kid Flash survived, which seemed a bit strange). Comic books have a hard time letting heroes stay dead; I expect they found some excuse to resurrect some of the victims.

mike alexander
2004-Feb-11, 12:30 AM
Oooh, old memories coming back...

Supergirl is Superman's cousin by Jor El's brother, Zor El (I think).

When Krypton blew up, a chunk holding the city they were living in was blown off intact. They managed to cover the ground with lead sheeting to protect themselves from the kryptonite radiation. Sometime later there was a meteor shower that punched holes in the sheeting and Zor El launched Supergirl off in his MarkII ship to save her life.

Which also means that the incident that destroyed the planet also converted the crust to kryptonite. Pretty hefty incident to transmute an entire planetary mass.

Isn't memory wonderful? Now, where are my keys...

daver
2004-Feb-11, 02:20 AM
Isn't memory wonderful? Now, where are my keys...
Hey, just so long as you remember the important things...
[inane ditty]
Spiderman, Spiderman
Does whatever a spider can
Spins a web
Any size
Catches thieves...
[/inane ditty]

frenat
2004-Feb-11, 03:15 AM
The current info from the comics is that the inhabitants of Krypton were genetically linked to the planet and would die if they left. This was done by Superman's ancestor Kem-L. Jor El developed a serum that allowed his son to be able to leave the planet and still live.

AKONI
2004-Feb-11, 05:41 AM
The current info from the comics is that the inhabitants of Krypton were genetically linked to the planet and would die if they left. This was done by Superman's ancestor Kem-L. Jor El developed a serum that allowed his son to be able to leave the planet and still live.

Really??? That's what they're saying now? What's next? Superman was bitten by a radioactive spider?

Grand_Lunar
2004-Mar-06, 02:58 PM
Next you'll tell me you didn't know Arnold Schwartzenegger was an alien.

"Ahnuld" ain't an alien! Cybernetic Organism.
"My mission is to protect you and run for governer of California. Now, where's my stoogies?!"

Alex12
2004-Apr-07, 01:17 PM
Actually, I highly doubt you can call Superman an alien. Kryptonians are completely indistingusihable from terrestrial humans, right down to such minutae as hair patterns, fingernails and cartilaginous foldings of the nose and ears. Convergent evolution has never even gotten close to such detail. Add to that the planet Krypton being much larger than earth (hence higher surface gravity). The Kryptonian physique is a one gee physique. It didn't evolve on a high gee planet.
Where does it say that Krypton is bigger than earth?


The only possible conclusion is that Krypton was colonized by terrestrial humans long enough ago that the inhabitants have no record of their origins. My own theory is that a truly alien race lifted a bunch of prehistoric humans and put them on Krypton as an experiment, giving them powers that would let them survive there.
Nice theory, but superman needs solar energy from a "yellow sun" (a light with a yellow bulb wouldn't work). My question is why Martian Manhunter (from mars) looks so alien in his natural state, and superman looks so perfectly human. I would think martians would be closer to humans, if panspermia (sp?) is in fact true. If Martians could fly, become intangible, shapeshift and had the level of tech seen in the TV shows and comic books (in flashbacks, illusions, etc.) I would think they would have the sense to colonize other planets to prevent extinction if something happens (which it did). sorry about all the parenthesis

mike alexander
2004-Apr-07, 09:25 PM
Ah, but Alex12... your Superman or mine? Check my earlier post. The original didn't need to charge up. And the original origin (sic) specifically mentioned Krypton was bigger and heavier, i.e., higher gravity.

So I'm not wrong. But neither are you.

Mokele Mbembe
2004-Apr-07, 10:20 PM
I would think martians would be closer to humans, if panspermia (sp?) is in fact true

The more area that is taken into account, the higher the chances of the "impossible" actually occurring... it'd be unlikely to find creatures on Mars that look just like us, but if you search the entire universe, the chances become better...

PhantomWolf
2004-Apr-07, 10:28 PM
I think most things have been said. However here's a sumary, it might have a few new bits. ;)

Firstly as has been stated, yes Supes is an alien and is from Krypton and planet that exploded killing all of the inhabitants. In the begining he was to have very limited powers, basicly the faster than a speeding bullet more powerful than a locomotive about to leap tall buildings. Over the years he got more and more powerful, flight, heat vision, x-ray vision, able to survive in space forever, etc. By the late 70's he was powerful enough to spin a planet on his finger, and they were introducing more and more rubbish to combat that (50 different colours of Kryptonite?) as well as having to outfit every bady with kryptonite or magic to pose a challange (They had more Krytonite than the entire planet of Krypton.)

Added to this was the number of parallel DC Universes that confused the reader more that the Spiderman saga. This was all brought to a halt in 1981 with the DC Universe Crisis. Many heroes that weren't as popular were killed of (including Supergirl) and the many universes were combined into one and restarted, hence there were some modifications to Superman's history. This included a vast toning down of his powers, the removal of his ever having been Superboy, but rather that his powers appeared later, when he was about 18, and that restrictions based on his being a Solar Battery, meaning that without exposure to the Yellow Star he would gradually use up his store of energy and lose his powers. At the same time they removed his weakness to Red Sun and turned all of the Kryptonite on Earth into Harmless Iron.

Since '81 there have been a few other changes, the most well-known was the "Long-haired Clark" who returned to life after Doomsday (who turned out to be Kryptonian too *yawn*) and the Electrical Superman after his trips into Kandor made him phase shift into an energy being.

The basics of Kryptonians are such that asthetically they appear human, however their DNA is different and hence impossible to clone (though this has been tried a number of times, usually resulting in a Bizzaro.) They were bonded to Krypton by an invention of one of Clark's ancestors (I can't recall which off-hand,) the Eradicator. It was a machine that created the genetic bond of the Kryptonians to Krypton. It later arrived on Earth and tried to rebuild Krypton, but Superman stopped and destroyed it. The only remaining part of the world it created was the Fortress in Antarica. The edradicator returned after Clark had been killed and assumed his form as one of the Four Supermen. Clark (or Kal El) was able to leave the planet because his father created an antidote for this genetic bonding. Unfortunately Clark was the only one that was able to receive it before the planet blew, and hence the only surviver.

Now, in the pre-crisis days, there was a city that survived, and one of those people was Clark's cousin. With the city slowly dying, her parents used the same formula that was used on Clark and sent her to him. Kara El became Supergirl. She took on the identity of Linda Lee, and after being adopted by the Davners became Linda Lee Davners. She was killed during the Crisis. Post crisis, Brainiac created a pocket universe and in this universe there were three Kryptonian criminals who were reeking havoc on the worlds. Alt-Earth was run by a benevolent Lex Luthor and his wife Lana Lang. When they were attacked by the Criminals, Lana was killed, and in response Lex created a Protomatter being called Matrix and instilled her with Lana's personality and memories. He also custumed her after Earth's greatest hero, a man that had left many years ago, Superman. With the Real Superman in the pocket Universe, Mae was sent to find "Superman" and bring him back, she did and in the end Supes had to kill the criminals, using Kryponite (an act that he still suffers from.) The only survivors were Supes and Mae (who was hurt pretty bad) and he brought her back and gave her to the Kents to raise and heal. Cutting a long story short, Mae became involved with Lex on Earth, then found out he was using her and nearly killed him, Mae them fled and a while later attempted to save a young girl from a cult. They ended up combining into what became known as a Earth Angel. Harking back to the Pre-Crisis days, the girl's name was Linda Davners and together they protected Leesburg as the Supergirl/Earth Angel. This carried on until they meet the Carnivore where Supergirl was "killed", and Linda was left with very reduced powers and a mission to find Mae. She eventually did, tracking her to the Garden of Eden and in a battle with Lillith (the Carnivore's mother) Linda was killed. Mae ended up joining not with Linda, but with Twilight who then brought Linda back to life. This I feel was pretty much the end and after about another 5 issues (#75) it was canned. Today the Supergirl has the same sort of powers that Superman did in his conception.


Hope that was a little helpful. :)

mike alexander
2004-Apr-07, 10:28 PM
Hey. Why is it panspermia and not panovia?

Aside from the fact that 'Panovia' sounds vaguely like a Russian ballerina.

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2004-Apr-07, 10:40 PM
Um, PhantomWolf, all I can do is say, "Wow!"

With all that Comic Reading, when do you find time to Sleep?

:lol:

=D>

PhantomWolf
2004-Apr-07, 10:49 PM
Sleep? What's that?

mike alexander
2004-Apr-07, 11:07 PM
Incredible, Phantom.

All I can add is distinct memories of reading the comics. Argo City was blown off Krypton intact, but nevertheless the rock was converted to kryptonite. The inhabitants saved themselves by covering the ground with lead sheeting (how convenient they had a large supply). Matters went on fairly well for some time until the city ran into a meteor storm which punctured the lead and let the kyrptonite radiation out, at which time Supergirl was sent off to Earth.

That's what I remember, anyhow. It might even be true.

Master258
2004-Apr-08, 04:20 AM
I've never read the comics, never seen the movie, never wacthed the tv show but even I knew he was not of this earth.

Odinoneeye
2004-Apr-09, 07:30 AM
A couple of minor nitpicks here.

DC had tried to scale down Supey before the crisis. At one point, he had been stripped of 1/3rd of his strength. Of course, since his strength was basically infinite, 1/3rd of infinite is...

Anyway, they tried it. About that time was when a scientist's experiment turned all the kryptonite on earth into iron (this was also long before the crisis).

Also, just to show my extreme geekiness. The chunk of rock Argo City was on turned into anti-kryptonite, not kryptonite. The difference is that anti-kryptonite works on non powered kryptonians and regular kryptonite works on super powered ones. Yes, I know this.

And just because it was really cool... once Supergirl kicked the moon out of orbit. Why? To stop a sorceress from completeing a spell which needed a particular conjunction of the moon and several planets. Bad astronomy but great comic writing!

Starlionblue
2004-Apr-11, 06:59 PM
For a very humorous look at Superman and how he would fare in a relationship with a human woman, read Larry Niven's brilliant "Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex" here:

http://www.rawbw.com/~svw/superman.html

I defy you not to laugh out loud. Several times.

davepy
2004-Apr-13, 01:46 PM
Nice summary by PhantomWolf. Some nitpicks. :)


This was all brought to a halt in 1981 with the DC Universe Crisis. Many heroes that weren't as popular were killed of (including Supergirl) and the many universes were combined into one and restarted, hence there were some modifications to Superman's history. This included a vast toning down of his powers, the removal of his ever having been Superboy, but rather that his powers appeared later, when he was about 18, and that restrictions based on his being a Solar Battery, meaning that without exposure to the Yellow Star he would gradually use up his store of energy and lose his powers.

Actually, the Crisis didn't start 'til 1985, although things had been building for a year or so before then. Also, Superman's reboot happened separately from Crisis at the arbitrary hands of John Byrne in 1986.


The basics of Kryptonians are such that asthetically they appear human, however their DNA is different and hence impossible to clone (though this has been tried a number of times, usually resulting in a Bizzaro.)

This is interesting. Wasn't the Cyborg--one of the 4 fake Supermen that appeared after his "death"--a clone of Superman bonded with cybernetic parts (and whatshisname's brain)? I seem to recall his genetic pattern matching Superman's perfectly.

PhantomWolf
2004-Apr-13, 08:55 PM
The basics of Kryptonians are such that asthetically they appear human, however their DNA is different and hence impossible to clone (though this has been tried a number of times, usually resulting in a Bizzaro.)

This is interesting. Wasn't the Cyborg--one of the 4 fake Supermen that appeared after his "death"--a clone of Superman bonded with cybernetic parts (and whatshisname's brain)? I seem to recall his genetic pattern matching Superman's perfectly.

Firstly I'll admit I was working from memory rather than resourses, so yeah it wasn't perfect. :)

The Cyborg - Originally he was a Astronaut called Hank Henshaw. The shuttle he was on was erradiated and Superman attempted to save the crew. Without getting the right books (The story is retold during the Reign of the Supermen) I can't recall all the details, but somehow Henshaw gained the ability to control electronics through that erradiation (You think Buzz picked this up on the way to the moon?) Anyways during the situation he was killed, but his mind was able to latch onto some nearby electronics, Clark's birth matrix. He blamed Supes for his death, and with the birth matrix was able to dupicate Supes in the Cyborg form. Hope that helps?

davepy
2004-Apr-14, 03:22 PM
I remember the origins of the Cyborg, except what his original name was (I read Supes pretty faithfully bet. '90-'94~ish). My point was that his organic components was considered a clone so was wondering where you got the info that Supes couldn't be cloned. That wasn't something I recalled from the Superman mythos, at least the Byrne Superman. Then again, I think there was maybe only one instance of a Bizarro Superman post-Byrne, so maybe they didn't explore the issue as much?

BTW, I knew most of the years from memory too, only because I remember what year of school I was in when Crisis first started (along with Marvel's counter, Secret Wars). I did have to look up when Byrne's Superman started tho. :)