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View Full Version : How to create a micro-black hole?



robross
2009-May-16, 11:53 PM
What are the minimum number of mass particles, and what types, that could be used to create a micro black hole?

I assume you could not create a micro black hole from a single electron, since that's a fundamental particle and should not be compressible. Could you somehow create a mbh from two electrons? What about a single quark? Is that further compressible, and if so, wouldn't that imply it was composed of smaller constituents?

So could you form a mbh from two quarks, by compressing them far more than they normally bind in a normal proton/neutron?

Rob

astromark
2009-May-17, 09:29 AM
In one of the many billions of Universes that may be possible. In this one, NO. That's not possible in this universe.

robross
2009-May-18, 03:32 AM
In one of the many billions of Universes that may be possible. In this one, NO. That's not possible in this universe.

Are you saying that micro black holes are not possible, or that forming one by two quarks was not possible? That was just part of my question. If not two quarks, then what is the minimum number of particles that could create a micro black hole?

Incidentally, although as far as I know, no micro black holes have ever been observed, it seems that a good majority of physicists seem to think they're theoretically possible, and that the LHC might even be able to make them, so I don't think they're impossible in our universe.

Rob

JohnD
2009-May-18, 06:31 AM
When Hawking theorised that "Black holes have hair", he suggested that they do radiate, at a rate inversely proportional to their mass. A black hole with a mass of 2.28 10^-5 kg has a life of one second.

If this aspect of BH physics is correct, a two quark BH would exist for an extremely short period of time. Time can be considered to be quantised, and the smallest period of time, Plank time is also extremely small. If Plank time is larger than the life of a two quark BH, the a two quark BH cannot exist.

The smallest possible size for a BH has been also considered in terms of the local radius of space. A mass of 2x10^-8 is suggested as the Plank mass and a low limit to the size of a BH, as then the Compton wavelength exceeds the Schwarzschild radius.

John

mugaliens
2009-May-18, 06:43 AM
Excellent, JohnD - I expecially like the minima with respect to the mass, in terms of Planck time.