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Fiery Phoenix
2009-May-22, 01:58 PM
Is it just an awesomely amazing coincidence that the orbiting phenomena is almost always counterclockwise in our Universe? There's got to be a physical reason for this. I hardly think it's just a coincidence.

Someone explain it to me, in the easiest words possible. Thanks. :)

Amber Robot
2009-May-22, 02:22 PM
Counterclockwise with respect to what?

Peter B
2009-May-22, 02:22 PM
G'day Fiery Phoenix

What "orbiting phenomena" are you referring to?

The planets in our Solar System all orbit the Sun in the same direction as a consequence of the process of the Solar System's creation. And we orbit "counter-clockwise" (anti-clockwise in other parts of the world!) only when seen from "above" the Solar System - that is, from the direction the North Pole points.

Which other orbiting phenomena orbit only anti-clockwise?

Fiery Phoenix
2009-May-22, 02:36 PM
G'day Fiery Phoenix

What "orbiting phenomena" are you referring to?

The planets in our Solar System all orbit the Sun in the same direction as a consequence of the process of the Solar System's creation. And we orbit "counter-clockwise" (anti-clockwise in other parts of the world!) only when seen from "above" the Solar System - that is, from the direction the North Pole points.

Which other orbiting phenomena orbit only anti-clockwise?

That's exactly what I was seeking. Strangely, I gave zero attention to the frame of reference. I just simulated it using Universe Sandbox and confirmed what you said.

Sorry, I was just over-thinking all this. Haha... :lol:

MAPNUT
2009-May-22, 03:29 PM
Sorry, I was just over-thinking all this. Haha... :lol:

Well, that's one way of putting it. ;)

Jeff Root
2009-May-23, 06:42 PM
When an artist draws an explanatory diagram of the Solar System or of the
Milky Way galaxy, he or she needs to choose a specific orientation. Putting
it so that the stuff moves counterclockwise around the center matches the
convention that Earth's North Pole goes at the top. Looking down on Earth's
North Pole, the planet is rotating counterclockwise. But if you look down on
the South Pole, it rotates clockwise. North and south are of course
completely arbitrary. "Up" is away from Earth's center, not toward a pole.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

a1call
2009-May-23, 10:20 PM
On that note, why do we call the North pole, that rather than the South pole when we all well know that the North pole of a compass always points to the South pole of any magnet? :lol:

grant hutchison
2009-May-23, 10:44 PM
On that note, why do we call the North pole, that rather than the South pole when we all well know that the North pole of a compass always points to the South pole of any magnet? :lol:Priority of discovery. First we invented "north", then we named the end of a compass needle that points north "north", then we named the ends of all magnets after the ends of orientated compass needles.
Then we sighed a little in anticipation of your question. :lol:

Grant Hutchison

astromark
2009-May-23, 10:52 PM
North South, Up and Down. Only with respect to your refrance frame.
As you approach the (any) solar system if you were to dive under it and look from what you northern hemisphere people call south... what direction is it rotating..?
Who can tell me from what prospective I must think... No. no, NO.
Looking at the galaxy from edge on its moving in a left to right direction. No it's not. because if I rotate on my own axis.. its now going the other way. There is and can be no right and wrong here... its conditioned thinking. Think outside the square and all will be clear. (Or watch reruns of 'Star Trek' to gain perspective.)Lol:)

robross
2009-May-24, 02:47 AM
Is there a diagram available anywhere that shows the orbital plane of our solar system in relation to the orbital plane of the galaxy? I've always been curious to know how "tilted" our solar system is with respect to the galactic plane.

Rob

AndrewJ
2009-May-24, 02:55 AM
I believe our ecliptic is tilted around 60 degrees to the galactic plane. Some sources, printed and on the internet, erroneously state the difference to be 90 degrees (presumably by adding in the 23.5 degree tilt of Earth's axis, although this is on a different plane).

Sorry, I don't know of any diagrams.

astromark
2009-May-24, 05:30 AM
Now I am not so sure of the view of the Milky Way you get from the northern hemisphere. Being to young or drunk when there... :) From where I live in New Zealand we see the Milky Way right overhead stretching from horizon to horizon. Winter nights are seemingly best... If you become aware of the ecliptic. That being the path across your sky of the planets and sun, you can 'see' the angle difference. For me at 39.55 deg. south. That ecliptic is a little north of overhead. While the Galaxy plain appears to be from South East to North West. Straight over the top.
So I would not advise you to not ask this question... but with the utmost respect invite you to go out on any clear night and try and see this stuff, first hand. You might see it for yourself...

grant hutchison
2009-May-24, 10:34 AM
Is there a diagram available anywhere that shows the orbital plane of our solar system in relation to the orbital plane of the galaxy? I've always been curious to know how "tilted" our solar system is with respect to the galactic plane.Here (http://www.ghutchison.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/orbits/galaxy.jpg) is one I prepared earlier. :) It shows the sixty-degree tilt well.
Galaxy crosses the view horizontally, galactic core in the middle of the picture. Planetary orbits in blue. If we could see the Earth, its northern hemisphere would be tilted towards us (the cyan lines are the celestial grid, with the equator crossing the top left corner of the frame, where the marker for 18h RA appears). Motion of the solar system around the galaxy is pretty much leftwards, with a slight rise and a slight inward movement towards the centre of the galaxy.
Prepared in Celestia.

Grant Hutchison

Fiery Phoenix
2009-May-24, 02:00 PM
Here (http://www.ghutchison.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/orbits/galaxy.jpg) is one I prepared earlier. :) It shows the sixty-degree tilt well.
Galaxy crosses the view horizontally, galactic core in the middle of the picture. Planetary orbits in blue. If we could see the Earth, its northern hemisphere would be tilted towards us (the cyan lines are the celestial grid, with the equator crossing the top left corner of the frame, where the marker for 18h RA appears). Motion of the solar system around the galaxy is pretty much leftwards, with a slight rise and a slight inward movement towards the centre of the galaxy.
Prepared in Celestia.

Grant Hutchison

That's pretty cool, Grant. Thanks. :)

robross
2009-May-24, 09:06 PM
That's pretty cool, Grant. Thanks. :)

Yea, what Fiery Phoenix said! :)

grant hutchison
2009-May-24, 09:19 PM
Pleasure, guys. :)

Grant Hutchison