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View Full Version : idea, what do you think [dimensions, dark matter]



ToneyTime
2009-May-28, 04:01 AM
Ok, I by no means have any special knowledge in Physics or any such, just an interest so if my question makes no sense, I apologize now.

I've been thinking about the subject of dark matter and how it is found in mass roughly where normal matter is found and only effects with gravity (If thats way off, sorry). Now, also considering a chance for multiple dimensions separated on the event of atomic chances, what if in a sort of 4th axis, these dimesions are layered on top of one another and dark matter is only normal matter from layered dimensions near our own, with gravitons or other particles passing through, effecting our own world?

That would make sense as to why we can't see it, why its clustered near normal matter and why it makes up such a large portion of our known universe, with multiple layers of replicated but slightly different universes pulling at each other through the fabric.

So.. any thoughts? Inaccuracies? I would like to sharpen my idea so any comments or corrections are welcome, just take it easy on me :lol:

Sticks
2009-May-28, 04:58 AM
Please read the forum rules, particularly the section concerning "Against the Mainstream" as this post skirts close to that

Ken G
2009-May-28, 07:48 AM
Now, also considering a chance for multiple dimensions separated on the event of atomic chances, what if in a sort of 4th axis, these dimesions are layered on top of one another and dark matter is only normal matter from layered dimensions near our own, with gravitons or other particles passing through, effecting our own world?
Interpreting your question as, "why isn't this idea considered for dark matter", I'd say the answer is, your model does not explain why light only exists in one of those "planes" of which you speak. You see, dark matter does not merely not make light that we can see, it does not make light at all. If it did, it would behave very differently, for light is very effective at cooling things and sometimes can even push things around, but above all it mediates the electromagnetic interactions that give normal matter much of its qualities and controls how it collides with other normal matter, etc.. Your model sounds more like an explanation for there being more gravity than we think, with no other consequences, but were that the case a simpler way to handle it would be to just crank up the gravitational constant G. The reason that does not work is that the dark matter behaves differently from matter that couples to light, and that is the reason the ratio of regular matter to dark matter varies dramatically with scale (there is very little dark matter in your room, for example).

Having said that, I would note that in one respect, imagining a higher dimension is in fact a perfectly normal way to think about matter. Elementary particles have various "quantum numbers" that distinguish their properties. We normally imagine them as all existing in the same space, and carry around with them these abstract quantum numbers, but one could just as easily imagine that the quantum numbers are a kind of "other axis" such that each particular type of matter, say electrons or protons, are "alone" in their spacetime-plus-quantum-number space, and it is only when we project out the quantum numbers that they all pile up in the same spacetime. That's a perfectly mainstream view, we just don't normally think of quantum numbers as real dimensions-- but I don't see why we couldn't. But it would still beg the question of what is dark matter-- what are the appropriate quantum numbers there.