PDA

View Full Version : Apprenticeship/training/education question



Maha Vailo
2009-Jun-02, 01:48 PM
Well, I've been looking for a new job, preferably in the landscape, groundskeeping, or other plant-related fields, but I've run into a few hurdles. Getting a commercial driver's license is easy, but I don't have any clue as how to get electrical, plumbing and HVAC experience or training. How might I get an apprenticeship (which my mother says I should try and find) or education (which is easier) in such a field?

- Maha Vailo

Musashi
2009-Jun-02, 02:42 PM
There are basically two ways to get trade education/experience. Join a trade union and work through their apprenticeship program or get hired by a non-union trade contractor and learn from whatever system he or she has set up.

Maha Vailo
2009-Jun-02, 02:54 PM
There are basically two ways to get trade education/experience. Join a trade union and work through their apprenticeship program or get hired by a non-union trade contractor and learn from whatever system he or she has set up.

Well, my mother says that a union is rather rigorous (passing a test, abiding by the rules of the union, etc.), and I don't know where I could find a trade contractor that would hire me.

Didn't know that apprenticeship was a union thing, thanks for the info.

- Maha Vailo

BigDon
2009-Jun-02, 03:18 PM
Can you get a class A driver's liscense?

In moving we call that a "Texas Ph.D" as you can often earn as much as your average post doc, especially if you don't mind being away from home for eight to ten months out of the year. ~110,000$ to 250,000$ depending how hard you work and what outfit you hook up with.

Then, after a couple of years you get organized, buy a few more rigs and then have other's drive for you. And that's where you start becoming actually wealthy. I've seen that pattern work at least six times while working as a mover.

"Wait a sec, Bubba over there is a multi-millionaire?" (His name was really Bubba, looked like a thirty five year old Santa Claus in bib coveralls. From central Texas)

Bubba overheard me and since we were all on break he explained how the last eight years went.

He did the hard driving thing for three years, saved enough to buy three more used rigs and as a man can only drive one at a time formed a small company. This proved to be so profitable, due to hiring the right people, that after the first year as a company he started clearing embarrassing amounts of money, his words.

The other five examples were pretty much slightly more convoluted versions of Bubba's story. Bubba said the hardest part was avoiding the temptations a sudden influx of disposible wealth can bring. That can sink you quickly. (Seen that myself in the tropical fish business. Long story.)

My grandfather did the exact same thing back in the thirties up in Washington/Oregon. He didn't fight in WWII as he was already doing a vital job, running a large transportation company. He progressed out of household moving and moved logs and other goods. (When Granny passed away the entire route from the funeral home to the cemetary was lined both sides of the street with tractor trailer rigs, with the driver's sitting in them with their hats over their hearts, for over a mile and a half. Never saw anything like it before or since.) Granddad started his moving company with horse drawn wagons, then early panel trucks. My great uncle, (Granddad's brother in law) invented the sleeper cab.

You have to take advantage of the fact that we are a huge country compared to Britain, let's say, and folks want to move all the time and take their stuff with them. Your average 45 foot tractor trailer rig can load four to eight households, depending who the loader is.

Musashi
2009-Jun-02, 05:18 PM
Well, my mother says that a union is rather rigorous (passing a test, abiding by the rules of the union, etc.), and I don't know where I could find a trade contractor that would hire me.

Didn't know that apprenticeship was a union thing, thanks for the info.

- Maha Vailo

How old are you?

Maha Vailo
2009-Jun-05, 07:41 PM
Musashi: I'm 33. Also, I really don't want to work in the oil industry, just the landscape or grounds maintenance industry. Someplace where I would be home for the weekend.

BigDon: I'm curious as why you would ask if I "was able" to get a CDL. I thought anybody with the desire could get one.

- Maha Vailo

mugaliens
2009-Jun-06, 05:58 AM
Well, my mother says that a union is rather rigorous (passing a test, abiding by the rules of the union, etc.)

If you were a homeowner, would you want to pay someone lots of money to work on your HVAC who wasn't rigorously qualified?


I don't know where I could find a trade contractor that would hire me.

Yellow pages! But don't call - walk into their shop, offer to volunteer, sweep the floors, trash haul, answer phones - whatever it takes to learn the trade.

Show 'em you're hungry! And willing to do (most) anything (legal). That's what it takes to get hired these days.

HenrikOlsen
2009-Jun-06, 03:26 PM
Especially when you're looking for an apprenticeship at 33.

Donnie B.
2009-Jun-08, 04:30 PM
I'm not sure I understand. What do the HVAC, plumbing, or electrical trades have to do with landscaping or groundskeeping?

I mean, the only overlap I can think of is that a groundskeeper might have to work around an HVAC unit, and a landscaper might need to install an irrigation system or low-voltage lighting (but the latter hardly requires an electrician).

Maha Vailo
2009-Jun-09, 05:00 AM
Yellow pages! But don't call - walk into their shop, offer to volunteer, sweep the floors, trash haul, answer phones - whatever it takes to learn the trade.

Show 'em you're hungry! And willing to do (most) anything (legal). That's what it takes to get hired these days.

mugaliens, have you (or anyone else on this board) ever been able to get a job in that way?

- Maha Vailo

PraedSt
2009-Jun-09, 05:21 AM
mugaliens, have you (or anyone else on this board) ever been able to get a job in that way?

- Maha Vailo
I walked into my first job. Actually I walked into several offices before I landed it. Told everyone I'd work for peanuts. But luckily they had grades- so I got paid the 'right' salary anyway.

As for hunger, er--yes. If you want a promotion. The other alternative is to be horribly good at office politics and suck up to the boss. But then you don't make any friends.

mugaliens
2009-Jun-09, 05:44 AM
mugaliens, have you (or anyone else on this board) ever been able to get a job in that way?

- Maha Vailo

By "hungry" I don't mean "desparate." I mean "motivated." What boss doesn't want to hire someone they think will work hard?

And to answer your questions - yes, all of them, but it applied more so to the management / leadership positions I've held.

closetgeek
2009-Jun-09, 01:17 PM
I'm not sure I understand. What do the HVAC, plumbing, or electrical trades have to do with landscaping or groundskeeping?

I mean, the only overlap I can think of is that a groundskeeper might have to work around an HVAC unit, and a landscaper might need to install an irrigation system or low-voltage lighting (but the latter hardly requires an electrician).

I would think the connection is the fact that you can make a good living off of any of those, without having to go to trade school. Most of those jobs are learned through apprenticeship. Also, any one of those trades are not necessarily economy dependant, other than landscaping.