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View Full Version : Closest invention to "True Flying"?



Luckeydavid
2009-Jun-02, 05:40 PM
Is the wingsuit the closest thing we have to flying?

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=1778399

http://www.prelovac.com/vladimir/flying-as-free-as-a-bird


Anybody know about any ongoing research into human flying?

trinitree88
2009-Jun-02, 07:39 PM
Awesome. Awfully close to those rocky outcrops, but truly awesome in their nerve and agility. The only thing that comes closer to real flying is being abducted by Greys with those little neutrino sail backpacks....:shifty::lol:
thanks. pete

aurora
2009-Jun-02, 08:09 PM
I would say hang gliding.

The suits appear to be more like controlled falling.

They look like what camera operators wear when they are filming sky divers.

Edited to add that the Seattle Museum of Flight has the human powered airplane that flew across the English Channel.

Gossamer Albatross (http://www.museumofflight.org/aircraft/maccready-gossamer-albatross-ii)

cjl
2009-Jun-02, 10:40 PM
A wingsuit is a lot more extensive than a camera suit is. With a wingsuit, glide ratios of 3:1 are possible, which is decidedly in the range of gliding rather than falling, at least in my opinion.

EDIT: here's a comparison:

Wingsuit: http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii307/ckarpel_2008/Wingsuit.jpg

Camera suit: http://www.bevsuit.com/images/suit_camera.jpg

Stroller
2009-Jun-03, 08:27 AM
I would say hang gliding.

The suits appear to be more like controlled falling.

They look like what camera operators wear when they are filming sky divers.

Edited to add that the Seattle Museum of Flight has the human powered airplane that flew across the English Channel.

Gossamer Albatross (http://www.museumofflight.org/aircraft/maccready-gossamer-albatross-ii)

The squirrel suit is the nearest thing to 'flying like a squirrel' I've seen. :)

Paragliders can gain height on thermals like large birds can. The ability to gain height is more like 'true flying' as I see it, though the experience is different to the fast arms out action shown in the vids.

The same as the difference between Condor and Peregrine Falcon, but both of those birds 'truly fly'.

Delvo
2009-Jun-03, 10:47 AM
In zoology, flight is defined as using the animal's own energy (muscles) to maintain or gain altitude, so the flight can last as long as the animal's energy supply and essentially any point within range can be the destination (rather than only certain points dictated by glide ratio). Any animal that can't flap and stays in the air only on momentum (instead of applying new energy to stay up) and can only follow a few certain paths (all of them sloped downward) until they collide with something is not flying. It's gliding. Flying squirrels don't have true flight, and these people don't either.

In winged aircraft, the word meanings are essentially the same, except that you replace muscular flapping with engine thrust. If you don't have engines to keep your speed high enough to create at least as much lift as your vehicle's weight, it's not an airplane and it doesn't fly. It's a glider and all it does is glide. After an engine failure, some pilots even use the expression "I've just become a glider".

Think of it this way: at the end of the "flight", can the person/animal/thing turn around and return to the starting point the same way they got to the ending point? If not, then it wasn't a flight.

cjl
2009-Jun-03, 08:10 PM
How about this then?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eS2rjcVcaqQ

Stroller
2009-Jun-03, 09:02 PM
Squirrels will do anything for nuts.
These guys will do anything because they are nuts.

KaiYeves
2009-Jun-03, 11:41 PM
Would the trajectory for a weightless simulation flight count as an invention?

JohnD
2009-Jun-04, 09:18 PM
That Polish gent is way behind the Frenchman, Yves Rossy.
Ok, he uses a fixed wing, but see him fly!

http://www.fusionman.ch/prod/index.html

John

publiusr
2009-Jun-04, 09:37 PM
Truely amazing.

O/T
I have had a strange idea for a sci-fi story involving a slightly phased airship. immune to gravity and air resistance, but still needing a push from throwing things overboard, select 'visible' sails, etc to gradually build up to orbital speed.

KaiYeves
2009-Jun-04, 11:33 PM
That Polish gent is way behind the Frenchman, Yves Rossy.
Ok, he uses a fixed wing, but see him fly!

http://www.fusionman.ch/prod/index.html
I am so honored to share half a name with him.

ravens_cry
2009-Jun-04, 11:54 PM
This (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human-powered_aircraft) is true flying. The only way it would be closer if the the human grew his own wings. It's not as flashy as Jet-Man or the human squirrels, or the jet powered human squirrels, but it's True Flight, by a human.

cjl
2009-Jun-05, 04:15 AM
That Polish gent is way behind the Frenchman, Yves Rossy.
Ok, he uses a fixed wing, but see him fly!

http://www.fusionman.ch/prod/index.html

John
That is impressive, though he uses a lot more efficient wing (and has a correspondingly slower flight speed). Both look fun though :D