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Jason Chapman
2009-Jun-04, 03:59 AM
I have often wondered, when we finally manage to start manned missions to the other planets in our solar system what our first interplanetary spaceship would look like. Given the size of our solar system would conventional rocket ships do the job? I have created this illustration of what we might design in the future.

http://www.scifi-design.com/httpdocs/pictures/wallpapers/artwork/Spaceships/spaceship17.jpg

JonClarke
2009-Jun-04, 09:20 AM
Nice work! That is beautiful. How big is it and what are the components?

cheers

Jon

Jason Chapman
2009-Jun-04, 01:56 PM
Thanks jon
If you look on the side closely there is a space shuttle type carft docked. So as for how big this would be, I'd say it could accomodate up to 500 future colonists. To save fuel it could use the gravitational forces of planets with high gravity to get about, however it would lot be able to travel afster than light, I'd say about half to three quarters of the speed of light.

I designed it several years ago now, and I redesigning a Santa Maria Mark II at the moment. Spaceship designing is a passion of mine. I saw the new Trek film a few weeks ago and was blown away by the new design Enterprise, especially the shuttle bay and the engine room. When you compare it to the original Constitution class or Galaxy class starships, it is a better design by far.
Hereís another space station picture, I designed a few years back also.

http://www.scifi-design.com/httpdocs/pictures/wallpapers/artwork/Spaceships/wallpaper43.jpg

tsumrall
2009-Jun-04, 04:21 PM
Lovely! What are you using to model and render? Rhino and POV-Ray here but I'm not that good at it.

I'm guessing hulls will be carbon built on the nano scale. Perhaps "grown" using the nanomachine, DNA. Given that DNA already knows about building structures the results may be very "life" like. Nanofoam shielding, superdiamond hulls, nanotube wiring, frictionless spinning of life support all grown to spec as a single unit :)

Can't plants remove the carbon from CO2 and build with it? Given that, perhaps plant DNA would be the building block and Mars a nice nursery. Sequoia genes no less :)

Sorry but the convergence of technology astounds me!

Damburger
2009-Jun-04, 04:23 PM
Looks nice. Do you have ideas about the functionality of all the parts of it?

neilzero
2009-Jun-04, 07:11 PM
I agree; Great art work. Oxygen/hydrogen is thought to be adequite, but just barely. Perhaps 1000 feet tall instead of the 300foot rockets that took us to the moon. If we invent the space elevator, parts can be hauled to GEO station, altitude 36,000 kilometer for final assembly. A hundred passenger single stage, space craft powered by oxygen and hydrogen may then be practical to take colonists anywhere in our solar system in a year or two travel time. At the destination the colonists need to rebuild and refuel the space craft if they want to return to Earth, or go somewhere else.
Small unmanned supply rockets need very little fuel, if released at the far end of the space elevator Altitude 90,000 kilometers to 400,000 kilometers to go anywhere in the solar system in ten years or a bit less. There are lots of great posts at the forum at www.liftport.com Neil

Tucson_Tim
2009-Jun-04, 07:30 PM
Beautiful! But where is the Nina and the Pinta?

PraedSt
2009-Jun-04, 07:48 PM
Where are the lasers?

Tucson_Tim
2009-Jun-04, 08:06 PM
It reminds me of the Orion-drive spaceship Messiah, from the movie Deep Impact, which was, for all practical purposes, an interplanetary vessel. Nice work Jason - you've got some talent there.

mugaliens
2009-Jun-05, 07:03 AM
Definately very talented and beautiful designs!

ravens_cry
2009-Jun-05, 08:30 AM
Very nice art, but one nit pick. The Earth is round. Though you have a great atmosphere effect and texture in place, at that altitude a certain amount of curvature would definitely be visible. I am sorry it is just visually bugging me.

Jason Chapman
2009-Jun-05, 02:21 PM
Very nice art, but one nit pick. The Earth is round. Though you have a great atmosphere effect and texture in place, at that altitude a certain amount of curvature would definitely be visible. I am sorry it is just visually bugging me.


You absolutely righ there raven, that's my one problem at the moment I cannot do decent planetary atmospheres, but I am practicing. I use Bryce for the backgrounds and 3D max for the models, I'm not as good as some of those game designers I've seen. I am working hard on new designs at the moment.
Many thanks for your comments
JC

TinFoilHat
2009-Jun-05, 03:31 PM
Needs radiator panels.

ravens_cry
2009-Jun-06, 06:48 AM
I think the website below may aid you in your quest for scientifically accurate space craft designs.
http://www.projectrho.com/rocket/index.html
Cheers.

Damburger
2009-Jun-06, 08:20 AM
I think the website below may aid you in your quest for scientifically accurate space craft designs.
http://www.projectrho.com/rocket/index.html
Cheers.

Generally a good site (although I have a few quibbles; the author establishes certain 'facts' largely through Socratic dialogue, which is worthless for producing facts, and then implies anyone who disagrees with his conclusions is 'disrespecting science')

Jason Chapman
2009-Jun-07, 05:40 PM
I think the website below may aid you in your quest for scientifically accurate space craft designs.
http://www.projectrho.com/rocket/index.html
Cheers.

Wow tor that Raven, really cool designs

Launch window
2009-Jun-10, 03:09 PM
What software do people use for those scifi images? I would love to get my hands on a good one of those art packages

Jason Chapman
2009-Jun-10, 10:27 PM
What software do people use for those scifi images? I would love to get my hands on a good one of those art packages

Lots of different programs out there, 3D Max, Maya, Soft Image, if you hunt around you can find free software with different computer magazines.

PraedSt
2009-Jun-10, 11:16 PM
I designed it several years ago now, and I redesigning a Santa Maria Mark II at the moment. Spaceship designing is a passion of mine. Got any more? How's the SM MII coming along?

Jason Chapman
2009-Jun-11, 10:59 PM
The Santa Maria 2 is still in its infancy stages of design at the moment. Here's a picture. I'm putting four cylindrical tanks on the back which will be used for fuel and recycled elements. Any ideas or input will be welcome.

http://www.scifi-design.com/backgrounds/spare/SM2.jpg

I'll say one thing for you people on this forum, you've really made me sit down and think about stuff when I design spaceships. I do have a website www.scifi-design.com I haven't mentioned this before because I don't want to come across as a spammer.

PraedSt
2009-Jun-12, 06:37 AM
This is a chemical rocket? And the module at the end is the combustion chamber? How do you get the fuel or combustion gases to the outer 4 bells?

I love your site by the way. It looks a bit like a computer game. :)

And you have some spaceships/stations that look thoroughly evil- like the star shaped space station for example. And are those sea urchin things mines, or is it a battle fleet?

Any chance of a bit of text explaining each picture? Would be appreciated...

Jason Chapman
2009-Jun-12, 11:00 AM
This is a chemical rocket? And the module at the end is the combustion chamber? How do you get the fuel or combustion gases to the outer 4 bells?

Any chance of a bit of text explaining each picture? Would be appreciated...

I did design the SM1 to have conventional rocket engines, as itís solely restricted to solar system planetary exploration, more than like our own (SSPE)

http://www.scifi-design.com/backgrounds/spare/SM-drive.jpg

The SM2 would be a deep space expedition vehicle (DSEV) Main function would be to chart star systems, and study nebulas and other elements. When travelling within a solar system the Fusion rockets would be its main source of propulsion, as with the SM1 speed within a solar system would be approaching the speed of light, I suppose it all depends on the size of the solar system. But travelling between stars probably requires something a little bit more exotic. I like the idea of a wormhole creation unit (WCU) however thatís going to require a lot of thought. As you can see Iíve added a fusion input line from the tanks to the rocket boosters. The tanks themselves are connected to the main fusion reactor via a central column which has a fusion distributer which regulates and distributes fuel to the rockets and energy to the front section of the ship, where Iím considering putting the WCU. (Think I need a lie down after explaining that)

Iím glad you liked the website, although you have given me an idea to create a technical section explaining a bit about the ships I design. I created the site in a way that itís totally visual, no text anywhere, except the homepage to tell people what I am up to. Iíll carry on with the SM2 and keep you updated.
Thanks
JC

PraedSt
2009-Jun-12, 12:17 PM
Iím glad you liked the website, although you have given me an idea to create a technical section explaining a bit about the ships I design.We like our technical details here. ;)

For example (:D), you have fuel going straight from the tanks to the outside nacelles. It bypasses the reactor. I'm not sure how that would work.

I think you either need 4 lines from the reactor to the nacelles, transporting the reaction gases, or you need 5 reactors- a large central one, and 4 surrounding ones.

Or maybe you already have 4 very small reactors in the nacelles? Or are they simple chemical boosters, i.e non-nuclear? If so, ignore this post!

Jason Chapman
2009-Jun-13, 04:13 PM
We like our technical details here. ;)

For example (:D), you have fuel going straight from the tanks to the outside nacelles. It bypasses the reactor. I'm not sure how that would work.

I think you either need 4 lines from the reactor to the nacelles, transporting the reaction gases, or you need 5 reactors- a large central one, and 4 surrounding ones.

Or maybe you already have 4 very small reactors in the nacelles? Or are they simple chemical boosters, i.e non-nuclear? If so, ignore this post!

I have just produced these diagrams for the fusion drive unit. As you can see the fuel input line feeds directly into the fusion distributer, drawing fuel/power directly from the main fusion drive. All four tanks are connected to a release valve which can be filled directly from the fusion unit.

http://www.scifi-design.com/backgrounds/spare/SM-drive4.jpg

As for the main drive system, I have used a combination of a particle accelerator and a nuclear fusion reactor. Last year there was a bit of hype about CERN and how their particle collider could create a black hole effectively ending everything. Fortunately it never happened, my particle collider is a lot smaller than CERNís probably a few hundred feet across, but cross linked with the nuclear fusion reactor will be used to create a partial wormhole, which instead of folding space, compresses it, allowing the ship to travel through a stable temporal vortex, and out the other end. Depending where you want to go in the galaxy travel in the vortex will vary. (I think anyway)

http://www.scifi-design.com/backgrounds/spare/SM-drive3.jpg

I am currently designing the main crew section. I'll keep you updated.

PraedSt
2009-Jun-13, 06:28 PM
I have just produced these diagrams for the fusion drive unit. As you can see the fuel input line feeds directly into the fusion distributer, drawing fuel/power directly from the main fusion drive. All four tanks are connected to a release valve which can be filled directly from the fusion unit.Yeah, that's much better.


Last year there was a bit of hype about CERN and how their particle collider could create a black hole effectively ending everything. Fortunately it never happened:lol:


my particle collider is a lot smaller than CERNís probably a few hundred feet across, but cross linked with the nuclear fusion reactor will be used to create a partial wormholeHey! I thought you were putting the WCU at the front of the ship?

John Jaksich
2009-Jun-13, 07:05 PM
I love this work--it so creative!!!!

Jason Chapman
2009-Jun-13, 07:19 PM
Hey! I thought you were putting the WCU at the front of the ship?

I am, don't worry I almost think I know what I'm doing

Jason Chapman
2009-Jun-19, 07:37 PM
I have just done a little bit more to the SM MKII. I have added a crew module together with the Worm hole generating unit on the front, which is powered through the central column which is connected up to the main fusion reactor at the back. The crew compliment for this would be around 30 to 40.

http://www.scifi-design.com/backgrounds/spare/SM-MKII.jpg

Shielding for this ship would be an intense electromagnetic field capable for dissolving any micro-particles which travelling at high speeds could cause significant damage. As far as larger objects are concerned they would act like an opposing magnet and be propelled away from the ship.

I still havenít made up my mind about scale yet, but if I were to guess Iíd say about 400 feet in length, which is why I have put it up against the Saturn 5 rocket which is nearly 400 feet in length. A ship like this would have to be constructed entirely in orbit, and by the time something like this could be possible the parts would be manufactured on the Moon or even Mars.
As far as maximum distance this ship could go, Iíd say about a thousand light years out, to a place called HH32 (It does exist honestly) That would take well within exploratory distance of the Pleiades cluster which is made up of a large amount of stars. There could be a chance of finding planets around many of these stars.
Of course the development of wormhole drive systems would make it possible for ships of a later designs to go much further.

I do plane to add more detail, donít know when that will be though.

http://www.scifi-design.com/backgrounds/spare/SM-MKI.jpg

As far as the Santa Maria MKI is concerned, I believe it could be possible to build something like this within 100 years, depending on treaties signed by our governments on the use of nuclear powered rockets. If we are to cover vast distances in space then we have to look beyond conventional rocket fuel and go nuclear. Iím really hoping that when the 40th Anniversary of the Apollo Moon Landing comes around President Obama with make some sort of Kennedy style speech to fire the imagination of the Human race.

publiusr
2009-Jun-19, 09:00 PM
Iím really hoping that when the 40th Anniversary of the Apollo Moon Landing comes around President Obama with make some sort of Kennedy style speech to fire the imagination of the Human race.

Don't count on it.


I do love that art! I am going to link this page to www.starshipmodeler.net

Crazy Tom
2009-Jun-20, 03:27 PM
ON the subject of your magnetic field, you would first have to ionize them (probably with a laser) before the magnetic field could push them away. However given that you use a FTL drive, I imagine you wouldn't need much shielding, since your ship will be able to go more or less anywhere without traversing the space between points.

While Atomic Rocket is a good site for "less advanced" spaceship creation, Orion's Arm offers more information on more theoretical stuff. Below a link straight to their page on spacecraft shielding.

http://www.orionsarm.com/ships/shielding.html

eburacum45
2009-Jun-20, 05:51 PM
The old OA site should be completely superceded by the new site by Tranquility Day this year
here's the propulsion pages from the new site
http://eg.orionsarm.com/xcms.php?r=oaeg-view-topic&egtop_uid=49350e2d34113

Jason Chapman
2009-Jun-28, 07:21 AM
I was watching a really interesting documentary last night on the Discovery Channel entitled ‘Aircraft That Never Flew’ They were going on about a US government research project into Nuclear powered bombers, set up in the 1940s. Unfortunately they couldn’t solve the problem of shielding the crew against radiation so the program was abandoned. It got me thinking about what I designed, and suggested the theory of nuclear powered engines on space craft.
I wonder if the US government did abandon the project, or did they pursue a classified research project, it’s certainly a plausible thought.

Nuclear Engine Powered Aircraft (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_aircraft)

danscope
2009-Jul-02, 08:34 PM
That project came to a very very heavy and dangerous dead end.
At least they did it back when it didn't cost as much as it would have today.
Fin. Kaput. End event.

Jason Chapman
2009-Nov-16, 12:04 PM
Yes Iím back,
So sorry I have been away so long, been busy these last few months getting Married, and setting up a family. Anyhow I have a few new ideas on the drawing board at the moment and will be posting them soon.

BetaDust
2009-Nov-16, 04:18 PM
So sorry I have been away so long, been busy these last few months getting Married, and setting up a family.

That is great to hear!
Congratulations on your getting Married Mr. Chapman!

Also, I think your graphics are fantastic, I'd love to see more.

Kind regards,

--Dennis

Hop_David
2009-Nov-16, 04:28 PM
To save fuel it could use the gravitational forces of planets with high gravity to get about, however it would lot be able to travel afster than light, I'd say about half to three quarters of the speed of light.

Nice illustration!

I believe the first interplanetary ships will use Hohmann orbits. The delta V needed is only a minute fraction of the speed of light.

For example delta V needed for Trans Mars Insertion (TMI) from LEO (Low Earth Orbit)
http://clowder.net/hop/TMI/LEOtoTMI.jpg is about 3.6 km/sec.

Speed of light is about 300,000 km/sec.

Early interplanetary ships might use liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen as the propelent. The exhaust velocity of this propellent is about 4.46 km/sec. The ratio of propellent mass to payload mass can be determined with this equation:

Mass propellent/Mass payload = e^(delta V/exhaust velocity) - 1

A large part of the early interplanetary ships will likely be propellent and tanks to contain propellent.

Fusion drives and substantial fractions of light speed is over kill for moving about our solar system. It would be good for interstellar transportation though. For example a trip to Alpha Centauri.

bebe7
2009-Nov-16, 06:53 PM
I have often wondered, when we finally manage to start manned missions to the other planets in our solar system what our first interplanetary spaceship would look like. Given the size of our solar system would conventional rocket ships do the job? I have created this illustration of what we might design in the future.

http://www.scifi-design.com/httpdocs/pictures/wallpapers/artwork/Spaceships/spaceship17.jpg

Stunning...save me a seat please.

wonderful...bravo Jason.

bebe7
2009-Nov-16, 07:08 PM
I have just produced these diagrams for the fusion drive unit. As you can see the fuel input line feeds directly into the fusion distributer, drawing fuel/power directly from the main fusion drive. All four tanks are connected to a release valve which can be filled directly from the fusion unit.

http://www.scifi-design.com/backgrounds/spare/SM-drive4.jpg

As for the main drive system, I have used a combination of a particle accelerator and a nuclear fusion reactor. Last year there was a bit of hype about CERN and how their particle collider could create a black hole effectively ending everything. Fortunately it never happened, my particle collider is a lot smaller than CERNís probably a few hundred feet across, but cross linked with the nuclear fusion reactor will be used to create a partial wormhole, which instead of folding space, compresses it, allowing the ship to travel through a stable temporal vortex, and out the other end. Depending where you want to go in the galaxy travel in the vortex will vary. (I think anyway)

http://www.scifi-design.com/backgrounds/spare/SM-drive3.jpg

I am currently designing the main crew section. I'll keep you updated.

Here's a good diagram/schemtic of the Bussard Ramjet

http://privat.bahnhof.se/wb671350/graphics/bussard.jpg

Enjoy

Jason Chapman
2009-Nov-16, 10:48 PM
Thanks for the messages guys, I'll get back to you in the morning UK time.

IsaacKuo
2009-Nov-16, 11:01 PM
I would expect interplanetary spaceships to have some aerodynamic features. Aerobraking, aerocapture, and aeromaneuvering will be important--they can save you a lot of fuel and expense.

I expect manned spacecraft to use primarily chemical rockets along with aerobraking and refueling from orbital fuel depots. These unmanned fuel tanker satellites might use ion engines to slowly ship themselves to the desired orbits (in elliptical planetary orbit, as well as LEO/LMO).

The manned spacecraft would have smooth exteriors designed for aerobraking and/or aeromaneuvers. The former would favor a stubby flying saucer shape--like the aeroshell of the old Viking lander. The main rocket thrusters would be clustered in the center rear, far away from the airstream. The spacecraft might have retractable solar panels and/or communications dishes.

The unmanned tankers would look more like what you've got--a central body flanked by large solar panel "wings" and central electric thrusters. Something that looks like Dawn, but much bigger.

publiusr
2009-Nov-17, 12:08 AM
I would expect interplanetary spaceships to have some aerodynamic features. Aerobraking, aerocapture, and aeromaneuvering will be important--they can save you a lot of fuel and expense.

Agreed. In much the same way some wanted to refuel a Rombus core to serve as an interplanetary spaceship:http://www.astronautix.com/graphics/r/rombus.gif

You could use a concept like the Bono Saucer. This thing would be large enough to serve as a base when empty--plenty of floorspace:

http://www.astronautix.com/craft/bonaucer.htm,

traceur
2009-Nov-17, 02:55 PM
nice artwork :)

but since it looks like its designed to be scientifically valid, i have a question:
in what directions do the compartment floors face when the ship is under inertia?

mugaliens
2009-Nov-19, 07:54 PM
"Wormhole Generator" -:confused:

Nice, science fiction, but I've thoroughly enjoyed your handiwork - very plausible.

Have you considered working in Hollywood? They need people like you!

Jason Chapman
2009-Nov-22, 08:40 AM
I'd love to work in Hollywood, designing spaceships for science fiction.

Jason Chapman
2009-Nov-22, 08:49 AM
nice artwork :)

but since it looks like its designed to be scientifically valid, i have a question:
in what directions do the compartment floors face when the ship is under inertia?

Bugger! Now you have caught me out, to busy thinking about the engines on this thing to bother about other stuff.

It has often been theorised that to create artificial gravity you need to make something spin. A typical example would be the space station on 2001. However, and I don't mean to go off on a tangent here I have often questioned the use of artificial gravity on science fiction type spaceships like the USS Enterprise, I know its only science fiction and people rarely question such things, but I wonder if its possible to simulate a gravatational field affecting all objects with a mass without have to make the ship spin.

Looks like its back to the drawing board for this one.

bebe7 been trying to send you a PM sorry I haven't replied, I keep getting my pms sent back to me.

Jason Chapman
2009-Dec-11, 08:46 AM
So here we go with another madcap spaceship from yours truly. Actually itís more of a mining vessel than anything. There has been plenty of talk of mining the moon, asteroids Mars and other celestial bodies which is all very well for minerals and such.

However say in the distant future we start to colonise other planets in other solar systems. They will probably have moons and things to mine. However not all planets have natural gas to extract, so what do you do? You get it from the nearest gas nebula thatís what. As we know nebulas have large amounts of gas which can prove very useful if you have a planet to terraform. This planet may be in early stages of development and naturally will take a few million years before single cell organisms started to form, so you help it along with the necessary gas from a nebula, making the planet habitable within a few years, depending on where it is and whether or not itís still being bombarded with meteors.

This model is still in its early stages of development and I am working quickly to get it looking more like a mining vessel. Iíll have more soon.


http://www.scifi-design.com/backgrounds/spare/nebula-scoop.jpg

danscope
2009-Dec-11, 11:43 PM
Yep. gas nebulae. trouble is that gas is so rarefied, so thin that a bathroom
full of that gas would fill a balloon the size of Manhattan, although that probably is too concentrated for the comparison. Hmmm....

Hop_David
2009-Dec-12, 06:53 PM
However say in the distant future we start to colonise other planets in other solar systems. They will probably have moons and things to mine. However not all planets have natural gas to extract, so what do you do? You get it from the nearest gas nebula thatís what. As we know nebulas have large amounts of gas which can prove very useful if you have a planet to terraform.

The nearest gas nebulas are 450 and 1500 light years away.
http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/cosmic_classroom/ask_astronomer/faq/nebula.shtml

As another poster noted, the gas nebulas aren't very dense.

Your images are nice. But your knowledge of astronomy and celestial mechanics are still far short of your artistic skills.

Craigboy
2009-Dec-15, 01:08 AM
I have often wondered, when we finally manage to start manned missions to the other planets in our solar system what our first interplanetary spaceship would look like. Given the size of our solar system would conventional rocket ships do the job? I have created this illustration of what we might design in the future.

http://www.scifi-design.com/httpdocs/pictures/wallpapers/artwork/Spaceships/spaceship17.jpg
Is it just me or does it kind of phallic. I'm not trying to rude or offensive but the top capsule (furthest left) kind makes it look that way.

danscope
2009-Dec-15, 01:55 AM
They do the job. It remains a simple question of time to get there/fuel .
Oh...you want to return after? More fuel. Oh...you want to slow down, land somewhere.....for a while...., and now you want to return to earth ?
More time, more fuel. Oh... you want to eat and drink while you go there? more fuel, more food. Oh.... you need spare parts? No stores around,eh?
Guess what... more fuel, more time.
" I think we're going to need a bigger boat." Chief Brody

Murphy
2009-Dec-15, 11:54 PM
Is it just me or does it kind of phallic. I'm not trying to rude or offensive but the top capsule (furthest left) kind makes it look that way.

Hehe :lol:, yes a lot of spaceship designs do have a tendency to end up looking like that. I know myself when I try to design spacecraft, they often become rather phallic, I don't think it has anything to do with Freudian psychology, but just certain engineering principles tend to lead that way.

I remember last year my sister was doing a course on Feminism in University and in one of her books is a page of pictures of rockets, missiles and guns, etc, the feminist interpretation being that men like big phallic objects (presumably subconsciously). Now I've got nothing against feminism, but personally I think that line of thought is ludicrous and misinformed. Those objects are designed that way because of reasons of Aerodynamics and structural strength, not fetishistic psychology. At least that's my opinion anyway.

danscope
2009-Dec-16, 12:15 AM
Well, they tried the barn door and the triangular wheel. Neither one worked well for transportation, although the triangular wheel had one less bump so it was supposed to give a better ride.

IsaacKuo
2009-Dec-16, 01:59 AM
Hehe :lol:, yes a lot of spaceship designs do have a tendency to end up looking like that. I know myself when I try to design spacecraft, they often become rather phallic, I don't think it has anything to do with Freudian psychology, but just certain engineering principles tend to lead that way.
When I design spacecraft, they very rarely become phallic. My designs tend to be utterly dominated by the specific engineering needs for the spacecraft mechanisms and design purposes.

For instance, solar powered vehicles tend to have two huge rectangular "wings" flanking a relatively small central body. Or aeroramjet and aeroscoop vehicles tend to be dominated by a large frontal funnel. Or an interplanetary liner tends to look something like a thick flying saucer (like the Viking aeroshell). Or a starship needs to be a very large superconducting loop, with various modules strung along it like beads on a necklace.

It all depends on the hardware required to best do what the spacecraft is supposed to do.

Craigboy
2009-Dec-20, 01:35 AM
Hehe :lol:, yes a lot of spaceship designs do have a tendency to end up looking like that. I know myself when I try to design spacecraft, they often become rather phallic, I don't think it has anything to do with Freudian psychology, but just certain engineering principles tend to lead that way.

I remember last year my sister was doing a course on Feminism in University and in one of her books is a page of pictures of rockets, missiles and guns, etc, the feminist interpretation being that men like big phallic objects (presumably subconsciously). Now I've got nothing against feminism, but personally I think that line of thought is ludicrous and misinformed. Those objects are designed that way because of reasons of Aerodynamics and structural strength, not fetishistic psychology. At least that's my opinion anyway.
ha ha