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Jason Chapman
2009-Jun-04, 04:16 AM
I have often wondered why NASA have yet to launch a remote lunar rover to the moon. They have launched a couple to Mars, and although its great to see the Red Planet, it would be nice to see fressh images of the lunar landscape, those Apollo moon shots look a little dated now.

BetaDust
2009-Jun-04, 06:20 AM
Why would NASA want to send an unmanned rover to the moon?
They are currenly working on sending manned rovers back there by +/- 2020.

Vision for Space Exploration (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vision_for_Space_Exploration)
Constellation program (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Constellation)

slang
2009-Jun-04, 07:13 AM
I have often wondered why NASA have yet to launch a remote lunar rover to the moon.

Limited budget, and other, more interesting missions. Like:


They have launched a couple to Mars, and although its great to see the Red Planet, it would be nice to see fressh images of the lunar landscape, those Apollo moon shots look a little dated now.

That's because they are a little dated now. :) Seriously though, many of the photographs taken by the astronauts are very sharp high quality images of the moon's surface. I don't see why fresh images of lunar soil would be prettier, but there would be plenty scientific value.

And what BetaDust said.

01101001
2009-Jun-04, 07:36 AM
NASA is offshoring the robotic moon rovers.

Report: China to Launch Moon Rover in 2012 (http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/china_moon_040322.html)
India to develope moon rover (http://indianaerospace.wordpress.com/2007/08/21/india-to-develope-moon-rover/)
Lunar Rover for [Japan] SELENE-B Mission (http://sciencelinks.jp/j-east/article/200314/000020031403A0410455.php)

Or, passing on the opportunity because manned rovers are so much more fun.

novaderrik
2009-Jun-04, 08:02 AM
I have often wondered why NASA have yet to launch a remote lunar rover to the moon. They have launched a couple to Mars, and although its great to see the Red Planet, it would be nice to see fressh images of the lunar landscape, those Apollo moon shots look a little dated now.
what do you think has changed on the moon in the last 37 years that makes the Apollo shots look a little dated?

djellison
2009-Jun-04, 08:42 AM
I have often wondered why NASA have yet to launch a remote lunar rover to the moon.

Money, lack of.

JustAFriend
2009-Jun-04, 01:45 PM
From "The Right Stuff": "No bucks, no Buck Rodgers"

Complain to your Congressman.

Some of them were born before the airplane and they DONT WANT to spend any money on that silly outer-spacey stuff.

....you got to push them or put new people in that will actually get us working on it.

Jason Chapman
2009-Jun-04, 02:08 PM
Thanks for the replies.
I get what you guys are saying about, the fact that we're sending a manned expedition in the next decade, or there's not much point because nothing would have changed. However the Apollo missions only covered a tiny part of the moon, there are plenty of other places which I think are interesting, including the dark side which we never get to see. I know satellites have orbited the moon mapping out its surface, which enable us to create 3D models of the landscape, but it would be nice to see some HD video. And added to that one of the most important reasons, is to inspire a whole new generation of people.

novaderrik
2009-Jun-04, 07:07 PM
i don't think sending people to the far side of the moon would be as inspiring to the kids of today as it was to send people to the near side in the late 60's- to most kids, the real moon is relatively boring compared to the other worlds they visit every day on their XBox or PS3. i'm not saying it wouldn't have an effect, but it wouldn't grab the attention as much of the population as it did 40 years ago.

Tucson_Tim
2009-Jun-04, 07:17 PM
there are plenty of other places which I think are interesting, including the dark side which we never get to see.

Just a note: it's not the dark side. Far side, yes.

It is the dark side when we see it as the Full Moon. It is the "completely lit" side when it is at the New Moon phase. (I'm ignoring libration and nutation here . . .)

KaiYeves
2009-Jun-04, 11:22 PM
Because the Russians already did that forty years ago.


i don't think sending people to the far side of the moon would be as inspiring to the kids of today as it was to send people to the near side in the late 60's- to most kids, the real moon is relatively boring compared to the other worlds they visit every day on their XBox or PS3. i'm not saying it wouldn't have an effect, but it wouldn't grab the attention as much of the population as it did 40 years ago.
That's my generation you're talking about, buster, and it hurts.

Tucson_Tim
2009-Jun-04, 11:25 PM
That's my generation you're talking about, buster, and it hurts.

I didn't see a post by that guy. Are you sure you have his user ID correct?

JonClarke
2009-Jun-04, 11:32 PM
NASA did consider remote controlled rovers in the 60s. There was the small Surveyor Block II rovers (http://utenti.lycos.it/paoloulivi/surrover.html) and the larger Prospector (http://history.nasa.gov/SP-4009/v1p2c.htm - see April 20 entry) but the first was overtaken by events and the second offered little that Apollo did not.

Jon

novaderrik
2009-Jun-05, 03:30 AM
Because the Russians already did that forty years ago.


That's my generation you're talking about, buster, and it hurts.

the world is a different place than it was back then, and those of us that care at all about anything space related are a minority. ask a few random members of your generation- outside of your normal social circles- what they know about the space program, and what they think of the two rovers we've currently got on Mars. ask them about the shuttle program, and the system that is going to replace it.
also ask them how they'd feel about sending people back to the moon.
then, at the end, ask then what they thought if the American Idol finale and what they thought about the latest Hannah Montana album/movie/tv show/whatever she's famous for.

NEOWatcher
2009-Jun-05, 12:20 PM
the world is a different place than it was back then, and those of us that care at all about anything space related are a minority...
I saw a good example of that this morning. The morning's local quiz on TV news was (paraphrased) "if the sun went dark, how long before we would know". Choices Immediately, 8min, 8hr, 8days.
Out of 3 TV personalities and the contestent, they all struggled seemed like they had no clue, and nobody got it even by chance.
And I thought that would be among one of the easiest astronomical questions.

KaiYeves
2009-Jun-05, 08:33 PM
My friends don't care as much as I do, but they do care. Even the ones who want to be fashion designers know about space tourism and plan on taking trips into space when they're rich enough.

I can't claim to speak for everyone born in the '90s, but do take umbrage when adults call us apathetic.

novaderrik
2009-Jun-06, 12:45 AM
My friends don't care as much as I do, but they do care. Even the ones who want to be fashion designers know about space tourism and plan on taking trips into space when they're rich enough.

I can't claim to speak for everyone born in the '90s, but do take umbrage when adults call us apathetic.
how many people in your age group have ever used the word "umbrage" in a sentence?
don't take this the wrong way- but i don't think you are a typical example of your age group. in fact, i don't think that most people on this site would be considered "typical" for their age groups- myself included. most people just don't really care about space or what we have people doing up there every day. the only time they think about it is when it's on the news for more than a day or two- and that only really ever happens when something goes horribly wrong.
when was the last time you saw anything about Spirit or Opportunity on the news? for me, it was a couple of weeks ago when Spirit got stuck. before that, i think the only time they really talked about them on a daily basis was back when they first landed with a couple of mentions whenever they are looking for money to extend the missions.

KaiYeves
2009-Jun-06, 12:53 AM
how many people in your age group have ever used the word "umbrage" in a sentence?
Does referring to the Harry Potter character count? If not, probably only those who have taken Latin. (Which is still a large enough percentile for there to be state-mandated tests)