PDA

View Full Version : Distance to the edge of the Universe



Chief
2009-Jun-08, 10:23 PM
If it takes 13 billion light years for the most distant light to reach us, and the object that emitted that light kept on moving away with the expansion of the universe during the time the light was traveling in our direction, wouldn't that indicate that the object is now a great deal further away now than when it was originally emitted. So when someone indicates that the edge of the universe is so many light years distant, that was the distance at that time, not what it is now. Yes/No? :confused:

Ampatent
2009-Jun-08, 10:28 PM
From what I know, yes. But seeing as we haven't entered the age of interstellar travel it doesn't really help to calculate distances and times in terms of the actual universe but rather as we perceive them here on Earth.

Spaceman Spiff
2009-Jun-08, 10:30 PM
A commonly asked question.
Go here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observable_universe), and you might also find this (http://www.atlasoftheuniverse.com/redshift.html) and this (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distance_measures_%28cosmology%29) to be of interest.

undidly
2009-Jun-10, 01:31 AM
If it takes 13 billion light years for the most distant light to reach us, and the object that emitted that light kept on moving away with the expansion of the universe during the time the light was traveling in our direction, wouldn't that indicate that the object is now a great deal further away now than when it was originally emitted. So when someone indicates that the edge of the universe is so many light years distant, that was the distance at that time, not what it is now. Yes/No? :confused:

The light from that object also goes the other way.
It must be twice as far away so is it still in the universe?.
Look behind yourself.Can you see it yet?.
The edge of the universe is like the edge of the Earth.
Jump off the edge if you want to get a look at all those turtles.