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lostgalaxy
2009-Jun-26, 10:45 AM
Hi,

Hello everyone. It's my first question here. I joined the forum because I have a question.

Is there any particular research / book on wandering objects in the universe beside articles? I'm interested in clusters of stars that are remnants of an ancient galaxy. Also I wonder if a wandering black hole may one day turn around and go back to it's home galaxy?

My interest in these matters is not purely science. I believe stars are connected with human souls. Understanding them may shed good light into human lives.

Many thanks in advance and all the best to everyone.

Lost galaxy

trinitree88
2009-Jun-26, 04:03 PM
Hi,

Hello everyone. It's my first question here. I joined the forum because I have a question.

Is there any particular research / book on wandering objects in the universe beside articles? I'm interested in clusters of stars that are remnants of an ancient galaxy. Also I wonder if a wandering black hole may one day turn around and go back to it's home galaxy?

My interest in these matters is not purely science. I believe stars are connected with human souls. Understanding them may shed good light into human lives.

Many thanks in advance and all the best to everyone.

Lost galaxy


Lostgalaxy. Hi.Welcome to baut. Your question with regards to the BH returning to it's host galaxy is not forbidden, and therefore may occur in the short term, though contemporary thinking is that everything will eventually separate...(don't hold your breath).
The second part is more appropriate for the forum Off Topic Babbling...as it is not science and the forum does have rules about that...(please read them). Many philosophical members will be happy to chat with you there, and I wish I could say that everything I ever knew fit neatly into the science paradigms.....but life has a lot of surprises for everybody. Good luck. Pete

Cougar
2009-Jun-26, 07:59 PM
I'm interested in clusters of stars that are remnants of an ancient galaxy.

Then you'll want to study up on star clusters (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_cluster), what they are, where they appear, etc.


Our galaxy has about 150 globular clusters [which are 'clusters of stars'], some of which may have been captured from small galaxies disrupted by the Milky Way, as seems to be the case for the globular cluster M79. Some galaxies are much richer in globulars: the giant elliptical galaxy M87 contains over a thousand.

kleindoofy
2009-Jun-26, 08:21 PM
... I believe stars are connected with human souls. ...
Interesting.

Can you post some empirical data?

Jeff Root
2009-Jun-26, 08:42 PM
Everything in the Universe is "wandering". Every galaxy, every star cluster,
every star, every planet, every bit of dust, every atom wanders around.

No black hole is known to have left any galaxy, although it is not impossible
for that to happen. It would be a fairly rare event, and extremely difficult
for us to observe. Some individual stars are seen to have been thrown out
of galaxies in supernova explosions and in galaxy "collisions". More easily
seen, and apparently more frequent, are mergers of small galaxies, forming
larger galaxies. Such mergers cannot be undone, although individual stars
can be thrown out by later galaxy "collisions".

Very roughly half the material in a protoplanetary disk gets thrown out of
a forming solar system as the planets form and clear the disk away. It will
never return. Some of it will eventually end up in new molecular clouds,
and become part of other solar systems.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

lostgalaxy
2009-Jun-26, 11:04 PM
Interesting.

Can you post some empirical data?

It's a matter of belief you know. :)

lostgalaxy
2009-Jun-26, 11:05 PM
Then you'll want to study up on star clusters (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_cluster), what they are, where they appear, etc.


Our galaxy has about 150 globular clusters [which are 'clusters of stars'], some of which may have been captured from small galaxies disrupted by the Milky Way, as seems to be the case for the globular cluster M79. Some galaxies are much richer in globulars: the giant elliptical galaxy M87 contains over a thousand.


Thanks Cougar!

lostgalaxy
2009-Jun-26, 11:07 PM
Thanks friends.

PetersCreek
2009-Jun-27, 12:37 AM
lostgalaxy,

Welcome to BAUT. Please understand that posts with links made (or quoted) by new users are held in a moderation queue for approval, so you won't see them appear right away. This is just an anti-spambot measure and once you get a few posts under your belt it won't be a bother any more. I've taken the liberty of deleting one duplicate post that you made.