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Mr_Holes
2009-Jun-28, 05:38 PM
Greetings everybody,

this is my first post and wanted to say hello and ask a question. :)

I was wondering about the big bang.
This might seem like a strange question but could the big bang have been like a big firecrackerroll ? Instead of 1 explosion an enormous amount of explosions where the center of the universe is ? That the effects of those explosions travel like pressure waves back and forth even today in the virtual particle realm ?
Could it be that we may just see only the last explosion in our realm?

The reason why i am asking is pure interest about what would be at the center of our universe.

I am apologizing for my english, it is not perfect.
Thank you very much in advance.

hhEb09'1
2009-Jun-28, 05:53 PM
Welcome to BAUT, Mr Holes! I've changed the title of your question to "A question about the form of the big bang", maybe it might attract more attention.

Mr_Holes
2009-Jun-28, 05:58 PM
Thank you very much :shifty:

oops...

Fiery Phoenix
2009-Jun-28, 06:13 PM
Welcome to BAUT, sir!

While I can't say I know a good answer to your question, I wanted to point out that the Big Bang was not really an explosion. It was an expansion of space itself; an instantaneous expansion that turned a tiny dot into the Universe we see today.

01101001
2009-Jun-28, 06:52 PM
[...] could the big bang have been like a big firecrackerroll ? Instead of 1 explosion an enormous amount of explosions where the center of the universe is ?

I think I will apply the same answer I recently gave another beginner:

Welcome.

One of the FAQs, in the FAQs topic (http://www.bautforum.com/space-astronomy-questions-answers/22865-faqs-resources-web.html), top of the Q&A section, is Sean Carrol's Cosmology Primer FAQ (http://preposterousuniverse.com/writings/cosmologyprimer/faq.html). You might want to glance through that for an introduction. And the whole primer is good. Enjoy the other FAQs, too.


What is the universe expanding into?
As far as we know, the universe isn't expanding "into" anything. When we say the universe is expanding, we have a very precise operational concept in mind: the amount of space in between distant galaxies is growing. (Individual galaxies are not growing, as they are bound together by gravity.) But the universe is all there is (again, as far as we know), so there's nothing outside into which it could be expanding. This is hard to visualize, since we are used to thinking of objects as being located somewhere in space; but the universe includes all of space.

===

Also there, find:


Does the universe have a center?
No. Our observable universe looks basically the same from the point of view of any observer. We see galaxies moving away from us in all directions, but an astronomer living in any one of those galaxies would also see all the galaxies (including our own) moving away from them. In particular, the Big Bang is not an explosion that happened at some particular point in space; according to the Big Bang model, the entire universe came into existence expanding at every point all at once.

Ken G
2009-Jun-29, 12:47 AM
Another important tenet of science that you might be interested in, Mr_Holes, is called "Occam's Razor". This says that we don't include aspects into our theories unless we need them, i.e., we don't add complications unless they explain things that we cannot explain without the complication. So the challenge is not for science to say why the Big Bang could not have been a firecracker roll, it is to you to say what imagining it is a firecracker roll adds to our understanding that we cannot have without that complication. Is there an observation it would help understand? Because in the absence of that, the answer is that anything could be true, the only question that matters is, is a firecracker roll a simpler or more complicated model than a single uniform expansion?

SkyZesus
2009-Sep-03, 03:55 PM
I wanted to point out that the Big Bang was not really an explosion. It was an expansion of space itself; an instantaneous expansion that turned a tiny dot into the Universe we see today.

Fiery Phoenix is right. Calling the Big Bang an "explosion" is just a metaphor. Its the best way to explain it.

cosmocrazy
2009-Sep-03, 09:50 PM
Welcome to BAUT.

Another very simple analogy it is to think of a balloon and on the surface are the stars and galaxies. At some point way back all these things occupied a very small area in fact it is believed that this area had no size at all, but thats another topic! for now lets just keep it simple. As you blow up the balloon the galaxies fly apart and there is no defining centre, anywhere you point on the surface of the balloon could be considered the centre. The universe is believed to be much the same. Just that the expansion was very fast, its even believed to have been faster than light during and shortly after the initial start of the BB.