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lostgalaxy
2009-Jul-01, 12:07 PM
Hi,

What is the hardest thing to crack? Is it true that the more simple the composition, the more compact the object is.

So Cl2 is more durable than KCl? And diamond is tough because it's made of carbon molecule only.

Applying this to heavenly bodies, is star binary system the most durable? How rare is the case when two stars are of the same size?

I'm sorry I'm asking too much but I need these info for my study into human relationship. I guess it's just the same thing. Thanks.

LG

NEOWatcher
2009-Jul-01, 12:29 PM
...Is it true that the more simple the composition, the more compact the object is.

So Cl2 is more durable than KCl? And diamond is tough because it's made of carbon molecule only....
No; There are many factors, but the method of molecular bonding is probably most important.
Graphite is made of carbon only too, and it's much less dense.



Applying this to heavenly bodies, is star binary system the most durable?
What do you mean by durable? Longevity? stability? Density?

Stroller
2009-Jul-01, 02:04 PM
The co-valent bond vs the co-habiting blonde

Discuss :)

lostgalaxy
2009-Jul-01, 02:43 PM
What do you mean by durable? Longevity? stability? Density?

Thanks NEOWatcher. I mean it's hard to break. So it's a combo longevity and stability.

lostgalaxy
2009-Jul-01, 02:46 PM
The co-valent bond vs the co-habiting blonde

Discuss :)

Thanks Stroller for reminding me of this shared electron thing. And a lovely pun that is! :)

PraedSt
2009-Jul-01, 04:00 PM
The co-valent bond vs the co-habiting blonde:lol:

Stroller
2009-Jul-01, 05:20 PM
Thanks Stroller for reminding me of this shared electron thing.

Yes, but nowhere near as tough as maintaining a permanent close relationship with Marilyn Monroe.

The Ionic Bond with the Iconic Blonde

;)

Ara Pacis
2009-Jul-01, 06:10 PM
Hi,

What is the hardest thing to crack? Is it true that the more simple the composition, the more compact the object is.

So Cl2 is more durable than KCl? And diamond is tough because it's made of carbon molecule only.

Applying this to heavenly bodies, is star binary system the most durable? How rare is the case when two stars are of the same size?

I'm sorry I'm asking too much but I need these info for my study into human relationship. I guess it's just the same thing. Thanks.

LG

Are you referring to hardness, tensile strength, compressive strength, bending, impact brittleness?

Are you trying to find scientific analogues to support or oppose homogeniety or heterogeneity and bonding?

novaderrik
2009-Jul-01, 07:20 PM
the 307 that was in my cousin's 1971 Chevy Chevelle was made out of some pretty indestructible stuff- even with no oil or coolant and a couple of pounds of sand dumped into it, it still refused to break.
i think it was made out of "Sterner Stuff".

Jens
2009-Jul-02, 02:43 AM
Applying this to heavenly bodies, is star binary system the most durable? How rare is the case when two stars are of the same size?

I'm sorry I'm asking too much but I need these info for my study into human relationship. I guess it's just the same thing. Thanks.


Honestly, I don't think the analogies are valid. What makes a material strong is not really related at all to human relationships. Making people stand in a hexagon pattern rather than a square one is not going to do anything for their human relations.

NEOWatcher
2009-Jul-02, 05:27 PM
Making people stand in a hexagon pattern rather than a square one is not going to do anything for their human relations.
Hey, man... dem squares aint cool, they weak...

Swift
2009-Jul-03, 03:23 AM
Are you referring to hardness, tensile strength, compressive strength, bending, impact brittleness?

Are you trying to find scientific analogues to support or oppose homogeniety or heterogeneity and bonding?
And are you referring to a bulk, solid material (in which case the properties Ara Pacis mentioned are the critical thing) or are you talking about breaking a single chemical bond. A single sodium chloride molecule may be hard to "break" (split into two atoms because of the strength of the chemical bond), but a large single crystal of sodium chloride is relatively weak mechanically.

clop
2009-Jul-03, 11:38 AM
Hi,

What is the hardest thing to crack? Is it true that the more simple the composition, the more compact the object is.

So Cl2 is more durable than KCl? And diamond is tough because it's made of carbon molecule only.

Applying this to heavenly bodies, is star binary system the most durable? How rare is the case when two stars are of the same size?

I'm sorry I'm asking too much but I need these info for my study into human relationship. I guess it's just the same thing. Thanks.

LG

When I studied metallurgy twenty years ago I learned about the crystalline structure of metals and their relative strengths.

From what I remember, the strongest metal of all would be one where the atoms were arranged in a perfect lattice, with no "fault lines", and no contamination by other substances (which create "fault lines").

If you could purify a metal 100%, and have a perfectly regular matrix of atoms, you would have the strongest form of that metal.

Unfortunately it is virtually impossible to purify a metal to the point where there are no contaminants present, i.e. no fault lines.

One single fault line will render a piece of metal extremely brittle.

But in general practice, where it is impossible to eradicate all fault lines, it turns out that the strongest metals are those that contain many fault lines. A material is much stronger when it has a huge number of fault lines interlocking in three dimensions than when it has, say, one single fault line.

It seems illogical, but that's what I was taught.

clop

Dgennero
2009-Jul-03, 01:55 PM
I think, "the hardest thing to crack" and at the same time the most stable thing as for longevity is a Neutron Star. I don't count black holes as matter as we know it. Try to scratch something from a N.S.'s surface or split it in two. Any approach with anything will result in that thing to become part of the N.S.
And it will be a long, long time until all those Neutrons will have decayed.

lostgalaxy
2009-Jul-04, 03:22 AM
Thanks Swift and all,

I've got really interesting stuffs here. Especially clop's "purism" and Dgennero's "neutralism".

It's known that in the end everything collapses. Every bondage breaks. Still one wants to know what's the next best to deathlessness.

mugaliens
2009-Jul-06, 09:28 AM
I'd have to say it's degenerate matter, which, with preon degeneracy, is seriously more dense (and tough) than neutron degeneracy.