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DaxFla
2002-Apr-03, 02:11 AM
In the mid-March "Enterprise", not only can they breathe on a comet, but the comet - which is shown as asteroid size - is shown with normal Earth gravity to walk on, and to crush the shuttle craft down a cave!! Is this crazy, or what?? On a comet that size not only would there be no air, but you could practically jump yourself into space.

WHarris
2002-Apr-03, 10:50 AM
Did you have your eyes closed for the entire episode? They were wearing spacesuits.

The Bad Astronomer
2002-Apr-03, 03:46 PM
Please, take it easy! No need for sarcasm here. Don't forget [Rule #2 of the FAQ (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/faq.php#rules).

Yes, they wore spacesuits. And yes, the gravity was way too high! Andre Bormanis, one of the writers, was asked about this in a webchat. He said making it look like low gravity would have been prohibitively difficult given the show's budget and timeline. It's too bad about that. That was one of the reasons I liked Deep Impact.

DaxFla
2002-Apr-03, 07:01 PM
Didn't they take their helmet or a glove off or something? Maybe I am wrong about the air, sorry, I'll have to watch the rerun. The writer could have made it a large asteroid instead, then the shuttle craft crash and struggle to climb up wouldn't have been so ridiculous.

ToSeek
2002-Apr-03, 07:15 PM
Maybe it was a comet the size of Venus. (http://skepdic.com/velikov.html) /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

thkaufm
2002-Apr-04, 01:47 AM
I think I remember them saying it was eighty something kilometers in size.

Tom

Martian Jim
2002-Apr-04, 04:56 AM
if they land on anything small next time they could just say they have "gravity packs" on the bottom of their shoes to keep em stuck down. that would make it a bit more realistic.

WHarris
2002-Apr-04, 11:15 AM
On 2002-04-03 10:46, The Bad Astronomer wrote:
Please, take it easy! No need for sarcasm here. Don't forget [Rule #2 of the FAQ (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/faq.php#rules).


And the moral of the story is: I shouldn't post before my morning cup of coffee.

Sorry.

Bob S.
2002-Apr-04, 10:05 PM
On 2002-04-03 14:01, DaxFla wrote:
Didn't they take their helmet or a glove off or something? Maybe I am wrong about the air, sorry, I'll have to watch the rerun. The writer could have made it a large asteroid instead, then the shuttle craft crash and struggle to climb up wouldn't have been so ridiculous.

No, there were inside the shuttle pod the whole time.
You may be thinking of an episode of <u>Voyager</u> where they went inside a hollow asteroid in orbit about a planet, and it just so happened the rock had both normal gravity and air inside. (Not one of their best episodes for astronomy and science I must say.)

DaxFla
2002-Apr-08, 07:03 AM
Sorry, Bob, they were definitely not inside the shuttle craft the whole time - they were outside doing experiments. (If they were in the shuttlecraft, why would they be wearing space suits?) They were only inside the shuttle craft when it crashed through the floor down the cave.

And Jim - Yes, I expected them to say they had gravity packs on their feet, but even that would not have helped prevent the shuttlecraft crash through the floor. Why couldn't they just fly it out?

Thanks thkauf - I think it was 80 km. At that size the centrifugal force of the spin alone (remember it spun the sun into view) might have sent them off into space.

Another BAD SCIENCE part: The amount of "melting" that a comet does to create its tail is miniscule - if it was anything close to the total meltdown they showed, the comet would never have lasted long enought to be a comet. I suppose this could have been a random space-ice chunk which got propelled towards a star for its first (and last) time.

Bob S.
2002-Apr-09, 05:10 PM
On 2002-04-08 03:03, DaxFla wrote:
Sorry, Bob, they were definitely not inside the shuttle craft the whole time - they were outside doing experiments. (If they were in the shuttlecraft, why would they be wearing space suits?) They were only inside the shuttle craft when it crashed through the floor down the cave.

Wait, my bad. Yes, they had the EVA suits for the experiements outside. But inside the crevasse they remained inside the pod. Yeah, a lot of BA for gravity issues.

ToSeek
2002-Apr-09, 05:35 PM
Maybe there was a tiny black hole inside the comet? (grasping for an explanation....)

Chip
2002-Apr-09, 05:53 PM
On 2002-04-04 17:05, Bob S. wrote:

You may be thinking of an episode of <u>Voyager</u> where they went inside a hollow asteroid in orbit about a planet, and it just so happened the rock had both normal gravity and air inside. (Not one of their best episodes for astronomy and science I must say.)


I remember an episode from the "original" (i.e. Kirk & Spock) Star Trek where they come across a hollow asteroid that is actually a ship, with Babylonian-costumed people living there, a sexy princess who falls for McCoy for a change - (way to go Doc!) - and a nasty room with a "Book of the People" that turns into an oven if you mess with the book without permission. (That hollow world was a bit bigger than the Enterprise, but still had earthlike gravity.) I didn't notice that at the time. I was still looking at the princess. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

Donnie B.
2002-Apr-09, 07:11 PM
Well, since the Star Trek universe has artificial gravity, we could simply assume that the world of "For The World Is Hollow, And I Have Touched The Sky" has it too.

But it's a bit strange, anyway... if you have AG, why not live on the surface? Why go to the trouble and expense of building a shell over the top, or hollowing out the interior? And just how much was hollow, anyway? Was it just a level or two under the outer skin, or was it "turtles all the way down"?

Ah well, I don't suppose it pays to spend much time fretting about such matters...

Chip
2002-Apr-09, 07:42 PM
On 2002-04-09 15:11, Donnie B. wrote:
"...Ah well, I don't suppose it pays to spend much time fretting about such matters..."


Yeah, I guess so...except...maybe they had to live inside the rock to hide from someone. Their "ship-world" had weapons if I remember...ah - the plot thickens. Maybe they're being pursued and they had to disguise themselves (not everyone has a cloaking device.) (Weren't they called the "Phrebeanie"?)..ah - the plot thickens. (Though I'm glad they didn't make a spin-off series - "every week the Phrebeanie have a new adventure in their rock'n ship! This week's guest star, Bob Denver!" --- However, that story would have made a cool follow-up episode for Star Trek TNG.

Donnie B.
2002-Apr-09, 09:32 PM
Hmm, true... especially if Bones had actually married his princess instead of finding the cure for his incurable disease in their archives.

Kaptain K
2002-Apr-11, 08:36 AM
In the book, "Star Trek: The Lost Years", McCoy did go back, only to find that his "princess" hadn't waited for him. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_frown.gif

Chuck
2002-Apr-11, 01:35 PM
The worst part of that episode was when Kirk and Spock finally get to the asteroid's computer room and start reprogramming the thing after two seconds of study. How do they figure out alien technology so quickly? Since the computer was locked away it's obvious that tampering was undesirable. Don't aliens believe in using encryption and passwords?

Chip
2002-Apr-11, 02:40 PM
On 2002-04-11 09:35, Chuck wrote:
"The worst part of that episode was when Kirk and Spock finally get to the asteroid's computer room and start reprogramming the thing after two seconds of study. How do they figure out alien technology so quickly?"


I remember the "Yonada" computer being black boxes with bright lights, very similar to other alien computers on the show. Kirk & Spock were familiar with that tech - like switching from PC to MAC. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif The "Yonadans" probably bought spare parts left over from the same aliens who made the monolith computer for those North American Indians whom they transported to that paradise forest planet (in yet another episode). (Oh my - what if the asteroid threatening the Indian planet was actually Yonada?! That's a twist!) /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif

Here's a mini synopsis of "For the World is Hollow..." http://www.sttpd.com/guides/tos/3/66

Donnie B.
2002-Apr-11, 06:41 PM
Yeah, and the same outfit sold the computers to the two planets that had automated their endless war... you know... the episode with my favorite line: "This one's the key; take it out and they'll all go!"

Ah yes... another shining example of the Prime Directive in action. But we love 'em anyway... /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

Chuck
2002-Apr-11, 11:31 PM
Maybe all aliens have similar computers due to some kind of convergent technology that naturally leads to similar systems. After some initial experimenting, all civilizations reinvent Windows 95.