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lostgalaxy
2009-Jul-06, 02:51 AM
And give off matter in return? Which is how new objects are born in the universe?

I'm not sure if this question fits here. It may sound absurd but I'm serious.

Cougar
2009-Jul-06, 01:47 PM
Is it possible that some black holes absorb anti-matter?

What antimatter?

Gandalf223
2009-Jul-06, 02:41 PM
If an "antiblack hole" absorbed antimatter and gave off matter, that would postulate that black holes, when absorbing matter, must give off antimatter. Since that hasn't been seen or, AFAIK, even theorized, then probably not (my guess to your question.)

eburacum45
2009-Jul-06, 04:44 PM
Black holes would absorb antimatter just as easily as matter, if current theories are correct. To a black hole, matter and antimatter are just mass. Adding antimatter to a black hole wouldn't change the type of radiation it gave off.

lostgalaxy
2009-Jul-07, 01:32 PM
Ok. I'm answered.

AriAstronomer
2009-Jul-09, 06:25 PM
Black holes do absorb anti-matter, it is part of the Hawking Radiation concept. Particles of matter and antimatter will spring up in areas near an event horizon, and sometimes the antimatter will be engulfed by the hole, and sometimes the matter will. On the times the antimatter does, the black hole decreases in size slightly, and the matter escapes and appears to us as radiation coming out of a black hole (even though the hole isn't REALLY giving off radiation from inside). As more anti matter is absorbed, the black hole shrinks and heats up a bit, at an exponential rate actually over billions of years. As it heats up, they begin to give off light it is theorized, and it is what scientists are looking for now...

grant hutchison
2009-Jul-09, 07:59 PM
Black holes do absorb anti-matter, it is part of the Hawking Radiation concept. Particles of matter and antimatter will spring up in areas near an event horizon, and sometimes the antimatter will be engulfed by the hole, and sometimes the matter will. On the times the antimatter does, the black hole decreases in size slightly, and the matter escapes and appears to us as radiation coming out of a black hole (even though the hole isn't REALLY giving off radiation from inside).Actually, the hole shrinks no matter whether a particle or antiparticle is absorbed during the production of Hawking radiation. The absorbed particle has negative total energy, so far as distant observers are concerned, no matter whether it is the particle or the antiparticle of the original virtual pair.

Likewise, as eburacum45 has already said, if you drop a chunk of matter or antimatter into a black hole from a distance it will gain mass, irrespective of the kind of particle it absorbs.

Grant Hutchison

Glom
2009-Jul-14, 06:26 PM
If a black hole had consumed equal amounts of matter and antimatter, then what's in the black hole is really just photons?

Black holes are freaky.

grant hutchison
2009-Jul-14, 07:31 PM
If a black hole had consumed equal amounts of matter and antimatter, then what's in the black hole is really just photons?Well, no. What's in the black hole is whatever the "singularity" is made of: something requiring new physics.

Grant Hutchison

Glom
2009-Jul-14, 07:35 PM
Well, no. What's in the black hole is whatever the "singularity" is made of: something requiring new physics.

We still need to give whatever it is a name. Singularitonium?