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View Full Version : CW Leonis AKA Planet X. Please help me debunk.



brink
2009-Jul-31, 04:06 PM
Here we see stars that appear to be moving. Holding the mouse slowly across the screen we can see that there is actually 3 objects there.

1. "CW Leonis" or HD 84937
2. "R Leonis" or D 84748
3. "TYC 834-746-1"

OK so what the hell is going on?

http://www.wikisky.org/?ra=9.718787069618182&de=13.284742892804706&zoom=4&show_grid=0&show_constellation_lines=0&show_constellation_boundaries=0&show_const_names=0&show_galaxies=1&img_source=IRAS

Let's actually look at the pictures of this object..

This is "TYC 834-746-1"
http://server1.wikisky.org/starview?object_type=1&object_id=190667

Since when do stars make tails like comets? Stars aren't supposed to move THAT fast.. this thing is going warp speed!

Here is "CW Leonis" or "HD 84937"
http://server1.wikisky.org/starview?object_type=1&object_id=190657

It also appears to have a tail!

R Leonis does not have a tail and appears stationary.

What the hell is going on? What is the object "TYC 834-746-1"? :silenced:

GuyHill
2009-Jul-31, 04:32 PM
As for HD 84937, it is the star inside the little square on each picture on http://server1.wikisky.org/starview?...ject_id=190657. Apparently these pictures were taken when a comet happened to be visible in its vicinity.

The same is true of TYC 834-746-1. It's another star, which is in the vicinity of HD 84937, photographed when a comet happened to be in the field of view.

NEOWatcher
2009-Jul-31, 05:47 PM
Is that what this is all about?
I opened the link, and the only things I saw with tails were pictures labeled with a reference to Comet Lulin.

brink
2009-Jul-31, 07:14 PM
So you're trying to say that in this photo

http://www.wikisky.org/?ra=9.718787069618182&de=13.284742892804706&zoom=4&show_grid=0&show_constellation_lines=0&show_constellation_boundaries=0&show_const_names=0&show_galaxies=1&img_source=IRAS

Both of these objects are comets?

brink
2009-Jul-31, 07:17 PM
Also Venus's spot and Jupiter impact site are both on the South pole, meaning that most likely Planet X, or Hellion-1957, or The Brown Dwarf killer star is getting close, but coming at us from south of the elliptic, would you agree? :whistle:

This would explain why no one is looking for it, silly scientists only look on our elliptic for things.. what a waste.

R.A.F.
2009-Jul-31, 07:17 PM
Both of these objects are comets?

Why don't you investigate and tell us what you find?

R.A.F.
2009-Jul-31, 07:18 PM
Also Venus's spot and Jupiter impact site are both on the South pole, meaning that most likely Planet X, or Hellion-1957, or The Brown Dwarf killer star is getting close, but coming at us from south of the elliptic, would you agree? :whistle:

No...why would you think so??

Gillianren
2009-Jul-31, 07:24 PM
Also Venus's spot and Jupiter impact site are both on the South pole, meaning that most likely Planet X, or Hellion-1957, or The Brown Dwarf killer star is getting close, but coming at us from south of the elliptic, would you agree? :whistle:

No.


This would explain why no one is looking for it, silly scientists only look on our elliptic for things.. what a waste.

Hence Pluto? (You mean ecliptic, by the way.)

R.A.F.
2009-Jul-31, 07:33 PM
...silly scientists only look on our elliptic for things.. what a waste.

Do you really believe that scientists are that short sighted?

NGCHunter
2009-Jul-31, 08:20 PM
So you're trying to say that in this photo

http://www.wikisky.org/?ra=9.718787069618182&de=13.284742892804706&zoom=4&show_grid=0&show_constellation_lines=0&show_constellation_boundaries=0&show_const_names=0&show_galaxies=1&img_source=IRAS

Both of these objects are comets?

No, they look like bright point light sources bearing a single verticle diffraction spike to me.

brink
2009-Jul-31, 08:33 PM
No, they look like bright point light sources bearing a single verticle diffraction spike to me.

further explain please

NGCHunter
2009-Jul-31, 08:45 PM
further explain please

Not all telescopes use the traditional "cross vane" spider, which produces the familiar "plus sign" of diffraction spikes on bright stars:
http://www.danlessmann.com/images/Astro/M45_2005-12-30_1_filtered.jpg

Some telescopes use single vane spiders to hold the secondary mirror:
http://mysite.verizon.net/res6jv9o/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/.pond/singlevane.jpg.w300h225.jpg

The result is a single spike on sufficiently bright point light sources (such as bright stars and planets at low magnification) that looks like this:
http://pictures.ed-morana.com/IridiumFlares/IridFlare060206.jpg

Diffraction spikes are common, but their number and angle depend on the type of device used to hold the secondary mirror or camera in place in front of the primary mirror. Some telescopes with secondary mirrors don't use any spider vane at all, but instead hold it in the middle using a piece of glass called a Schmidt corrector plate.

brink
2009-Jul-31, 10:08 PM
could be, but there are no horizontal lines like in your pictures. What would you think this object is?

Comet Lulin I think was a bad guess, disinfo if you will.

Unless the 2nd object by R Leonis is Comet Lulin #2

Joe

ngc3314
2009-Jul-31, 10:29 PM
In this case the problem is not optical but electronic. IRAS scanned the sky with a large array of individual detectors. Ordinary stars are bright only at the shortest of its four wavelengths bands (12 microns), which is displayed as blue on most color representations of the IRAS data such as wikisky. Scanning very bright sources produced a transient change in the detector response, which maps to a tail in one or both directions if not corrected. (This behavior continued on the later ISO mission, and is one of the reasons some ISO users prefer not to think about what they had to go through to get clean data). The effect is visible in every star bright enough near the listed locations; in some parts of the sky the tails are more or less noticeable in maps made from the scan data, depending on how many times the satellite scanned that area and in what directions, so that the effect might be either partially cancelled or added. The effect is documented here (http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/IRASdocs/iras_data_features.html), along with some of the other peculiarities to which IRAS data are subject. These point-source tails are described and illustrated under "Hysteresis effects" near the bottom.

NGCHunter
2009-Aug-01, 02:35 AM
could be, but there are no horizontal lines like in your pictures. What would you think this object is?

Comet Lulin I think was a bad guess, disinfo if you will.

Unless the 2nd object by R Leonis is Comet Lulin #2

Joe
I won't deny that NGC3314's detailed knowledge of IRAS's systems already explained it better than I did, but secondary diffraction spikes only occur in spider vanes containing more than one bar, as I mentioned before. There's nothing inherently unusual about single diffraction spikes, regardless of their orientation, which at best is only an indication of the tube's rotation with respect to the detector, or if you're using generalized 3rd party mapping software like this, orientation is likely due to how the image had to be oriented to fit on the map.

Comet Lulin is precisely what is contained in some of your wikisky info in the original post.

GuyHill
2009-Aug-01, 09:33 AM
So you're trying to say that in this photo

http://www.wikisky.org/?ra=9.718787069618182&de=13.284742892804706&zoom=4&show_grid=0&show_constellation_lines=0&show_constellation_boundaries=0&show_const_names=0&show_galaxies=1&img_source=IRAS

Both of these objects are comets?

Not at all. They are the same stars as the ones in the other links you provided. This picture was taken when there was no comet in the field of view. I don't mean to insult you, but you are aware that comets move, don't you?

brink
2009-Aug-02, 03:45 PM
Then please explain what is in this photo?

http://server1.wikisky.org/starview?object_type=1&object_id=190667

http://server1.wikisky.org/starview?object_type=1&object_id=190609


And why is it blocked out on EVERY other sky imaging program?

Google Sky - Blocked
Microsoft - Blocked

NGCHunter
2009-Aug-02, 06:20 PM
I see comet Lulin and a bunch of stars. Why would comet Lulin show up in general star mapping applications like google sky and WWT? I wouldn't call it "blacked out" - the comet just wasn't there when the google sky and WWT pictures were taken, nor were they put together by google and microsoft for the purpose of showing comets at arbitrary time points.

brink
2009-Aug-03, 03:24 AM
the better term would be "censored" ... just look in google sky.. ill try and find a link

NGCHunter
2009-Aug-03, 12:29 PM
the better term would be "censored"
It's a comet, comets are transient and do not stay in any one place. Please tell us why you think comet Lulin is being censored from google sky when google sky isn't designed to help you locate comets? Lulin's already receeded to such a great distance from the sun that it no longer has a tail or looks anything like it did in those close approach photos, so why should google sky or any other sky chart show it in its current place looking anything like that? At best it should be a tiny comet symbol somewhere in an advanced sky charting program like TheSky or Cartes du Ciel.

ineluki
2009-Aug-03, 01:28 PM
OK so what the hell is going on?
What the hell is going on? What is the object "TYC 834-746-1"? :silenced:

This would explain why no one is looking for it, silly scientists only look on our elliptic for things.. what a waste.

Comet Lulin I think was a bad guess, disinfo if you will.

Then please explain what is in this photo?

the better term would be "censored" ...


It is obvious that you aren't looking for "debunking help", and quite frankly I think it's rather dishonest to pretend you are.

Please clearly state your conspiracy theory, what is it's purpose, who is behind it, and what steps you have taken to rule out any harmless reasons.