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tuffel999
2004-Jan-22, 01:10 AM
What would life on mars be like?

What problems do you guess/see?

freddo
2004-Jan-22, 01:25 AM
life on Mars would be = Microbial

a problem is = it's underground

tuffel999
2004-Jan-22, 01:28 AM
So I meant for people who may go there.

Like difference in daylight messing with people's normal body functions...etc.

freddo
2004-Jan-22, 01:32 AM
Like difference in daylight messing with people's normal body functions...etc.

I imagine it wouldn't be much worse than a mild case of 'jetlag.' As fate would have it, the Martian day is remarkably similar in length to our own - a small adjustment.

I would imagine the biggest impact would be permanent residence in a place where there is less gravity - this is a long term thing for sure - perhaps even generational?

Sparks
2004-Jan-22, 01:39 AM
Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars trilogy would be a good place to start reading for this I think...

Kaptain K
2004-Jan-22, 11:47 AM
So I meant for people who may go there.

Like difference in daylight messing with people's normal body functions...etc.
Experiments with people in isolation have shown that the body's clocks run at around 28 hours/day unless reset by external stimuli. So, the longer Martian day (~24h 38m) should not have any deliterious effects.

Amadeus
2004-Jan-22, 12:08 PM
Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars trilogy would be a good place to start reading for this I think...

Good choice. Not only tackles the tachnical aspects but the social ones too.

2004-Jan-22, 12:50 PM
So I meant for people who may go there.

Like difference in daylight messing with people's normal body functions...etc.
Experiments with people in isolation have shown that the body's clocks run at around 28 hours/day unless reset by external stimuli. So, the longer Martian day (~24h 38m) should not have any deliterious effects.

You would adjust to a change of that magnitude at the equator, towards the poles you would have the same seasonal problems as Earth. It is bad enough here, Colt would know more about the extremes than I do.

Bawheid
2004-Jan-22, 12:52 PM
So I meant for people who may go there.

Like difference in daylight messing with people's normal body functions...etc.
Experiments with people in isolation have shown that the body's clocks run at around 28 hours/day unless reset by external stimuli. So, the longer Martian day (~24h 38m) should not have any deliterious effects.

You would adjust to a change of that magnitude at the equator, towards the poles you would have the same seasonal problems as Earth. It is bad enough here, Colt would know more about the extremes than I do.

Ummm, don't know what I did here, but I posted this as "Guest". :oops:

Squink
2004-Jan-22, 05:04 PM
What would life on mars be like?

What problems do you guess/see?

It'll prabably share most of its biochemistry with earth type extremophiles. Once we find it, there'll be a huge debate as to whether that similarity represents simply cross contamination between planets in the same system, or evidence of galaxy-wide panspermia.

tuffel999
2004-Jan-22, 09:04 PM
What would life on mars be like?

What problems do you guess/see?

It'll prabably share most of its biochemistry with earth type extremophiles. Once we find it, there'll be a huge debate as to whether that similarity represents simply cross contamination between planets in the same system, or evidence of galaxy-wide panspermia.

Again I meant for people who would go there.....not for anything that might be there.

Dancar
2004-Jan-22, 09:24 PM
The biggest problem is that the atmosphere is poisonious and there's not enough of it.

It would be similar to the problems addressed in orbital missions except that you would have enough gravity to keep things in place. But maintaining a heathy air supply in a sealed environment is a BIG challenge, followed by keeping the tempurature in range comfortable for humans. And since any mission to Mars & back would take several years, you have to worry about food and recycling your water.

Dancar
2004-Jan-22, 09:27 PM
Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars trilogy would be a good place to start reading for this I think...

Great series! Whenever a Mars probe lands, I always try to figure out if it is a location described in one of the books.

Dancar

Sparks
2004-Jan-22, 09:29 PM
Great series! Whenever a Mars probe lands, I always try to figure out if it is a location described in one of the books.
Technically it could only be a location from the first book, Red Mars (I'll not say why to avoid spoiling the read for those that haven't read it...).

Dancar
2004-Jan-22, 09:39 PM
Great series! Whenever a Mars probe lands, I always try to figure out if it is a location described in one of the books.
Technically it could only be a location from the first book, Red Mars (I'll not say why to avoid spoiling the read for those that haven't read it...).

I'll settle for a location from any of the books, since I don't expect to see any signs of the First Hundred or those the followed (is that vague enough?).

Dancar