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Humphrey
2004-Jan-22, 05:04 AM
If a nuclear war ever broke out on mars. Or some were released to help melt some ice caps. Would you have a nuclear winter or is there too little atmosphere to keep a cloud layer of the debris?

Sparks
2004-Jan-22, 08:51 AM
If a nuclear war ever broke out on mars. Or some were released to help melt some ice caps. Would you have a nuclear winter or is there too little atmosphere to keep a cloud layer of the debris?
I thought that the nuclear winter theory had seen some heavy criticism and was in effect debunked?

ktesibios
2004-Jan-22, 10:13 AM
IIRC, the idea of nuclear winter was based on modeling the effects of vast quantities of smoke and soot released into the atmosphere by the fires attending a massive thermonuclear exchange, not on debris released or kicked up by the bombs themselves.

There doesn't seem to be much flammable stuff on Mars, nor an atmosphere that would support combustion.

Irrespective of the validity of the theory, it wouldn't be easy to set up the initial conditions on Mars.

Swift
2004-Jan-22, 02:33 PM
On the flip side, I recall (don't remember where) an idea of terraforming Mars by smaking a bunch of comet cores or similar snowballs into Mars to dump a bunch of water on to it.

Stuart
2004-Jan-22, 03:16 PM
If a nuclear war ever broke out on mars. Or some were released to help melt some ice caps. Would you have a nuclear winter or is there too little atmosphere to keep a cloud layer of the debris?

My first reaction would be, are we sure Mars didn't get this way FROM a nuclear war?

The effects of a nuclear strike on Mars would depend almost entirely on the targeteering used. What was hit, how it was hit and sequence in which things were hit would mostly dominate.

Nuclear Winter isn't a problem. It isn't one on Earth and won't be one on Mars. I'd want to know a lot more about Martian conditions and ground structure before going further than that.

Amadeus
2004-Jan-22, 03:24 PM
On the flip side, I recall (don't remember where) an idea of terraforming Mars by smaking a bunch of comet cores or similar snowballs into Mars to dump a bunch of water on to it.

I think thats in the mars trilogy (blue mars I think)

Humphrey
2004-Jan-22, 10:30 PM
Thanks guys. :-)

Stuart:
Does a nuclear or hydrogen bomb work differently in space and on the relatively weak atmosphere of mars than on the surface of the earth? Meaning, does the atmosphere actually change the aspects of the bomb?

Oh by the way, welcome back stuart. :-)

Dancar
2004-Jan-22, 11:29 PM
If a nuclear war ever broke out on mars. Or some were released to help melt some ice caps. Would you have a nuclear winter or is there too little atmosphere to keep a cloud layer of the debris?

My first reaction would be, are we sure Mars didn't get this way FROM a nuclear war?


That's the premise of at least a few science fiction books, but I think you should find some evidence of past technological civilization on Mars, or at least signs of past nuclear explosions, before considering that as a theory.

Dancar

Sparks
2004-Jan-23, 12:03 AM
Does a nuclear or hydrogen bomb work differently in space and on the relatively weak atmosphere of mars than on the surface of the earth? Meaning, does the atmosphere actually change the aspects of the bomb?
You mean, apart from the shock wave damage effect?

Humphrey
2004-Jan-23, 02:34 AM
Does a nuclear or hydrogen bomb work differently in space and on the relatively weak atmosphere of mars than on the surface of the earth? Meaning, does the atmosphere actually change the aspects of the bomb?
You mean, apart from the shock wave damage effect?

In any details. I understand that there will be no shock wave in space. Nuthing to propegate the wave itself. But how about on mars with a very thin atmosphere?

[edited out a redundancy that made no sense]

Madcat
2004-Jan-23, 05:13 AM
There should be a little shockwave, shouldn't there? The bomb doesn't convert anywhere near 100% of its mass to energy.

Sparks
2004-Jan-23, 07:46 AM
There should be a little shockwave, shouldn't there? The bomb doesn't convert anywhere near 100% of its mass to energy.
No, that's shrapnel, not a shock wave. (Well, it's gaseous shrapnel :D )
A shockwave requires a disturbance in a medium.

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2004-Jan-23, 11:34 AM
There should be a little shockwave, shouldn't there? The bomb doesn't convert anywhere near 100% of its mass to energy.
No, that's shrapnel, not a shock wave. (Well, it's gaseous shrapnel :D )
A shockwave requires a disturbance in a medium.

"There's a Great Disturbance in The Force!"

Sorry, that just had to be said.

At any rate, Stuart is definitely the guy to Inquire about this, maybe he'll Enlighten us, when he gets back.