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View Full Version : greetings to all ! [crater seen in google Earth?]



trilobytedaddy
2009-Aug-14, 11:51 PM
hi everyone, im new but i need help. might have found something on google earth that could be important. i think i found two craters. i may be crazy. but i feel im right. anyway please check it out and see if you can see what i see.
its just off the continental shelf
center is located @ 42*53'15.87" N x 44*02'20.57" w there is a smaller crater to the northwest of center inside the large one. 804 km .

pzkpfw
2009-Aug-15, 12:10 AM
Welcome to BAUT.

(I've edited your thread title as it may not have gotten the (kind of) attention it needed.)

01101001
2009-Aug-15, 12:41 AM
center is located @ 42*53'15.87" N x 44*02'20.57" w

It doesn't look like much with Google Maps, but there's not much ocean detail. At least this will orient people:

Google map :: 42 53 15.87 N 44 02 20.57 W (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=42+53+15.87+N++44+02+20.57+W&sll=42.88804,44.038696&sspn=1.372438,2.469177&ie=UTF8&ll=42.875964,-44.033203&spn=84.937427,158.027344&t=h&z=3)

matthewota
2009-Aug-15, 12:45 AM
I see nothing unusual at the coordinates you list.

DrWho
2009-Aug-15, 01:49 AM
I see nothing unusual either. However, I'm pretty sure I've found a real crater here! (http://maps.google.com.au/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=&daddr=21.453069,-89.719849&geocode=&hl=en&mra=dme&mrcr=0&mrsp=1&sz=8&sll=22.136532,-89.934082&sspn=4.430868,3.378296&ie=UTF8&ll=21.022983,-93.493652&spn=17.801612,24.389648&t=h&z=6):D

MattTheTubaGuy
2009-Aug-15, 03:34 AM
I think I see what you are talking about.
Certainly doesn't look like much, but it could be a crater.
is this (http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&ie=UTF8&oe=UTF8&msa=0&msid=118113472231523044492.00047125c5cc36f447e9a) what you meant?
(zoom out and change to satellite mode)

trilobytedaddy
2009-Aug-15, 03:57 AM
look farther out away from center . look at the underwater ranges and see a badly eroded rim. use the ruler tool to span the distance.you will see its a circle of about 500 miles across. the smaller one is a matter of depth shading.

Rhaedas
2009-Aug-15, 01:47 PM
Certainly there's a bit of curvature in parts of those marked areas, but that by itself isn't enough to confirm much. If there was evidence found such as shocked quartz or other compression formations (or the lack of them) then there would be more to debate. That's how the Chicxulub crater was confirmed, albeit it was a side result of oil exploration that ran across the evidence.

There's plenty of evidence across the solar system as well as some here on Earth that impacts can often occur in multiple bodies, or a chain. But you do have to establish first whether you have an actual impact site, or just a terrestrially formed structure that's suggestive of such. Then you'd need to date the proposed group, and see if they match up at all.

DrWho
2009-Aug-15, 02:23 PM
That's how the Chicxulub crater was confirmed, albeit it was a side result of oil exploration that ran across the evidence.
Heh, that's what I linked to, though you could never tell it was a creator impact going solely by Google maps...

Rhaedas
2009-Aug-15, 02:57 PM
Right, another good point. You have to look underneath the sediment on top, which you won't see on these maps. And, you might not find a crater to the eye, the familiar maps of Chicxulub (http://palaeo.gly.bris.ac.uk/communication/Hanks/Fig6.gif) aren't visual maps, but gravity density maps.

Perikles
2009-Aug-15, 06:32 PM
hi everyone, im new Welcome. Off-topic, I know, but I guess you can identify my avatar.

mahesh
2009-Aug-15, 09:03 PM
It doesn't look like much with Google Maps, but there's not much ocean detail. At least this will orient people:

Google map :: 42 53 15.87 N 44 02 20.57 W (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=42+53+15.87+N++44+02+20.57+W&sll=42.88804,44.038696&sspn=1.372438,2.469177&ie=UTF8&ll=42.875964,-44.033203&spn=84.937427,158.027344&t=h&z=3)
Thanks ZeroOne / trilobyte....

Nice slope of the continental shelf.
Using averted imagination, it's a lovely ride down it. :D

I find sea-bed maps, hypnotic. I could stare for hours, cogitating and lose myself on the walks around.

Count Zero
2009-Aug-17, 04:43 AM
It's highly unlikely that it is an impact feature. Remember that the Atlantic seafloor is spreading (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cb/Earth_seafloor_crust_age_poster.gif), and for a crater to be present, it has to be younger than the youngest part of the crust in the feature. In this case, the youngest crust is on the eastern side of the feature, and it is between 67 million and 83 million years old. An impact that large would have been a major mass-extinction event, and would be obvious in the geologic & fossil records.