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ignoranceoceanatom
2009-Aug-21, 06:06 PM
ion engines for space applications?

mugaliens
2009-Aug-23, 12:37 AM
Would that be "superheating" gases? (spelling correction, only) And what's "magnetronic" mean?

matthewota
2009-Aug-23, 03:22 AM
I heat my suppers with a microwave oven...

novaderrik
2009-Aug-23, 04:19 AM
is this thread about a corporate mission statement for a company that makes heaters for space ships?

matthewota
2009-Aug-23, 02:12 PM
No, it is in the same vein as the Retro Encabulator (http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5125780462773187994)..

JustAFriend
2009-Aug-24, 12:49 AM
has anyone seen articles on magnatronic supperheating gases pre ioniseation in
ion engines for space applications?

No but I've seen articles on people who like to make up words and phrases....

ignoranceoceanatom
2009-Aug-24, 05:12 AM
magnatronic supperheating gases; is a refference to the"nitrogen torch" which used a magnatron (early device generating microwaves) to convert N2 into N atoms which recombined into N2 thereby producing enough heat to melt Quartz rods.

mugaliens
2009-Aug-24, 11:35 PM
magnatronic supperheating gases; is a refference to the"nitrogen torch" which used a magnatron (early device generating microwaves) to convert N2 into N atoms which recombined into N2 thereby producing enough heat to melt Quartz rods.

Ahh... VASIMR (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variable_Specific_Impulse_Magnetoplasma_Rocket). Although it's purpose is as a thruster for spacecraft propulsion, with simple RF (not microwaves), and not as a cutting torch for melting quartz rods. In short, VASIMR uses radio waves to ionie and heat propellant and magnetic fields to accelerate the plasma, generating thrust.

Magnatrons are still used to generate microwaves - nearly every kitchen in the US has a cavity magnatron above or beside the stove.

Back to your cutting torch (http://www.thefabricator.com/CuttingWeldPrep/CuttingWeldPrep_Article.cfm?ID=1627)... Nitrogen has long been used as the plasma gas in plasma cutting torches, as it reaches temps of between 14,000 deg and 26,000 deg F, but it's not just because Nitrogen is used. Rather, it's because of the several hundred amps of current that's used by the torch.

Various gases are used, not for their heat, but for the way their plasma jets interact with the metals being cut.