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E-Mailer
2004-Jan-24, 10:09 AM
In science fictions, space warps are common...but...is there a possibility that using the universal components, we may actually drive like hyperspace speed? and actually end from one end to the other end of the universe? gathering for example energies emmited by black holes (counter-acting their gravitational fields just like magnets having contradicting forces if they have similar poles), energies from nearby stars, or the so-called atomic energy. If this will be possible, can it be applied in earth transportation having less power applied in it?

Taibak
2004-Jan-24, 08:02 PM
Actually, this is possible, but it will have to work quite a bit differently than what you're suggesting. You're right that gravity is the key to making this work. However, it's not as simple as finding some anti-gravitational force to counteract its pull. Basically, anti-gravity doesn't exist. Incidentally, why this is the case is one of the great puzzles in physics right now, partly because of the dark energy problem and partly because this makes gravity *very* different from the other forces.

However, according to the General Theory of Relativity, gravity bends space and time. Given enough gravity, it is theoretically possible to make the two fold back to back, like a sheet of paper folded in half. As such, it is also theoretically possible to temporarily open a wormhole between the points where the two ends meet. The problem is that there is no known way to produce the energy needed to do this. Some black holes might have the energy needed (I'm not convinced, but I'm no expert and haven't seen all the math yet), but there's no evidence that they actually do this and currently no known way to get enough energy out of the hole to do this artificially. Normal stars aren't dense enough to cause space and time to bend that much and, to the best of my knowledge don't produce quite enough energy to make an artificial wormhole. As for nuclear power, there just isn't enough of it on the planet to do this. We would need to develop new technology to do this.

Incidentally, Kip Thorne's book "Black Holes and Time Warps: Einstein's Outrageous Legacy" has a pretty good section on this. It's all theory, since none of this is even close to being proven, and still a matter of some controversy.

rwald
2004-Jan-25, 01:03 AM
I could have sworn that in order to stabalize a wormhole (so it didn't collapse when a single particle tried to pass through), we would need some form of anti-gravity. Had I heard wrongly?

Chip
2004-Jan-25, 01:32 AM
I could have sworn that in order to stabalize a wormhole (so it didn't collapse when a single particle tried to pass through), we would need some form of anti-gravity. Had I heard wrongly?

You would need to prove that "negative energy," implied by altering E=Mc2 to become E2 = m2c4 actually has a real connection to nature. E2 = m2c4 permits negative energy even though the mass within it is positive. However, is there a physical meaning to negative mass and negative energy values?

Also, here's a Scientific American article about this topic: http://www.physics.hku.hk/~tboyce/sf/topics/wormhole/wormhole.html

E-Mailer
2004-Jan-25, 05:41 AM
Anti-gravity or "negative force" may exist in a pocket or so of the universe, right? the issue is, how can we find them? And if wormholes are to be activated just to connect to non-linear points and make distance shorter, well, won't it make a permanent existence on its location?

Taibak
2004-Jan-25, 04:06 PM
Anti-gravity or "negative force" may exist in a pocket or so of the universe, right? the issue is, how can we find them?

If they do, there's no good evidence for it. It's probably impossible for the laws of physics work differently in one pocket of the universe than for another. As such, there probably is no region of the universe where gravity works backwards. The closest thing we have is so-called 'dark energy,' which is some sort of force that's pushing against gravity and causing the expansion of the universe to speed up. However, this works extremely slowly and only seems to work over very large scales. There's no evidence for there being concetrated pockets of this stuff - whatever it is - anywhere.


And if wormholes are to be activated just to connect to non-linear points and make distance shorter, well, won't it make a permanent existence on its location?

Not necessarily. As rwald and Chip pointed out, Einstein's equations predict that wormholes will close themselves at the speed of light. Once they're closed, they're gone. As I understand this (and again I'm no expert), Chip is right that we'll need some anti-gravitational force or a negative energy to keep a wormhole open. As far as anyone can tell, neither of these exist.