PDA

View Full Version : 50 things that are being killed by the internet



Argos
2009-Sep-10, 05:30 PM
Below we have compiled - in no particular order - 50 things that are in the process of being killed off by the web, from products and business models to life experiences and habits.

Telegraph.co.uk (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/6133903/50-things-that-are-being-killed-by-the-internet.html)

Paradoxically:

16) Hoaxes and conspiracy theories
The internet is often dismissed as awash with cranks, but it has proved far more potent at debunking conspiracy theories than perpetuating them. The excellent Snopes.com continues to deliver the final, sober, word on urban legends.

Bold mine.

Fazor
2009-Sep-10, 05:35 PM
Some amusing, some too true to be amusing, and others, well, not so much.

nauthiz
2009-Sep-10, 05:47 PM
Hmm - a couple of those look like padding, especially the ones that conflate the Internet with electronics in general. None of the portable electronics devices I use instead of a watch to tell the time require an Internet connection. My cell phone's contacts list may use a SIM card, but not an IP address. And I'm pretty sure that GPS satellites are not broadcasting UDP packets.

Swift
2009-Sep-10, 06:10 PM
I thought it a pretty poor list. I think a lot of those things "dying" has nothing to do with the Internet. For example:

10) Watches
Scrabbling around in your pocket to dig out a phone may not be as elegant as glancing at a watch, but it saves splashing out on two gadgets.

I think it true that watches are losing popularity, but it is not because of the Internet, it is because of cell phones - as they say themselves. Even non-Internet enabled phones give you the time and have for a decade or so.


23) Reading telegrams at weddings
Quoting from a wad of email printouts doesn't have the same magic.

Maybe that's a British thing, but I'm 50, have been to lots of wedding, and have never in my life seen a telegram read at any event and I don't think that has anything to do with the Internet.

Glom
2009-Sep-10, 06:12 PM
43) Solitaire
The original computer timewaster has been superseded by the more alluring temptations of the web. Ditto Minesweeper.

Absolutely not true. I'm playing Spider right now.

Glom
2009-Sep-10, 06:13 PM
I thought it a pretty poor list, at least up to # 20, where I gave up. I think a lot of those things "dying" has nothing to do with the Internet. For example:

I think it true that watches are losing popularity, but it is not because of the Internet, it is because of cell phones - as they say themselves. Even non-Internet enabled phones give you the time and have for a decade or so.

Remember when all the talk was about phones in watches? Now we have watches in phones.

Fazor
2009-Sep-10, 06:14 PM
I think it true that watches are losing popularity, but it is not because of the Internet, it is because of cell phones - as they say themselves. Even non-Internet enabled phones give you the time and have for a decade or so.

And even still, I'd be curious to how much it has to do with cell phones. I mean, they obviously reduce the need for watches, but I think as a culture, wearing watches started drifting "out of fashion" prior to the spread of cell phones. I know I personally quit wearing or caring about watches well before I had a cell phone.

I'm not disputing that cell phones as a factor, but I hesitate to say it's the only one.

mike alexander
2009-Sep-10, 06:24 PM
3) Listening to an album all the way through.

Just getting back to the days of my youth here, when the 45 single was king.

Gillianren
2009-Sep-10, 06:27 PM
Maybe that's a British thing, but I'm 50, have been to lots of wedding, and have never in my life seen a telegram read at any event and I don't think that has anything to do with the Internet.

It is because of the internet that Western Union stopped sending them, I believe, but I'd never seen one read anywhere either, except in movies.

I also think the writer had a fundamental misunderstanding of online culture, actually. Many of the things commented on just seem to be that certain groups are more prominent now than they used to be, not that those groups are actually larger. Like punctuality--the lack thereof in my social circle has nothing to do with technology. They just don't have a working acquaintance with the concept of "on time."

HenrikOlsen
2009-Sep-10, 06:54 PM
9) The myth of cat intelligence
The proudest household pets are now the illiterate butts of caption-based jokes. Icanhasreputashunback?
Bzzzzt, lolcatspeak has been analyzed and was found to be a version of English with quite strict grammar and syntax, qualifying it as an separate language.

You wouldn't call someone illiterate for writing in German instead of English, would you?
Especially since you're actually demonstrating fluency in lolcat.

14) Dead time
When was the last time you spent an hour mulling the world out a window, or rereading a favourite book? The internet's draw on our attention is relentless and increasingly difficult to resist.
16 hours ago.

23) Reading telegrams at weddings
Quoting from a wad of email printouts doesn't have the same magic.

I've been to several funerals where a printout of all the farewells sent online was cremated along with the body.

27) Knowing telephone numbers off by heart
After typing the digits into your contacts book, you need never look at them again.
Another thing killed by the cell phone, not by the internet.

32) Chuck Norris's reputation
The absurdly heroic boasts on Chuck Norris Facts may be affectionate, but will anyone take him seriously again?
If he ever was taken seriously, that died when he became yet another televised salesman.

45) Prostitute calling cards/ kerb crawling
Sex can be marketed more cheaply, safely and efficiently on the web than the street corner.
Which has done nothing to get the prostitutes off the street corners.

Gillianren
2009-Sep-10, 07:53 PM
Yeah, I noticed the "dead time" one myself. Now, I never spent an hour staring out the window, because my brain gets twitchy, but at least once a week, I take a nice, long, hot bath and read a book. I don't read as many books as I used to in my pre-internet days, but I'm not entirely sure hours spent reading TV Tropes or the Onion AV Club should qualify as not being "dead time." Or watching movies. Or the nice, pleasant walk around the block I take when my physical state, mental state, and the weather coincide. (My block is large enough, due to vagaries of the local geography, that it's about a mile.) Of course, my situation is also quite different from the average.

For one thing, I don't own a cell phone!

mike alexander
2009-Sep-10, 11:18 PM
Good for you.

Trebuchet
2009-Sep-10, 11:31 PM
Maybe that's a British thing, but I'm 50, have been to lots of wedding, and have never in my life seen a telegram read at any event and I don't think that has anything to do with the Internet.

I haven't either, but I do remember them being received and read at my grandparents 50th anniversary. In 1956!

Gillianren
2009-Sep-11, 12:14 AM
Good for you.

Well, I so seldom leave the house, after all. What do I need a cell phone for?

Musashi
2009-Sep-11, 03:38 AM
To tell the time?

ToSeek
2009-Sep-11, 03:45 AM
Telegraph.co.uk (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/6133903/50-things-that-are-being-killed-by-the-internet.html)

Paradoxically:

16) Hoaxes and conspiracy theories
The internet is often dismissed as awash with cranks, but it has proved far more potent at debunking conspiracy theories than perpetuating them. The excellent Snopes.com continues to deliver the final, sober, word on urban legends.

Bold mine.

I'd like to send along a couple of dozen links to websites that would seriously test that claim.

mugaliens
2009-Sep-11, 05:50 AM
Telegraph.co.uk (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/6133903/50-things-that-are-being-killed-by-the-internet.html)

Paradoxically:

16) Hoaxes and conspiracy theories
The internet is often dismissed as awash with cranks, but it has proved far more potent at debunking conspiracy theories than perpetuating them. The excellent Snopes.com continues to deliver the final, sober, word on urban legends.

Yep. Snopes does indeed do that.

On Snopes.

On Godlike Productions, Snopes does nothing. Therefore, if people choose to read Godlike Productions and ignore Snopes, no debunking has occured in the minds of the GLP puppies at all.

Fortunately, when it comes to opinions on controversial topics, most people shop around, and eventually get the good word on the good, the bad, and the ugly. Unfortunately, far to many people still hear one word that sounds good to them, latch onto it, and ignore everything else.

Perikles
2009-Sep-11, 09:23 AM
Yeah, I noticed the "dead time" one myself. Now, I never spent an hour staring out the window, because my brain gets twitchy, "LEISURE"

What is this life if, full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare.

No time to stand beneath the boughs
And stare as long as sheep or cows.

No time to see, when woods we pass,
Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass.

No time to see, in broad daylight,
Streams full of stars, like skies at night.

No time to turn at Beauty's glance,
And watch her feet, how they can dance.

No time to wait till her mouth can
Enrich that smile her eyes began.

A poor life this if, full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare.

By Wm. Henry Davies.

Gillianren
2009-Sep-11, 10:09 AM
I have time. I have plenty of time. Nothing but time, most days. That wasn't my point. To "stand and stare" for an hour? No. No, my brain won't let me do that. A few minutes is fine, and while I crossed the 101 overpass on the bus today, I looked out at the mountain, but an hour would have me begging for something else to do.

geonuc
2009-Sep-11, 10:49 AM
I have time. I have plenty of time. Nothing but time, most days. That wasn't my point. To "stand and stare" for an hour? No. No, my brain won't let me do that. A few minutes is fine, and while I crossed the 101 overpass on the bus today, I looked out at the mountain, but an hour would have me begging for something else to do.
That's too bad, Gillian. I hope someday you will be able to while away hours doing nothing but stare out at the world and daydream.

Glom
2009-Sep-11, 11:21 AM
Another thing killed by the cell phone, not by the internet.

Actually, landline phones were storing numbers before mobile phones became prevalent.


Fortunately, when it comes to opinions on controversial topics, most people shop around, and eventually get the good word on the good, the bad, and the ugly. Unfortunately, far to many people still hear one word that sounds good to them, latch onto it, and ignore everything else.

It is arguable, but how effectively would the Fox Special have been debunked had it not been for the Web.

HenrikOlsen
2009-Sep-11, 11:35 AM
Actually, landline phones were storing numbers before mobile phones became prevalent.
Yes, but fairly few numbers on each phone and not portable.

SolusLupus
2009-Sep-11, 11:48 AM
36) Mr Alifi's dignity Mr Tombe's dignity
Twenty years ago, if you were a Sudanese man who was forced to marry a goat after having sex with it, you'd take solace that news of your shame would be unlikely to spread beyond the neighbouring villages. Unfortunately for Mr Alifi, his indiscretion came in the digital age and became one of the first viral news stories.

As pointed out in the comments, Mr Alifi was just the goat's owner. It was another man, Mr Tombe, who actually did the deed. Apologies and thanks to readers for drawing attention to the error. (#51 Unchallenged journalistic inaccuracy?)

(Non bolded was the original statement; bolded was the correction)

There's a contradiction here, in the correction. Anyone else see it?

HenrikOlsen
2009-Sep-11, 11:55 AM
That it's actually a challenged journalistic inaccuracy?

Argos
2009-Sep-11, 01:43 PM
@ ToSeek, Mugaliens

Sure I have doubts about the debunking powers of the Internet. Actually I was suprised by that assertion.

Fazor
2009-Sep-11, 01:54 PM
[b]Actually I was suprised by that assertion.
Me too. If anything, I think the internet provides a global soapbox for people to spout this nonsense. I mean, just check out youtube.

jokergirl
2009-Sep-11, 02:08 PM
Actually, landline phones were storing numbers before mobile phones became prevalent.

To say nothing about phone books.

;)

SolusLupus
2009-Sep-11, 03:22 PM
That it's actually a challenged journalistic inaccuracy?

http://patrickstack.com/images/2008/04/a-winner-is-you1.gif

SolusLupus
2009-Sep-11, 03:24 PM
Me too. If anything, I think the internet provides a global soapbox for people to spout this nonsense. I mean, just check out youtube.

Providing a forum for nonsense does not automatically mean converts for nonsense.

Still, I'm not entirely convinced by the assertion quoted in the OP.

Fazor
2009-Sep-11, 03:48 PM
Providing a forum for nonsense does not automatically mean converts for nonsense.

No, but I never claimed it did. But if you're not reducing the amount of woo, then you're not killing woo. The article claims otherwise.

Perikles
2009-Sep-11, 04:44 PM
I have time. I have plenty of time. Nothing but time, most days. That wasn't my point. To "stand and stare" for an hour? No. No, my brain won't let me do that. A few minutes is fine, and while I crossed the 101 overpass on the bus today, I looked out at the mountain, but an hour would have me begging for something else to do.Well yes, I agree a whole hour seems rather unhealthy. However, I imagine that past generations might not agree with us - is there any way of knowing this? Did life used to be run at such a slow pace that a whole hour staring at nothing would not be unnatural?

Dgennero
2009-Sep-11, 04:53 PM
One more thing the internet killed (at least for me) is the thought "I am the only one who xyz". xyz = for example "invented a personal language".
This lead to the realization that you cannot be eccentric enough to be unique ;)

Gigabyte
2009-Sep-11, 05:09 PM
That is so not true.

Trust me.

Gillianren
2009-Sep-11, 05:14 PM
Well yes, I agree a whole hour seems rather unhealthy. However, I imagine that past generations might not agree with us - is there any way of knowing this? Did life used to be run at such a slow pace that a whole hour staring at nothing would not be unnatural?

I suspect very few people ever sat still that long. Certainly I could be wrong. It's just that an hour is longer than people think. I will sit for so long reading that Graham will come home when I think I've got an hour yet before I have to get up for dinner. To me, that's much preferable anyway.

Swift
2009-Sep-11, 05:17 PM
One more thing the internet killed (at least for me) is the thought "I am the only one who xyz". xyz = for example "invented a personal language".
This lead to the realization that you cannot be eccentric enough to be unique ;)
That is an extremely good point. There are certainly "xyz"s that I've thought about, thinking I'm the only one who must do/think/like such crazy things, only now (post-Internet) to discover there are entire websites and on-line communities devoted to.

Fazor
2009-Sep-11, 05:45 PM
That is an extremely good point. There are certainly "xyz"s that I've thought about, thinking I'm the only one who must do/think/like such crazy things, only now (post-Internet) to discover there are entire websites and on-line communities devoted to.

Yea, unfortunately most cost $30/month to join. Wait, that's not what you meant, is it? ;)

Glom
2009-Sep-11, 05:48 PM
That is an extremely good point. There are certainly "xyz"s that I've thought about, thinking I'm the only one who must do/think/like such crazy things, only now (post-Internet) to discover there are entire websites and on-line communities devoted to.

Devoted to what???

Swift
2009-Sep-11, 06:06 PM
Devoted to what???
Debunking bad astronomy, as one example. ;)

And yes, some of them are of an adult nature (since one of the reasons we might not know others are interested is that they are not topics normally discussed in public) and will not be exampled here.

Gigabyte
2009-Sep-11, 08:49 PM
That would belong on the other list.

50 things you can do with the Internet.

DonM435
2009-Sep-12, 05:29 PM
When I got my first VCR back in 1984, I was amazed by the LED digital clock that was always on. In the ensuing years, I had so many devices around the house (tv, cable box, stove, microwave) that displayed the time that I figured I'd never want to buy a clock (i.e. one that was just a clock) again.

Later models would often omit the clock, figuring that you have plenty of time displays around the house. As I replaced things, I reached a point wherein I needed a dedicated clock again.

Gillianren
2009-Sep-12, 06:24 PM
I keep a dedicated clock in my bathroom, actually--I like long baths, but sometimes, I actually have to be out at a certain time for whatever reason--and one in my living room. I don't in my kitchen, but that's because I think the appliance most likely to have a clock in it will always be the microwave.

nauthiz
2009-Sep-12, 10:00 PM
In the past few kitchens I've had, there has been a clock on the conventional oven but no microwave clock.

Cougar
2009-Sep-13, 02:01 AM
Remember when all the talk was about phones in watches? Now we have watches in phones.

That is funny. :lol: But these phones you can carry around just slightly more inconveniently than a pocket watch.

LaurelHS
2009-Sep-13, 03:02 AM
Yeah, I noticed the "dead time" one myself. Now, I never spent an hour staring out the window, because my brain gets twitchy, but at least once a week, I take a nice, long, hot bath and read a book. I don't read as many books as I used to in my pre-internet days, but I'm not entirely sure hours spent reading TV Tropes or the Onion AV Club should qualify as not being "dead time." Or watching movies. Or the nice, pleasant walk around the block I take when my physical state, mental state, and the weather coincide. (My block is large enough, due to vagaries of the local geography, that it's about a mile.) Of course, my situation is also quite different from the average.

For one thing, I don't own a cell phone!

About the "dead time" thing, I re-read favourite books all the time. There's something about familiarity that I like, I guess. And I love to shop for books, but not online unless it's a really hard-to-find book that I desperately want. There are five places within walking distance of my apartment to buy books (and those are just the ones I know about). The other day, I spent a long time at the park, sitting by the fountain, re-reading a poetry book, enjoying the sun, and watching people and dogs walk around.

I don't own a cell phone either. I don't really like to talk on the phone anyway.

Gillianren
2009-Sep-13, 05:40 AM
See, while there's a bookstore or two theoretically within walking distance of my apartment, not in practical terms, especially given my physical state. I do like browsing online, and I love that I can use the library's catalog from home 24 hours a day. But I also have more than a few books that show signs of all the time they spent living in my backpack when I was in high school. Junior high, even, some of them.

cosmocrazy
2009-Sep-13, 06:24 PM
That is funny. :lol: But these phones you can carry around just slightly more inconveniently than a pocket watch.

I looked at buying a watch phone recently, but after some thought i changed my mind. First they are not as discreet as something you can just put in your pocket and ignore when you choose to. Also it seems to me that either it would be very uncomfortable to talk and listen at the same time, or you would be sharing your conversation with those around you, unless you wear an ear piece of course but this would really be not much different than clipping your phone to your side. Also if like me you use your phone with both hands this would be limited since it would be on one wrist only. Still i guess you would not have to worry about misplacing it somewhere if you keep it on your wrist as you would any normal watch.

HenrikOlsen
2009-Sep-13, 07:39 PM
I'm still waiting for the phone that has the speaker implanted in my thumb and the microphone implanted in my pinkie so I can actually be phoning someone while signing it:D

Gigabyte
2009-Sep-13, 07:42 PM
I know a guy that can get that for you.

tdvance
2009-Sep-13, 09:37 PM
I'm still waiting for the shoe phone! That would go along with my tape recorder that is really a camera and camera that is really a tape recorder.

Gigabyte
2009-Sep-13, 10:02 PM
Get Smart Shoe Phone Sold for $39,000.00 On EBay (http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/391591/get_smart_shoe_phone_sold_for_3900000.html)

timb
2009-Sep-13, 10:22 PM
That is funny. :lol: But these phones you can carry around just slightly more inconveniently than a pocket watch.

At one point I would have said that reflected a failure of miniaturization, however I think it is now largely due to the fact modern mobile phones have so many features. It's likely 80% of mobile phones users don't use 80% of the features. Would there be a market for a wristwatch sized mobile phone that was just a phone and a watch?

Gigabyte
2009-Sep-13, 10:50 PM
All the watch phones you could ever use (http://www.sourcinggate.com/watch-phone-c-4_184.html?zenid=36fbf17bc4e6eec03101f013e0aedf92) .

grant hutchison
2009-Sep-13, 10:53 PM
27) Knowing telephone numbers off by heart
After typing the digits into your contacts book, you need never look at them again. Another thing killed by the cell phone, not by the internet.I use a mobile phone about once a year. I turn it on, I make a one-minute call, I turn it off again. The phone I use on these occasions was manufactured in the last millennium, and its lo-res B&W screen hasn't worked in five years. A Young Person recently asked me how I could make calls if I couldn't see the screen menus. She was astonished that I actually knew all the numbers I might want to call. And her eyes actually filled with tears when she realized I could neither send nor receive text messages.

Grant Hutchison

Gigabyte
2009-Sep-13, 10:54 PM
Real tears?

Cougar
2009-Sep-13, 11:02 PM
I use a mobile phone about once a year. I turn it on, I make a one-minute call, I turn it off again.

Afraid to go over on minutes?

grant hutchison
2009-Sep-13, 11:07 PM
Would there be a market for a wristwatch sized mobile phone that was just a phone and a watch?Me, I'd buy a phone-sized mobile phone that was just a phone. I'm already geared up with consumer electronics that do the other things I really want in life.

A friend of mine went into a mobile phone shop a few years ago, and told them he wanted to buy a phone.
"What do you want it to do?" asked the assistant.
"I would like it to initiate and receive telephone calls," he replied, slowly and clearly.

That's me, I'm afraid ... :lol:

Grant Hutchison

grant hutchison
2009-Sep-13, 11:21 PM
Afraid to go over on minutes?The phone calls are generally of the form, "I'm alive. I'll be home in [x] hours." But it's possible one might be of the form, "Help! I'm at [x] location."
So I'm a pay-as-you-go kind of guy.

Grant Hutchison

HenrikOlsen
2009-Sep-13, 11:24 PM
All the watch phones you could ever use (http://www.sourcinggate.com/watch-phone-c-4_184.html?zenid=36fbf17bc4e6eec03101f013e0aedf92) .
And most of them also have a built in camera:doh:

Gigabyte
2009-Sep-13, 11:29 PM
Who would a thunk it?

Gillianren
2009-Sep-13, 11:52 PM
Me, I'd buy a phone-sized mobile phone that was just a phone.

I think there's a bigger market for that than some companies realize.

HenrikOlsen
2009-Sep-14, 01:06 AM
I think they know exactly how big the market is, but also know there's no profit in it and therefore tries to push that market segment into buying more advanced phones than they really want.

grant hutchison
2009-Sep-14, 01:19 AM
I think they know exactly how big the market is, but also know there's no profit in it and therefore tries to push that market segment into buying more advanced phones than they really want.Yes, I think you're right. The basic mobile phone market saturated long ago, so profit now comes only from convincing people they need to buy options in addition to mere telephony.

Grant Hutchions

kleindoofy
2009-Sep-14, 01:46 AM
The cell phone industry still thinks it's in a boom market and doesn't seem to be able to adjust to the fact that almost everybody already has a cell phone and that annual growth rates of 25-40% in their niche are a thing of the past.

They call normal selling rates--just like those most other branches have--a 'crisis' instead of just facing reality.