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View Full Version : Detecting Krypton Gas in Replacement Windows?



Scamp
2009-Sep-21, 08:07 PM
We recently replaced the windows in our home. Looking to "go green" and save a few bucks on heating costs over time we opted for the more expensive Krypton gas filled windows. In theory Krypton gas gives you better insulation and sound suppression.

Being that Krypton is colorless (and somewhat expensive), it makes me wonder if it's really in there at all.

Granted the new windows do seem to keep out sound better, but that could be because they replaced decades old single pane windows. So I was wondering, is there a non-destructive way to verify the windows do in fact have Krypton gas between the panes?

BigDon
2009-Sep-21, 08:13 PM
Consult the BBB and ask them if they know if the business is honest. Cheap and a good start.

mike alexander
2009-Sep-21, 08:15 PM
I suppose that if you had a hand-held spectroscope you could look at sunlight through the window and see if any krypton absorption lines show up. Don't know if there's enough of a gas column to get a decent absorption, though.

Scamp
2009-Sep-21, 08:18 PM
I suppose that if you had a hand-held spectroscope you could look at sunlight through the window and see if any krypton absorption lines show up. Don't know if there's enough of a gas column to get a decent absorption, though.

My first thought was to use a simple prism to look for the absorption lines, but as you say with only about 1/2 Inch between the panes I'm guessing that would fail.

Swift
2009-Sep-21, 08:22 PM
krypton lines (http://astro.u-strasbg.fr/~koppen/discharge/krypton.html)

I also found this paper:
Detection of argon and krypton traces in noble gases by diode laser absorption spectrometry (http://www.springerlink.com/content/rgwuf7nrnpk5k9u6/)

And if you could pull a tiny sample, I think mass spectroscopy would show it. But from a practical standpoint, BD probably has the best answer.

Scamp
2009-Sep-21, 08:47 PM
krypton lines (http://astro.u-strasbg.fr/~koppen/discharge/krypton.html)


Ok, that's funny. The link you gave is for ionized Krypton excited in a electrical discharge so I did a Google for "Krypton absorption lines". Guess what the number one result for that phrase is? Yup. This thread. Doh!

mike alexander
2009-Sep-21, 09:15 PM
The lines will be the same, absorbtion or emission.

korjik
2009-Sep-21, 09:27 PM
The lines will be the same, absorbtion or emission.

ionized is different than neutral tho

BigDon
2009-Sep-21, 10:25 PM
ionized is different than neutral tho

yeah, I think I'd rather be neutral than ionized.

korjik
2009-Sep-21, 11:51 PM
yeah, I think I'd rather be neutral than ionized.

Well there's your problem. Without things like calcium ions and sodium ions, your body dosent work right.

:D

tdvance
2009-Sep-22, 02:46 AM
and Calcium and Sodium (neutral), are poisons!

mugaliens
2009-Sep-22, 09:11 AM
Potassium will kill you, too, but it sure is tasty in cashews!

Scamp - Trying to obtain a sample will simply break the hermetic seal and result in your loosing the krypton out of your window. If you can find a laser spectrometer, have at it. Otherwise, it's time to protect your investment (windows aren't cheap!) and trust the manufacturer.

Ara Pacis
2009-Sep-22, 01:45 PM
Can't you use Windows Genuine Advantage to check?

sarongsong
2009-Sep-22, 03:52 PM
You could ask Superman to look into it... :whistle: