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Buttercup
2009-Oct-06, 09:06 PM
Since some folks are discussing autumn (my favorite season, but it's still summer-like here), I thought I'd create this poll. What's your favorite thing about pumpkins? I mean besides the fact that they're pleasantly plump and beautifully orange. :D

Neverfly
2009-Oct-06, 09:12 PM
I chose "pumpkin pie."

But truth told, what I like about pumpkins is how versatile they are. Many uses.

Swift
2009-Oct-06, 09:56 PM
I voted pumpkin pie, though bread and muffins are good too, and the other uses are fine. A couple of times my wife has made this pumpkin mousse that is fantastic.

mike alexander
2009-Oct-06, 09:59 PM
I voted for pumpkin pie, since I enjoy making it.

What I really like is the jack 'o lanterns left out long after Hallow'een, watching them sort of sag and slump in.

Buttercup
2009-Oct-06, 10:07 PM
Near my Midwestern hometown is this HUGE pumpkin patch. They also have a seasonal store, selling everything from T-shirts to pies and breads, even pumpkin "butter" (like an applesauce). Last visited in 1994. The surrounding cornfields were golden, blackbirds were gathering to fly south. :) Everywhere were hundreds of gorgeous pumpkins. Sigh

GeorgeLeRoyTirebiter
2009-Oct-06, 10:41 PM
My favorite thing didn't make the poll: ˇpepitas! (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pepita).

aurora
2009-Oct-06, 10:50 PM
I make a pumpkin soup to die for.

Buttercup
2009-Oct-06, 11:00 PM
I'd like to have included pumpkin soup and toasted seeds, but Poll only allows 5 options. :(

KaiYeves
2009-Oct-06, 11:07 PM
The pie is good, and the jack-o-lanterns are fun, but I think my favorite thing about pumpkins is that they're orange, and orange is my second-favorite color.

Trebuchet
2009-Oct-06, 11:08 PM
I don't suppose anyone can guess what I voted for!

LaurelHS
2009-Oct-07, 12:54 AM
I can't decide. I love pumpkin pie and will be probably be eating some next week for Canadian Thanksgiving, but I like jack-o-lanterns too. My sister used to make them with cat faces, which was cute. :)

mugaliens
2009-Oct-07, 01:58 AM
I was going to say "their color," but when I saw that pumpkin pie was on the menu...

grav
2009-Oct-07, 02:00 AM
π (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GuKsSNqFnZM)

kleindoofy
2009-Oct-07, 02:24 AM
Oh dear, there's one very blatant omission in the list of choices:

Drying the seeds, taking them with you to school (7th grade), and flicking them at the girls in the row in front of you in class a couple of days after Halloween. ;)

sarongsong
2009-Oct-07, 05:43 AM
The best thing about pumpkins is:callin'em punkins! http://www.bautforum.com/images/icons/icon10.gif

jokergirl
2009-Oct-07, 01:33 PM
You don't have an option for pumpkin cream soup! :eek:

;)

Buttercup
2009-Oct-07, 01:52 PM
I don't suppose anyone can guess what I voted for!

Pumpkin bread! :D :p

jfribrg
2009-Oct-07, 02:05 PM
I voted the same as Trebuchet

Click Ticker
2009-Oct-07, 02:08 PM
Pumpkin Cheesecake.

Nick Theodorakis
2009-Oct-07, 02:10 PM
I voted the same as Trebuchet

If the words "Trebuchet" and "pumpkins" appear together I can only assume that is a vote for hurling them.

Nick

grav
2009-Oct-07, 05:03 PM
How'd everybody enjoy the pumpkin pie song? :)

rommel543
2009-Oct-07, 06:19 PM
Definitely the pumpkin is the BEST!. Warm out of the oven, with whipped cream. MMmmmm. Yummy.

Swift
2009-Oct-07, 06:23 PM
I have to tell a pumpkin - Jack-o-lattern story.

Last fall, we put a nice group of gourds and a big pumpkin on the stoop for decoration. One morning I noticed a single hole "carved" in the pumpkin, like someone made a Jack-o-lattern with just a mouth. When I investigated I found that the top had not been opened up, yet when I looked in the hole, all the seeds had been removed. I also noticed the hole looked more chewed than cut. My best guess is the mice chewed their way in and ate all the seeds. So we have mice that carve our pumpkins!

R.A.F.
2009-Oct-07, 06:29 PM
I voted for carving Jack 'O' lanterns. My reasoning being that Pumpkin pie (my 2nd choice) can be had at other times of the year, such as Thanksgiving and x-mas, while carving pumpkins is specifically done for Halloween.

Aside...Halloween happens to be my favorite holiday as my b-day is Nov. 1st. As a kid, I always had a big bag of candy left over to enjoy on my birthday. :)

grav
2009-Oct-07, 06:44 PM
I voted for carving Jack 'O' lanterns. My reasoning being that Pumpkin pie (my 2nd choice) can be had at other times of the year, such as Thanksgiving and x-mas, while carving pumpkins is specifically done for Halloween.

Aside...Halloween happens to be my favorite holiday as my b-day is Nov. 1st. As a kid, I always had a big bag of candy left over to enjoy on my birthday. :)Yes, thanksgiving, christmas, middle of the week, it's all good. :) Here's a pumpkin pie tease (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8TSS6JvZGM&feature=related) I think you guys will like. In case anyone missed the first one, just click on the pi symbol in my first post. Don't worry, your identity won't be deleted. ;)

Buttercup
2009-Oct-07, 06:46 PM
Interesting story, Swift!

R.A.F., that was a nice birthday bonus for you.

Speaking of all the Halloween candy, we always dumped the contents of the pail onto the floor and sorted out Good/Yummy Candy from ...not so yummy candy. :D

One year my nephew's candy pail (very light-weight plastic) weighed a whopping 5 pounds. Yep: 5 pounds of candy!

I need to put out my decorative gourds/pumpkins this weekend.

:edit: I'll check out Grav's pumpkin pie song. :)

mahesh
2009-Oct-07, 06:46 PM
Swift, that reminds me of the story of Mr RickJ's mouse/mice and his telescope.
Here:
http://www.bautforum.com/astrophotography/91262-note-paramount-users.html

...It was jammed full of sunflower seeds, at least 2 pounds of them, it was packed solid. Some mouse had been going up the RA shaft out the end of its upper bearing into the declination housing and using it for a storage locker!...

We do have some great mice at BAUT!

trinitree88
2009-Oct-07, 06:59 PM
I have to tell a pumpkin - Jack-o-lattern story.

Last fall, we put a nice group of gourds and a big pumpkin on the stoop for decoration. One morning I noticed a single hole "carved" in the pumpkin, like someone made a Jack-o-lattern with just a mouth. When I investigated I found that the top had not been opened up, yet when I looked in the hole, all the seeds had been removed. I also noticed the hole looked more chewed than cut. My best guess is the mice chewed their way in and ate all the seeds. So we have mice that carve our pumpkins!

Swift. Yep, and when the frost nips the punkins at the garden center, they start to rot, giving off a strong but not unpleasant odor. We take them out back and hurl them against the big pine trees till the ground is littered with debris. The next morning....deer...seven of them, chowing down on fermenting pumpkin, the most we've ever seen in the yard. I'm with Trebuchet...you gotta love those guys.

NEOWatcher
2009-Oct-07, 07:02 PM
I make a pumpkin soup to die for.

You don't have an option for pumpkin cream soup! :eek:

;)
YUM..
Let's see... I think I have had pumpkin soup every halloween for the last 40 years.
Although I don't follow the traditional recipe, I have come up with my own streamlined way.

Saute somewhere between 3 and a dozen large diced onions. (the more the better in my opinion, but tastes vary) - oh, and garlic too.
Grate the meat of a medium pumpkin (probably around 8 to 12 inches) and add to the onions.
Add a couple pints of sour cream.
Heat until desired texture is reached (slowly or it will curdle).

Garnish with Garlic powder and/or vinegar, along with the usual salt and pepper.

Swift
2009-Oct-07, 07:18 PM
Swift. Yep, and when the frost nips the punkins at the garden center, they start to rot, giving off a strong but not unpleasant odor. We take them out back and hurl them against the big pine trees till the ground is littered with debris. The next morning....deer...seven of them, chowing down on fermenting pumpkin, the most we've ever seen in the yard. I'm with Trebuchet...you gotta love those guys.
We have had that happen multiple times. We usually leave the pumpkins and gourds out till they start to rot, which can be quite a long time after Halloween. We often get to the point where we go "tomorrow, they go in the compost", to find the next morning that the deer have eaten them.

tlbs101
2009-Oct-07, 08:06 PM
Pumpkins are a very very inexpensive vegetable this time of year. Whether you make a pie (my favorite), soup (I will definitely try NEOWatcher's recipe), bread, bake it straight as squash/gourd with a little salt & pepper, or feed it to the animals, it is one of the best values in a food-item.

NEOWatcher
2009-Oct-07, 08:15 PM
(I will definitely try NEOWatcher's recipe)
Thanks. Two things.
First, I mentioned about heating slowly, but should point out that the sour cream is added to the cold/cool pumpkin.

Second; The hardest part of it all, is getting the rind off the pumpkin before grating. If you find an easy way, let me know. I tend to just hack away at narrow slices of pumpkin.

Edit: Make that 3 things. The greener the pumpkin, the better.

jokergirl
2009-Oct-07, 08:54 PM
Second; The hardest part of it all, is getting the rind off the pumpkin before grating. If you find an easy way, let me know. I tend to just hack away at narrow slices of pumpkin.

Use a vegetable peeler, the type you use for carrots or potatoes, on slices. You will need several turns to get all of the peel off, but it's the only thing that I found works.

;)

jokergirl
2009-Oct-07, 08:58 PM
Also: Making a rovin' punkin. (http://www.evilmadscientist.com/article.php/rovin)

;)

Trebuchet
2009-Oct-07, 11:00 PM
The worst thing about pumpkins: A few years ago our neighbor decided to decorate for fall and put out a number of very large pumpkins. Typically for this neighbor, they were still there in April or May. Not in very good shape, either. They finally removed them with a shovel.

I once saw the same neighbor taking a Christmas tree out of the house in may. A real one.

KaiYeves
2009-Oct-07, 11:47 PM
Once, when I was very little, I had a small pumpkin that I never carved that lasted until New Year's Eve in my room. Then I asked my dad if we could carve it for the New Year, and he said he didn't know any New Years designs.

danscope
2009-Oct-08, 02:50 AM
Since some folks are discussing autumn (my favorite season, but it's still summer-like here), I thought I'd create this poll. What's your favorite thing about pumpkins? I mean besides the fact that they're pleasantly plump and beautifully orange. :D

HI, In my family, we make an effort to find good sized Sugar Pumpkins !
These get stuffed and baked with meat, potatoes and spices and an egg
custard poured on top to hold it together. Baked at 400 degrees for an hour,
they turn a mahogony brown colour, as the sugar caramelizes. Taste even better the second day. Nukes up well. A compleat meal.
Best regards,
Dan

BigDon
2009-Oct-08, 08:17 AM
I voted number one.

Because, oddly enough, Buttercup listed what I like about them in the exact order I like them in.

mugaliens
2009-Oct-08, 08:18 AM
How'd everybody enjoy the pumpkin pie song? :)

I just watched it, grav - funny!

I sent the link to my son.

- Mugs

slang
2009-Oct-08, 08:32 AM
I don't suppose anyone can guess what I voted for!

I'm not ashamed to admit that you personally are the reason why I opened the thread to check the poll options for completeness :)

geonuc
2009-Oct-08, 08:52 AM
I voted pumpkin carving - I like all the creative scary things people do with them. Pumpkin pie is a close second.

Pumpkin ice cream is good.

Buttercup
2009-Oct-08, 11:58 AM
I'm enjoying reading the replies. :) Pumpkin ice cream, geonuc? I'd like to try it. Danscope, that recipe sounds delicious.


Because, oddly enough, Buttercup listed what I like about them in the exact order I like them in.

Great minds think alike. ;)

I planted pumpkin seeds in the family garden around age 15. Next-door neighbors (George & Bertha, retired farmers) were a bit skeptical as to how the seeds would fare. My parents were not good gardeners, but I planted the seeds anyway -- and out came a bumpercrop of those beautiful orange orbs. :D George & Bertha were especially surprised and delighted, and Bertha made quite a few homemade pies from the pumpkins I gave them.

NEOWatcher
2009-Oct-08, 05:21 PM
Use a vegetable peeler, the type you use for carrots or potatoes, on slices. You will need several turns to get all of the peel off, but it's the only thing that I found works.

;)
Several is an understatement. I'd rather drop the pumpkin into a tree bark stripper.

danscope
2009-Oct-08, 06:23 PM
[QUOTE=Buttercup;1592401]I'm enjoying reading the replies. :) Pumpkin ice cream, geonuc? I'd like to try it. Danscope, that recipe sounds delicious.

Hi, This is an old recipie going way back. We love it the way it is.
First: you need a SUGAR PUMPKIN !!!! Not a jackolantern. The sugar pumpkin needs to be about the size of a bowling ball ... if you are going to get a good amount of stuffing into it. At least 9 inches or so will work,
and you can bake off the left over stuffing in a glass dish or even another pumpkin. There might be little dots on it. That is a good sign that it is a SUGAR PUMPKIN. This will yield a sweet and delicious dish!!!
SET YOUR OVEN TO 400 degrees. Do it now !
I take two pound of fresh ground hamburger. You can add just a little pork sausage if you like. Fry this up untill it is slightly brown, no red showing. Season the meat with some salt and pepper. Not so much salt...1/2 tsp. and 1 tsp. pepper, and add 1/2 tsp. ground cloves...sprinkled from above. This is delicious, but don't just throw it into one spot. Sprinkle it around. If you decide you like it, push the cloves up to 1 tsp. Everybody is differnt.
This spice was more popular and exceedingly precious back in early America.
Cook up as much potatoes as you have meat, cut like homefries, you know, cut in half, then cut lengthwise and then five cuts through. Done. Cover with water and a pich of salt. Cook 7 to ten minutes, not mushy but rather untill you can break them with a fork. Toss with the sauteed onion which follows.
Sautee at least one onion, chopped with butter and olive oil,salt and pepper
and a dash of celery salt. Clear them out but don't really brown them.
Now, hog out the pumpkin , taper cut the lid and put an indexing notch so that the lid goes on proper. Take a good strong heavy duty spoon and scrape the string out once you have removed the seeds etc.
Now, take 5/8ths cup of sugar with 1 tsp. cinnamon and a half tsp of
ground cloves. If they are 7 years old, spring for some fresh spices. Better.
1/2 tsp salt. Mix up this mixture. Pour it into the pumpkin and roll the pumpkin around so as to coat the inside of the pumpkin well including the lid.
Now start filling the pumkin with the mixture of cooked meat, onion and
potatoes while they are HOT .... Take two eggs and a 1/3 cup of half n half or light cream , a dash of salt n pepper and beat this for a custard. Pour this
into the pumpkin on top of the stuffing. This will set up durring baking and hold stuff together when you serve it. Put the lid on.
Place the pumpkin into a large pie plate or large round casserole dish and then fill to half way with hot water. (bain marie) This makes steam in the oven.... SO.... BE CAREFULL WHEN YOU OPEN THE OVEN !! Rocket science.:)
Keep your face BACK. Steam is not fun but a good tool.
This will bake for an hour to 1 hr 15 min. When you can pierce it easily with a knife and the outside is a dark mahogany colour, it is done. Remove carefully and serve. Cut a slice from the top hemisphere and cut at the equator, Use a deep wedge pie server and remove slice. Some green beans or corn makes a nice side. Hot cider works.
If you have a real sugar pumpkin, this recipie is well worth while and actually slaps together easilly. Great the next day. Keeps refrigerated for three . From my kitchen to yours. Best regards, Dan

jokergirl
2009-Oct-08, 07:08 PM
Several is an understatement. I'd rather drop the pumpkin into a tree bark stripper.

Well, other than that I have no recommendation other than roasting it with the peel on and scraping out after cooking...

;)

Buttercup
2009-Oct-08, 07:53 PM
Danscope, thanks for posting your recipe in full. I was going to check Google for ideas, but I'll follow yours. :) Sugar pumpkins are available here; I know what you're referring to. This sounds like a wonderful cold-weather dish. I just might try my hand at it for the Thanksgiving holiday!

Thanks for the warning about the steam too.

As for scraping out pumpkins, I've found that a looped serrated "comb" (the type used in dog grooming) works best. Just whirl it around hard a couple of times, then dump the pumpkin upside-down. That gets most of the strings and seeds.

Trebuchet
2009-Oct-08, 08:09 PM
Several is an understatement. I'd rather drop the pumpkin into a tree bark stripper.

That would be a log debarker. I used to design those for a living!
http://www.debarking.com/

NEOWatcher
2009-Oct-08, 11:21 PM
That would be a log debarker. I used to design those for a living!
http://www.debarking.com/
Ah thanks; I was thinking of a machine like that but could only find this one man mechanized logging crew...AFM Harvester (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6WwPHeM5ltI).

danscope
2009-Oct-09, 03:36 AM
[QUOTE=Buttercup;1592741]Danscope, thanks for posting your recipe in full. I was going to check Google for ideas, but I'll follow yours. :) Sugar pumpkins are available here; I know what you're referring to. This sounds like a wonderful cold-weather dish. I just might try my hand at it for the Thanksgiving holiday!
*******************************

Hi, I hope you like it as well as I do. I have used buffalo, Venison etc.
But it is the spices that bring it to life. Even the lid is delicious.
Makes you wonder why they don't grow more sugar pumpkins... especially the bowling ball sized !! Make one before thanksgiving. Get a feel for it.
If you have the luxury of a second oven, Thanksgiving day will be a
triumph!. Otherwise, you will have to nuke individual slices .
Let me know how this worked out for you.
Best regards,
Dan

Celestial Mechanic
2009-Oct-09, 04:46 AM
I just baked some pumpkin and raisin cookies tonight. First time I've ever made caramel frosting. Getting into the mood for pumpkin pies again real soon.

jokergirl
2009-Oct-09, 06:32 AM
I found a nice vegetarian stuffed pumpkin recipe that works on the same principle as the one above. It's a bit subtler in taste though - originally from a cookbook by Jamie Oliver, but I took out some ingredients that were just fancy and too distracting in my opinion. It works well with butternut squash.

Cut squash in half, scrape out the strings and toss away. Scrape out some of the meat and put it in a pan with some olive oil, sauteed shallots and garlic. Add 1-2 measuring cups of rice - this really depends on the size of your squash, you'll have to eyeball it. Stir so the rice is covered.
Take a handful of dried porcini mushrooms and pour hot water on them to rehydrate. Add to the rice etc. in the pan. Add salt, pepper and herbs - sage, thyme or rosemary is nice. Let steam for a bit until the liquid is reduced and put into the squash halves. Stick together with some rosemary in between, wrap the packet in aluminium foil (rubbing the outside of the squash with olive oil helps) and stuff in the oven until the rice is fully cooked. It takes about uh... I think 60 minutes for me usually. Guess it depends on size etc. again. (You can precook the risotto a bit more if you're impatient, but really, it gets better if it cooks inside the squash.)

Jamie added pine nuts/roasted pumpkin seeds and sundried tomatoes as well, but I really think the taste gets too busy then. A chopped canned tomato added to the liquid works well though. Just experiment and find your own taste.

;)

mugaliens
2009-Oct-09, 08:17 AM
Uh-oh... The hurlers and smashers are catching up...

Buttercup
2009-Oct-09, 12:11 PM
Wish I did have the luxury of 2 ovens, danscope. ;) I look forward to trying it, and Jokergirl posted a yummy vegetarian version; thank you.


Jamie added pine nuts/roasted pumpkin seeds and sundried tomatoes as well, but I really think the taste gets too busy then.

:confused: Yeah, I'd agree with you there. Sundried tomatoes? No.

Pumpkin raisin cookies with caramel frosting; I'm drooling! :D

sarongsong
2009-Oct-09, 04:07 PM
"Cookies!!! Umm-num-num-num-num!!!"


Cream 1/2 C. butter and 1 1/4 C. brown sugar til light and fluffy,
add 2 well-beaten eggs, 1 1/2 C. pumpkin puree.

Sift together:
2 1/2 C. sifted flour,
3 tsp. baking powder,
1 tsp. cinnamon,
1/2 tsp. nutmeg,
1/2 tsp. salt,
1/4 tsp. ginger.

Add dry to wet ingredients, stirring until well blended.

Add 1 C. raisins, 1 C. chopped pecans

Spoon batter onto buttered baking sheet using a teaspoon.

Bake 15 minutes at 400° F, or until lightly browned.

- The Gourmet Cookbook, Volume II

BigDon
2009-Oct-09, 06:46 PM
Buttercup, I'll try to get some pictures of the pumpkin fields south of where I live. We have quite a few major farms in the area of Half Moon Bay. With pumpkin fields being a bit more photogenic than artichoke or garlic patchs.

Buttercup
2009-Oct-09, 07:39 PM
Thanks for the recipe, Sarongsong. BigDon, that sounds terrific. :) I look forward to those pics, if you're able.

There aren't any pumpkin patches around here, just private gardens.

Trebuchet
2009-Oct-10, 12:08 AM
Uh-oh... The hurlers and smashers are catching up...

I considered registering a few sock puppets just to vote for the highest (like a thousand feet above ground level) use of pumpkins but decided to follow the rules.

sarongsong
2009-Oct-10, 01:35 AM
...(like a thousand feet above ground level) use of pumpkins..."Hide the children!" :eek:
...a. Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (RVSM) reduces the standard separation...from 2,000 feet to 1,000 feet for those aircraft approved for operation within these altitude strata.
b. RVSM is applied in that airspace...over the domestic United States, Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico where the FAA provides air traffic services...across international borders with Canada and Mexico, and the Pacific and Atlantic Oceanic airspace controlled by the FAA...
FAA (http://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/atpubs/FAC/Ch6/s0609.html)

Buzz-Lite-Punch
2009-Oct-10, 01:59 AM
Well this will be my third year at carving Pumpkin for Halloween night. I’m not all that great at it, it does require time and it usual takes me a few hours as I don’t want pop out again to buy another Pumpkin even thou they are cheap from ASDA store.

Last years theme was a cat since I had just brought a kitten.

http://i279.photobucket.com/albums/kk123/IndianaJones34/Halloweenpumpkincat.jpg

I’m uncertain at this point what theme I want to do for this Halloween?

dwnielsen
2009-Oct-10, 07:26 AM
My pumpkin lasted about 3 days. I chucked it yesterday, as it had become full of little flies and begun to cave in.

http://www.lovelight11.com/dan/MEDIA/log/carvedPumpkin.jpg

The seeds were good, though. Why not put them on the poll?

SolusLupus
2009-Oct-10, 08:31 AM
Nothing.

Well, rather, I don't like anything in particular about pumpkins that I cannot find in any other kind of squash. ;)

Buzz-Lite-Punch
2009-Oct-11, 08:17 AM
My pumpkin lasted about 3 days. I chucked it yesterday, as it had become full of little flies and begun to cave in.

http://www.lovelight11.com/dan/MEDIA/log/carvedPumpkin.jpg

The seeds were good, though. Why not put them on the poll?

That’s a wickedly cool pumpkin. Yeah about the same they just decay. If you filmed it with time-lapse you could playback your pumpkin at fast film/video rate and watch it…yeah :hand: yuck!

crosscountry
2009-Oct-11, 06:46 PM
I chose "pumpkin pie."

But truth told, what I like about pumpkins is how versatile they are. Many uses.

pie!

crosscountry
2009-Oct-11, 06:48 PM
I voted for pumpkin pie, since I enjoy making it.

What I really like is the jack 'o lanterns left out long after Hallow'een, watching them sort of sag and slump in.

do you do it from scratch? I like picking my own pumpkin and going from there.

dwnielsen
2009-Oct-11, 07:50 PM
That’s a wickedly cool pumpkin. Yeah about the same they just decay. If you filmed it with time-lapse you could playback your pumpkin at fast film/video rate and watch it…yeah :hand: yuck!

Hey, thanks! Yeah, Halloween is so much better with digital cameras.

Buttercup
2009-Oct-13, 01:36 AM
A local bakery is making chocolate chip pumpkin cookies. I bought a box (8 cookies per) and they are delicious. I was very skeptical about pairing chocolate chips with a pumpkin cookie, and there's quite a few chips in each. The cookies are just right moist, chewy, spiced. I also bought pumpkin creme bread (it's still too warm to bake here).

Our large decorative (unmarked) pumpkin is standing guard near our garden gate, and today while treating my sister-in-law to lunch at a buffet restaurant I enjoyed a piece of perfectly spiced pumpkin pie. :D

sarongsong
2009-Oct-13, 01:54 AM
...(it's still too warm to bake here)...All together now:
"How warm is it?!" :lol:

Buttercup
2009-Oct-13, 03:52 AM
All together now:
"How warm is it?!" :lol:

We're still averaging 82 F daytime. :)

Nick Theodorakis
2009-Oct-13, 12:56 PM
A local bakery is making chocolate chip pumpkin cookies. I bought a box (8 cookies per) and they are delicious. I was very skeptical about pairing chocolate chips with a pumpkin cookie, and there's quite a few chips in each. The cookies are just right moist, chewy, spiced. I also bought pumpkin creme bread (it's still too warm to bake here).
...

There are few sweet baked goods that are not improved by the addition of chocolate. :)

Nick

Buttercup
2009-Oct-13, 01:17 PM
There are few sweet baked goods that are not improved by the addition of chocolate. :)

Nick

That is a good point, lol! It still seems odd to me though, but yes it does work. I'd passed those cookies up a couple of past seasons, but this year decided what the heck -- try them. Glad I did.

pumpkinpie
2009-Oct-13, 01:43 PM
Ummm...pumpkinpie, of course!

Actually, of the post options I'd prefer eating bread over the pie. But I tend to love anything pumpkin in general. Pumpkin Pie lattes are great, and I make a mean pumpkin soup.

I found a recipe I want to try: pumpkin cookie ice cream sandwiches. Make sure to roll the sides in chocolate chips!

Buttercup
2009-Oct-13, 02:53 PM
Ummm...pumpkinpie, of course!

Actually, of the post options I'd prefer eating bread over the pie. But I tend to love anything pumpkin in general. Pumpkin Pie lattes are great, and I make a mean pumpkin soup.

I found a recipe I want to try: pumpkin cookie ice cream sandwiches. Make sure to roll the sides in chocolate chips!

I was wondering if you'd chime in. :) Lattes, huh? That'd go good with a fresh pumpkin donut. Bakeries in this area aren't making those this year, but I especially like 'em with maple frosting.

jokergirl
2009-Oct-13, 03:10 PM
We're still averaging 82 F daytime. :)

:eek: It snowed in Stockholm for the first time this season in the morning. I envy you.

;)

flynjack1
2009-Oct-13, 04:36 PM
I would vote Pie! However for some strange reason the survey says I already voted. Dont recall having done that. In writing however I will contribute....there is one contender for pie and that is pumpkin beer. A friend of mine used to make pumpkin beer every year. Very tasty but I could only drink one before becoming overcome by the flavor of pumpkin pie.

Buttercup
2009-Oct-13, 04:52 PM
Pumpkin beer? Never head of it. I dislike beer but would be willing to take a sip of that. Come to think of it, pumpkin flavor might go rather well with root beer; it (homemade) is already seasoned with vanilla and spices.

HenrikOlsen
2009-Oct-13, 05:27 PM
Over the years there's probably nothing organic whatsoever that people haven't tried to make alcohol from.

flynjack1
2009-Oct-14, 12:12 AM
If it ferments it can be done...Actually pumpkin beer taste great, but its like eating cheesecake in that a little bit goes a long way.

crosscountry
2009-Oct-16, 04:41 AM
I bought a 6er of pumpkin beer last week. very tasty. I wouldn't buy it out of season though.

tnjrp
2009-Oct-16, 04:51 AM
Mmm, pie...

NEOWatcher
2009-Oct-16, 05:57 PM
Ok; recently made the soup I mentioned earlier (http://www.bautforum.com/1591672-post29.html). (talking about it made me want
some) Let me update it a bit.
I used 5 large onions. Not enough, but as you get more, browning them in a single batch is difficult. You may need smaller saute batches.

10 inch pumpkin. I couldn't find one that was green enough to my liking. It may have contributed to a more bland soup, I actually added more salt than I'm used to. (I rarely use salt)

2 pints sour cream, about right, but more wouldn't hurt. This time I tried something new, and popped in a block of cream cheese too. Not bad...

Water... I thought I get enough from the pumpkin cooking down. Nope, start off with about a quart. It will help the cooking and stirring to prevent burning.

Pepper... definitely pepper. But then again, I'm a pepper freek to begin with.

As far as peeling the pumpkin. I first cut it into narrow strips (about 2 inches at the widest - that fits into my grater) Then sliced off the rind as usual. But since the pumpkin was bigger, I didn't have as much miserly tendencies to prevent wasting the meat. In other words, hacked away, to the devil with the waste.

danscope
2009-Oct-17, 02:16 AM
Last night Danscope made stuffed pumpkin. Even better the next day.
You can't believe how tasty a stuffed pumpkin is. :)

Dan

sarongsong
2009-Oct-17, 02:46 AM
...The seeds were good, though. Why not put them on the poll?Yumm!
October 15, 2009
...Traditionally, you separate the seeds from the fibrous strands and clean them with water before roasting...arrange them in an even layer on a baking sheet and bake for 10 minutes at 350 degrees. If not perfectly golden, leave them in the oven and check every minute until done...
Quinn prefers a simpler method for cleaning seeds. Rather than wash the fibers off the seeds, she toasts everything.
"I throw the whole mess in the oven, and once they are dried out, it separates very easily," she says. If you go that route, roast them spread out in an even layer on a baking sheet at 375 degrees until the fibers dry out and fall away from the seeds.
Once clean, transfer the seeds to a bowl and toss with olive oil, peanut or saffron oil. Then add your spices...
North County Times (http://www.nctimes.com/lifestyles/food-and-cooking/article_23ddd5f3-b588-5ae3-8db7-f5cf094ba6ab.html)

BigDon
2009-Oct-18, 02:04 AM
Last night Danscope made stuffed pumpkin. Even better the next day.
You can't believe how tasty a stuffed pumpkin is. :)

Dan

What do you stuff a pumpkin with Mr. Scope? And how long do you cook it?

Nick Theodorakis
2009-Oct-18, 03:24 AM
What do you stuff a pumpkin with Mr. Scope? And how long do you cook it?

Look up-thread (post #44).

Nick

danscope
2009-Oct-18, 03:31 AM
Hi Don, This recipie is for a sugar pumpkin. These don't often come very large, so you have to press your local farm stand or green grocer for a bowling ball sized pumpkin. That means a 10 inch pumpkin. Smaller....
well you start losing the mount you can stuff them . Of course you can
save and cook some more stuffing in a casserole dish to add to your plate.
Set the oven at 400 degree. Do it now.
Basically, we need to brown up 1 1/2 lbs or so of hamburger. Variations
employ venison , buffalo and or adding some ground pork..maybe 1/3 pound or so. Brown this up in a large skillet or stir fry wok (this works) untill the pink is gone. drain this. Saute a couple Onions with some butter and olive oil,
salt and pepper.
Cook up as much potatoes as you have meat. Remember: we are stuffing
maybe 3 quarts or more 0f this pumpkin. The idea is to have the stuffing all cooked and warm when you stuff the pumpkin. Don't cook potatoes to mush.
A fork should break them easily. Yukon gold, red, Maine white.

Now, the secret old time New England spice for this dish is Ground Cloves.
If you don't like it, well, cinnamon will do.... but it isn't quite the same.
I sprinkle 1/2 tsp or so into the meat once it is mostly brown along with a little salt and then fresh cracked pepper to taste. It is difficult.....but
Not Impossible to abuse pepper. Combine Onions, potatos and meat, and season the whole business with ground cloves (perhaps a teaspoon) and a little celery salt.
Now, for the pumpkin. The handle will jus burn, so remove it .
Take a nice thin shapr knife and cut the lid on a slant going in and down,
same as you would a jackolanter, cutting a notch so as to index the lid.
Once you have the lid cut, it will come free with some of the string and seeds. You can wash, dry and then save the seeds to plant you own pumpkins next season. Google how to grow sugar pumpkins.
With a sharpish spoon, hog out the pumpkin, taking the string and seeds
out. If there some, not to worry. Nobody is grading you on pumpkin cleaning.
You might wash any dirt off the outside first. :)
Now, mix up about 5/8ths of a cup of sugar with 2 teaspoons of cinnamon, 1 tsp. of ground cloves, some salt and pepper, mix well and pour into the pumpkin, put on the lid and roll it around, turn it upside down so as to coat the entire inside. Pour out any that's loose, and save. Add hot stuffing to half way, add half of what's left of the sugar spice, add stuffing to full and spread the rest of the sugar/spice mix. Now......
beat two eggs with 5 tablespoons of light cream or half n half, and some salt and pepper. Gently pour this egg mixture onto the meat stuffing. This will form a custard which will set up within the stuffing and hold it all together as you serve it. Now... place the lid on top.
Place the pumpkin into a large round pie dish or glass pyrex round casserole dish, something which has a good handle. Place the pumpkin into the hot oven. Get the kettle and pour some boiling water between the pumpkin and the dish which is in the oven. (Don't try to move a pumpkin with the water in the dish. Not good. 1 1/2 " water is enough.
REMEMBER: There WILL BE STEAM IN THIS HOT OVEN. !!!! YES.
KEEP you head well away when you open the door . ALWAYS.
Carefully slide the dish to the center of oven. Close door.
Generally, it take 1 hour twenty minutes. When you can pierce the pumpkin with a large barbecue fork or knife and it feels cooked, it's done.
The larger the pumpkin, well maybe a little more time.
To serve, take a sharp knife and cut the skin low and cut a slice .
Make miine 3 1/2 " . :) Get a serving spatula about that size, and maybe a large spoon to steady the slice as you serve it. It should stay together if you did the egg thing. The pumpkin when cooked, has a distinctly dark brown colour, owing to the sugar in the skin caramelizing. It smwells terrific and the taste is well worth the effort. Serve some corn on the side. It keeps a few days refrigerated. It nukes well the second day. Makes a fine snack.
Even the lid is delicious.
For the extra stuffing, add just a little water ( 2 tbs.) to the covered dish it will warm in.15 minutes in the over will do.
Spices are a matter of taste for many individualls. Play it by ear. You will be the judge of what you like best.
The sugar pumpkin is one of the crown jewels of the vegetable world.
I hope you enjoy this. Let me know how you liked it. Once you've made it, it slaps together easy.
Best regards,
Dan

crosscountry
2009-Oct-18, 02:05 PM
sounds good, I'm inspired.

danscope
2009-Oct-18, 04:23 PM
Thanks, It is really simple enough, and well worth the time. :)
Best regards,
Dan

Big Brother Dunk
2009-Oct-18, 04:58 PM
Pumpkin pie, but not by much.\

A close second was Smashing Pumkins

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQSxwzOngMU

Buttercup
2009-Oct-19, 01:20 AM
Stuffed sugar pumpkin and pumpkin soup: I'm going to give both a try soon. :)