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Normandy6644
2004-Feb-03, 07:36 PM
Yeah, this isn't really astronomy, but it's really cool and I don't know where else to put it with BABBling down. Go to google.com and check out their image. It's awesome!!

Intelligent design (hehe, puns are fun.) (http://www.google.com)

Andromeda321
2004-Feb-03, 07:42 PM
Yea, I saw it this morning and got rather excited.
Any reason they picked today for the day to show it?

cyswxman
2004-Feb-03, 08:23 PM
I'm sorry, I'm probably going to regret this, but what's the design about? :-k

SpaceTrekkie
2004-Feb-03, 08:31 PM
I'm sorry, I'm probably going to regret this, but what's the design about? :-k

I was jsut looking at that and went to asked one of my friends...she had no idea either. Dont regret asking..how else are you gonna learn?

It is really cool looking and if you click on it you get a bunch of images of thinks like that. What is it tho (as cyswxman) asked?

Tensor
2004-Feb-03, 08:57 PM
I'm sorry, I'm probably going to regret this, but what's the design about? :-k

I was jsut looking at that and went to asked one of my friends...she had no idea either. Dont regret asking..how else are you gonna learn?

It is really cool looking and if you click on it you get a bunch of images of thinks like that. What is it tho (as cyswxman) asked?

They are called Fractals and if you go here (http://www.math.umass.edu/~mconnors/fractal/fractal.html) there is an explanation of what, why and how. If you type in fractal in the google search, you can see quite a few sites that have fractal images.

cyswxman
2004-Feb-03, 09:55 PM
Thank you! :D

Squink
2004-Feb-03, 10:11 PM
Today isGaston Julia (http://www.fractovia.org/people/julia.html)'s birthday. He's best known for his discovery of the fractal Julia set (http://mathworld.wolfram.com/JuliaSet.html).
If you click on the Google logo today, it'll take you to a set of pictures of fractals.

Evil_Bomber
2004-Feb-03, 11:47 PM
Call me incredibly geeky, but the logo seems to be more based off of Mandelbrot sets than Julia sets.

I had a calc teacher in high school who was quite interested in chaos theory and got some of the more academic students to study up on it. Of course, since me and a few other students in that class were also independent studies in computer programming, we would often make various programs that created all sorts of fractal designs. It was lots of fun doing graphical programming in DOS 5 on 486SXs, surprised we didn't melt any of the CPUs :wink: