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View Full Version : Giant Impact Near India — Not Mexico — May Have Killed Dinosaurs



Fraser
2009-Oct-19, 04:00 PM
A huge, mysterious basin off the coast of India could be the largest, multi-ringed impact crater ever found on Earth. And if a new study is right, this impact may supercede the one that created the Chicxulub crater off Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula as what may have been responsible for killing the dinosaurs 65 million [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2009/10/19/giant-impact-near-india-not-mexico-may-have-killed-dinosaurs/)

Tuckerfan
2009-Oct-19, 05:42 PM
I keep hearing Sympathy for the Devil by the Rolling Stones in my head as I read that article for some reason.

I shouted out,
Who killed the dinosaurs?
When after all
It was you and me
Let me please introduce myself
I'm an asteroid from outer space

publiusr
2009-Oct-19, 06:59 PM
So many jokes...

So it might be likely that it was a one/two punch that helped kill off the great saurians? That might help explain why the Cretaceous ended with the "reset" button being pushed--as opposed to the "pause" button at the end of the Jurassic and Triassic.

I wonder if both came in at once--and if both were Baptistinas

I also see that the gradualists/uniformitarianist school still hates catastrophists--intractable as ever. They will probably want to call this cryptoexplosive/crypto-volcanic like they did with Barringer.

hhEb09'1
2009-Oct-19, 07:22 PM
I also see that the gradualists/uniformitarianist school still hates catastrophists--intractable as ever. They will probably want to call this cryptoexplosive/crypto-volcanic like they did with Barringer.I dunno, just from that article at UT, it sounds a lot like Yellowstone, no? It mentions that there are some expeditions planned to search for meteor crater characteristics. Maybe they should've waited until those results were in?

antoniseb
2009-Oct-19, 07:29 PM
I like that in the face of ambiguous available evidence, there are people willing to fund the operation to collect some less ambiguous evidence.

To me one of the big things supporting Chix was the variation in the thickness of the Iridium layer being thickest near the Yucatan. How does that work for this place?

Tuckerfan
2009-Oct-19, 07:40 PM
It wasn't asteroids that did in the dinosaurs. 'Twas algae that killed the beasts. (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091019134716.htm)
Supervolcanoes and cosmic impacts get all the terrible glory for causing mass extinctions, but a new theory suggests lowly algae may be the killer behind the world's great species annihilations.

clint
2009-Oct-20, 09:56 PM
It wasn't asteroids that did in the dinosaurs. 'Twas algae that killed the beasts. (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091019134716.htm)

Hmm, that makes me wonder how mammals made it through the last big extinction.
Is there any reason to believe mammals are somehow more resilient to those algae toxins than dinosaurs?

Tuckerfan
2009-Oct-21, 04:40 AM
Hmm, that makes me wonder how mammals made it through the last big extinction.
Is there any reason to believe mammals are somehow more resilient to those algae toxins than dinosaurs?

It might simply be that the mammals (and certain other species, like amphibians, which managed to survive impact events) could take advantage of areas that weren't filled with algae toxins.

hhEb09'1
2009-Oct-24, 09:33 PM
It wasn't asteroids that did in the dinosaurs. 'Twas algae that killed the beasts. (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091019134716.htm)We pretty much know/knew asteroids did not kill the beasts directly--just look at the size of the asteroid. Relative to a 12 inch desk globe (30 cm for the metrically challenged), an asteroid might be the size of a pinhead. It's the side-effects, like fallout and climate change, that produce the long-term fatalities.

TheHalcyonYear
2009-Oct-24, 09:54 PM
We pretty much know/knew asteroids did not kill the beasts directly--just look at the size of the asteroid. Relative to a 12 inch desk globe (30 cm for the metrically challenged), an asteroid might be the size of a pinhead. It's the side-effects, like fallout and climate change, that produce the long-term fatalities.
However, there is a lot of evidence that points to alternative explanations for the extinction. An asteroid is a possibility, but by no means the leading hypothesis for the dinosaur extinction.

ShadowSot
2009-Oct-24, 10:11 PM
What came first, I wonder. The algae bloom or the impact?
That would help explain the loss of the larger marine reptiles as well.

Also, the later impact could lead to an explanation for the finding of dinosaur fossils that post dated the earlier impact.