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aurora
2004-Feb-09, 02:36 AM
No, not that there is something wrong, they called the maneuver touch and go. Close up of the outcrop in the crater.

Check out the Sol 15 images from the panoramic camera and the microscopic imager. I'm hoping the geologists give us an interpretation by tomorrow!
http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all/opportunity.html

home page:
http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.html

Squink
2004-Feb-09, 04:32 AM
Wow! That layering is awesome, and it doesn't all line up, despite the wind scoured appearance of the rocks.
The nodules, and particularly the apparent "cheerio" disk at the bottom of micrograph 1M129516228EFF0312P2933M2M1 are sure to fuel wild speculation.

Wingnut Ninja
2004-Feb-09, 05:01 AM
I was all set to come ask "isn't the whole point of the rover to touch and go?" :)

harlequin
2004-Feb-09, 05:18 AM
No, not that there is something wrong, they called the maneuver touch and go. Close up of the outcrop in the crater.

Check out the Sol 15 images from the panoramic camera and the microscopic imager. I'm hoping the geologists give us an interpretation by tomorrow!
http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all/opportunity.html

home page:
http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.html

Sol 14 has some really good images as well. For example this (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all/1/p/014/1P129424178EFF0300P2377L3M1.HTML).

I guess the press release people have taken the weekend off.

harlequin
2004-Feb-09, 05:34 AM
Spirit has many new photos not yet shown in the press releases as well.Here is one (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all/2/p/035/2P129466606EFF0327P2577L4M1.HTML) with a slightly different look at the landscape then we are used too. And another from two sols ago (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all/2/p/033/2P129304109EFF0327P2384R1M1.HTML).

Unbunker
2004-Feb-09, 06:13 AM
Thanks guys, and here I was waiting everyone for press release images when I could of been looking at the raw ones all this time. :o

Swift
2004-Feb-09, 02:04 PM
I find the very fine pitting in the rock interesting.
http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all/1/m/015/1M129515786EFF0312P2933M2M1.HTML
Anyone know what the scale is?

Amadeus
2004-Feb-09, 04:26 PM
I find the very fine pitting in the rock interesting.
http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all/1/m/015/1M129515786EFF0312P2933M2M1.HTML
Anyone know what the scale is?

Kinda looks like a salt deposit....

ToSeek
2004-Feb-11, 08:55 PM
What's coming up for Opportunity (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/opportunity/20040211a.html) - includes a map showing the next couple of stops for the rover.

EckJerome
2004-Feb-11, 11:40 PM
I find the very fine pitting in the rock interesting.
http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all/1/m/015/1M129515786EFF0312P2933M2M1.HTML
Anyone know what the scale is?

Press captionss for the "microscopic" images indicate they cover an area about three centimeters across (a bit over an inch). I quote the word because the view is more akin to what a geologist would see with a field lens rather than an actual microscope. The spherules are about 3 millimeters (1/10th inch) in diameter.

FYI, the imager can't change its magnification or its focus...so all micoscopic images are going to cover about the same area. Focusing is accomplished by actually moving the instrument. You'll notice in the raw image archives that they take multiple images (while incrementally moving the instrument)...one of which will be in best focus.