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Fraser
2009-Oct-29, 12:30 AM
Far away in the constellation of Aries, in a 14th magnitude barred spiral galaxy designated as NGC 918… a star exploded with enough candlepower to briefly outshine its home. Discovered independently by Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) and Koichi Itagaki (Japan) on October 11, 2009, this Type II supernova might be hiding in the [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2009/10/28/supernova-2009js-another-one-bites-the-dust/)

trinitree88
2009-Oct-29, 04:06 PM
Far away in the constellation of Aries, in a 14th magnitude barred spiral galaxy designated as NGC 918… a star exploded with enough candlepower to briefly outshine its home. Discovered independently by Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) and Koichi Itagaki (Japan) on October 11, 2009, this Type II supernova might be hiding in the [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2009/10/28/supernova-2009js-another-one-bites-the-dust/)

Fraser. Actually, the origin of the effect is quite clear. The same data that showed that the axisymmetric supernova remnants in the Andromeda galaxy were generally aligned with the ambient galactic magnetic field suggest that the explosions that were type 2 in nature ejected their pulsars aligned or anti-aligned, too. This implies that the ejecta clears out the minor axis by a succession of explosions over millenia, leaving the view described by Arp. Pulsars should then be found principally circulating up and down thru the galactic plane as most are gravitationally bound, but on an occasion ejected when the birth kick exceeds the gravitational binding energy. (Most are bound, though).

Weakly Interacting MP
2009-Oct-29, 04:45 PM
Fraser. Actually, the origin of the effect is quite clear. The same data that showed that the axisymmetric supernova remnants in the Andromeda galaxy were generally aligned with the ambient galactic magnetic field suggest that the explosions that were type 2 in nature ejected their pulsars aligned or anti-aligned, too. This implies that the ejecta clears out the minor axis by a succession of explosions over millenia, leaving the view described by Arp. Pulsars should then be found principally circulating up and down thru the galactic plane as most are gravitationally bound, but on an occasion ejected when the birth kick exceeds the gravitational binding energy. (Most are bound, though)...bolding mine

Really? Citation please.