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megrfl
2009-Nov-02, 03:52 AM
Actually, I don't think there was a meal, she just had an urge to eat 78 pieces of silverware.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/6455477/Woman-swallows-78-items-of-cutlery.html

Is this a hoax? It seems inconceivable or impossible. :confused:

LaurelHS
2009-Nov-02, 04:00 AM
There is an eating disorder called pica (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pica_%28disorder%29) that makes people want to eat strange things, but I've never heard of someone eating 78 pieces of silverware.

It reminds me of a story in an old issue of Seventeen magazine called "The Spoon Suckers," about girl whose younger brothers eats metal (aluminum cans and small items like paper clips, screws, and staples) and sleeps with a spoon in his mouth like a pacifier. I don't remember the year or the month this story appeared, unfortunately, because I no longer have my old magazine collection.

megrfl
2009-Nov-02, 04:20 AM
Thanks for providing a link. It is very bizarre, in that it is a mental disorder, not a physical deficiency, as in you crave it because you need it.

mugaliens
2009-Nov-02, 04:42 AM
They confirmed that the woman had only ever eaten forks and spoons – but never knives. They were unable to explain why.

Really? No clue, eh? :rolleyes:

megrfl
2009-Nov-02, 02:26 PM
Really? No clue, eh? :rolleyes:

:) This is just a guess, but I would think that butter knives would go down easier than forks.

I can't fathom how she swallowed (gag) (choke) 78 pieces of unyielding silverware and how a person could have that much dense weight in their body. Silverware is heavy.

grant hutchison
2009-Nov-02, 02:39 PM
Yes, a lot of dinner knives are pretty blunt, and go down easier than a spoon if swallowed handle first.
Cutlery swallowing is practically a recreational activity for some inmates of prisons: it gets them out for a day or two on a visit to hospital. The trick (they tell me) is to get your head and neck into the sword-swallowing position, so that the axis of the oropharynx aligns with the oesophagus, and then to just drop the cutlery in, handle first, so that it goes past the gag reflex quickly.
Another favourite is to thickly wrap a razor blade in adhesive tape, and swallow that. The blade shows up on X-ray, the wrapping doesn't.

Grant Hutchison

Arnold Layne
2009-Nov-02, 02:44 PM
Yes, a lot of dinner knives are pretty blunt, and go down easier than a spoon if swallowed handle first.

I hope you do not know this through personal experience!

megrfl
2009-Nov-02, 02:59 PM
Yes, a lot of dinner knives are pretty blunt, and go down easier than a spoon if swallowed handle first.
Cutlery swallowing is practically a recreational activity for some inmates of prisons: it gets them out for a day or two on a visit to hospital. The trick (they tell me) is to get your head and neck into the sword-swallowing position, so that the axis of the oropharynx aligns with the oesophagus, and then to just drop the cutlery in, handle first, so that it goes past the gag reflex quickly.

Well then, haha -- it's just not something I would want to witness.


The blade shows up on X-ray, the wrapping doesn't.

That's the other issue, at least in my ignorance, isn't it dangerous to have an x-ray when there is metal involved? Wouldn't the metal heat up, maybe I'm confusing x-rays with microwaves?

Nick Theodorakis
2009-Nov-02, 03:08 PM
...
That's the other issue, at least in my ignorance, isn't it dangerous to have an x-ray when there is metal involved? Wouldn't the metal heat up, maybe I'm confusing x-rays with microwaves?

No, no, and perhaps. (or maybe confusing it with MRIs).

Orthopedists often need to x-ray patients after installing metal hardware.

Nick

grant hutchison
2009-Nov-02, 04:12 PM
I hope you do not know this through personal experience!Second-hand. It's always interesting to chat to people who do unusual things, such as swallow cutlery. Some of course don't want to speak, but others will give you a pretty detailed dissertation on the do's and don't's.

Grant Hutchison

grant hutchison
2009-Nov-02, 04:17 PM
That's the other issue, at least in my ignorance, isn't it dangerous to have an x-ray when there is metal involved? Wouldn't the metal heat up, maybe I'm confusing x-rays with microwaves?X-rays aren't a problem: the cutlery just blocks the x-rays and shows up on the film, which is the object of the exercise.
The intense magnetic field used in MRI will move ferromagnetic objects quite vigorously (potentially lethally), so there's a checklist that must be gone through before anyone even approaches an MRI scanner. Any doubt, and there's no scan.

Grant Hutchison

megrfl
2009-Nov-02, 05:50 PM
Nick and Grant, Thanks. :)

Gillianren
2009-Nov-02, 05:57 PM
It reminds me of a story in an old issue of Seventeen magazine called "The Spoon Suckers," about girl whose younger brothers eats metal (aluminum cans and small items like paper clips, screws, and staples) and sleeps with a spoon in his mouth like a pacifier. I don't remember the year or the month this story appeared, unfortunately, because I no longer have my old magazine collection.

Similarly, there's a children's book called Dear Lola, by Judie Angell, which has a kid who eats non-food items under stress, though not generally metal. I have to admit, I found the kid as described in the book kind of implausible. 78 pieces of silverware? Yeah, I'm not buying it.

megrfl
2009-Nov-02, 06:31 PM
Gillianren, I agree that it doesn't seem possible, but I just did a google search, "Woman who swallowed 78 pieces of silverware, a hoax?" and the link below provided additional information and pictures.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldnews/article-1223563/The-woman-knife--swallowing-entire-canteen-cutlery.html

Apparently, it occurred 30 years ago, giving it possibly less credence. I don't know.

grant hutchison
2009-Nov-02, 06:59 PM
I'm not entirely sure why people find this so implausible. People can and do swallow cutlery. It's common enough for me to have met several in the last thirty years. The stomach is a highly distensible organ, and can accommodate quite massive objects (such as trichobezoar stones (http://www.gastrolab.net/y0615.jpg)) while still functioning more or less normally.
So there's no a priori reason for this to be impossible. The position and orientation of the cutlery on the X-ray of the lady's abdomen (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldnews/article-1223563/The-woman-knife--swallowing-entire-canteen-cutlery.html) is also very plausible: if it's a fake, it was faked with more medical knowledge than most spoof X-rays I've seen.

Grant Hutchison

ETA: A trichobezoar is a concretion formed from hair, ingested over long periods by some people who suffer from pica. The one in the X-ray I linked to above is unusually large, but it gives you an idea of what can be accommodated by the stomach. (Do a Google image search on the word "trichobezoar" for more of the same.)

Nicolas
2009-Nov-02, 07:44 PM
Second-hand. It's always interesting to chat to people who do unusual things, such as swallow cutlery. Some of course don't want to speak, but others will give you a pretty detailed dissertation on the do's and don't's.

Grant Hutchison

There are do's to swallowing cutlery?

grant hutchison
2009-Nov-02, 07:53 PM
There are do's to swallowing cutlery?:lol:
But if one accepts the basic premise (swallowing cutlery is desirable), then there's quite a lot of useful advice to be had. The handle-first thing, for instance. And one fella assured me that knives are easier than dessert spoons, which are easier than forks. He personally avoided soup spoons.

Grant Hutchison

LaurelHS
2009-Nov-02, 09:43 PM
Looking over this thread again, I am reminded of the episode of M*A*S*H called 38 Across when Klinger tried to eat a Jeep (one of his many schemes to get a Section 8 discharge from the Army).

SolusLupus
2009-Nov-02, 09:47 PM
I just want to further the, "It doesn't seem so implausible to me" argument.

tdvance
2009-Nov-02, 10:46 PM
Well then, haha -- it's just not something I would want to witness.



That's the other issue, at least in my ignorance, isn't it dangerous to have an x-ray when there is metal involved? Wouldn't the metal heat up, maybe I'm confusing x-rays with microwaves?

Apparently not--as a child, I swallowed a (small) screwdriver and was x-rayed with no harmful effects.

grant hutchison
2009-Nov-02, 11:05 PM
Apparently not--as a child, I swallowed a (small) screwdriver and was x-rayed with no harmful effects.Yes, the usual management for relatively small ingested objects (coins, bits of toys, batteries) is to X-ray to confirm size and location, and then ... ummm ... await what comes to pass.
If there's no show after ~48 hours, another X-ray is taken to check for progress.

Grant Hutchison

publiusr
2009-Nov-02, 11:13 PM
One lady lost her wedding ring in her hallooween candy bucket. She probably won't get it back tho' It has either been hocked or worse:



"Mommy, I think I'm sick"

clink

megrfl
2009-Nov-03, 12:47 AM
I'm not entirely sure why people find this so implausible.

Incredulity, and at least for me, conjecture.


People can and do swallow cutlery. It's common enough for me to have met several in the last thirty years. The stomach is a highly distensible organ, and can accommodate quite massive objects (such as trichobezoar stones (http://www.gastrolab.net/y0615.jpg)) while still functioning more or less normally.
So there's no a priori reason for this to be impossible. The position and orientation of the cutlery on the X-ray of the lady's abdomen (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldnews/article-1223563/The-woman-knife--swallowing-entire-canteen-cutlery.html) is also very plausible: if it's a fake, it was faked with more medical knowledge than most spoof X-rays I've seen.

After reading the above, I can conclude that it is plausible. :)

While eating dinner tonight, I imagined swallowing my fork, it is not something I could do. :sick:

Nick Theodorakis
2009-Nov-03, 01:32 AM
Yes, the usual management for relatively small ingested objects (coins, bits of toys, batteries) is to X-ray to confirm size and location, and then ... ummm ... await what comes to pass.
If there's no show after ~48 hours, another X-ray is taken to check for progress.

Grant Hutchison

"How is the boy who swallowed the silver dollar?"

"There's still no change."

Nick

HenrikOlsen
2009-Nov-03, 06:59 AM
ETA: A trichobezoar is a concretion formed from hair, ingested over long periods by some people who suffer from pica.
It's funny the random bits of data you collect over a life, I actually knew that. Isn't that manifestation of pica (eating hair) also known as Rapunzel syndrome?

grant hutchison
2009-Nov-03, 09:18 AM
It's funny the random bits of data you collect over a life, I actually knew that. Isn't that manifestation of pica (eating hair) also known as Rapunzel syndrome?Yes, although there seems to be some uncertainty (http://content.karger.com/produktedb/produkte.asp?typ=fulltext&file=000102098) about the exact features required to qualify for the label.

Grant Hutchison

Nicolas
2009-Nov-03, 05:13 PM
"How is the boy who swallowed the silver dollar?"

"There's still no change."

Nick

What you need, is the instant rimshot website (http://instantrimshot.com/). (just press the red button)